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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Public speaking consistently ranks as one of life's most stressful events, up there with divorce, bereavement and home foreclosure. But there's a look of paralytic terror on the face of the protagonist of "The King's Speech" that goes beyond any working definition of stage fright. As the man who will one day become King George VI prepares to deliver a few ceremonial remarks, his doomed countenance suggests not so much a judgmental audience as a firing squad. Colin Firth, who portrays "Bertie," the second-born, stammering son of Great Britain's King George V, captures the adrenaline-racing horror of a person obliged to speak when speech itself is an uncertain thing.
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SPORTS
February 22, 2012 | T.J. Simers
It figured to be one of those welcome to L.A. interviews, the scary, animated and intimidating tattoo that is Kenyon Martin saying, "Why don't you put on your basketball shoes, come on the court and I will run right through you. " I think that was after I said hello. You hear about this thug now playing for the Clippers, the run-in he had with a radio guy in Denver, his suspension at halftime of a playoff game for getting into it with Denver Coach George Karl , and more Karl bashing this week.
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NATIONAL
August 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The state has agreed to pay $925,000 to unwitting subjects of an infamous 1930s stuttering experiment -- orphans who were badgered and belittled as children by University of Iowa researchers trying to induce speech impediments. Johnson County District Court Judge Denver Dillard issued an order approving the settlement, which still must be ratified by the State Appeal Board. The six plaintiffs said the experiment left lifelong psychological and emotional scars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Sam Chwat was a master of accents who taught Robert De Niro to talk like an Appalachian ex-convict, Olympia Dukakis to talk like a Holocaust survivor and Peter Boyle to talk like a bigot from the Deep South. A modern-day Henry Higgins, he also trained some actors to lose accents, helping Julia Roberts drop her native Georgia drawl and Tony Danza his distinctive Brooklynese. Chwat even turned his training on himself, muting his own "Noo Yawk" accent to prevent clients from miming the wrong cues.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | PAUL ARNOLD, THE WASHINGTON POST
Only a few months ago, Derrick Lane would fill with anxiety every time his telephone rang. He is a stutterer. The 14-year-old was embarrassed when he would stumble over his "Hello." Instead, he recalled, he often simply let the phone ring. The phone "always rings unexpectedly, and so I would get nervous right before I answered it," Derrick explained. "I would stutter when I did answer it, because I didn't know who was calling. I felt uncomfortable and didn't like it." For the 2.
NEWS
April 3, 2002 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mouth disconnects from the brain. You start to speak and nothing comes out. At the drive-thru window, you order the food you can pronounce, not the food you want. You fret over making a presentation to colleagues because the simple act of speaking is a struggle. Gerald Maguire knows the frustrations well. He is a stutterer. That is why the UC Irvine psychiatry professor is trying to find a cure for the disorder, which affects 3 million Americans.
NEWS
January 14, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Public speaking can be stressful, especially when it comes with the job. Witness King George VI, whose stuttering set off a royal crisis when he had to speak calmly to his jittery subjects during World War II. Some of us can relate -- and it has nothing to do with stuttering. Julie Deardorff in Julie’s Health Club blog reports on how to overcome public speaking anxiety. Here's what she says: "To combat the embarrassing blushing, shaking or sweating that may occur, invoke the 'quieting response,' a five-minute technique that occurs automatically with practice, said [Jonathan]
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1994
I strongly disagree with "Stuttering John" Melendez's claim that stutterers are somehow helped by his allowing his stuttering to be mocked and mimicked on the Howard Stern radio show (" 'Stuttering John' Ready for Rock World," May 13). IRA ZIMMERMAN Advocacy Committee Chairperson National Stuttering Project San Juan Capistrano
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1989
Jeff Kaye's Sept. 14 article, "Networks to Simulcast Animated Anti-Drug Show," showed insensitivity to stutterers. Kaye characterized the theme of the show as "J-J-J-Just Say No, Folks," even though no reference to Porky Pig was made at the press conference that announced the special. Is this an example of accurate reporting? Stutterers don't deserve to be made fun of by movies or television--or the Los Angeles Times. IRA ZIMMERMAN National Stuttering Project San Juan Capistrano
HEALTH
November 29, 2010
If you or someone in your family stutters, a number of national resources are available with information and professional help. To find a group or expert in your area, contact one of the following organizations: The National Stuttering Assn.: An organization with local chapters, some offering support groups. http://www.nsastutter.org , (800) WeStutter (937-8888) or (212) 944-4050. Stuttering Foundation of America: A national nonprofit organization devoted to providing up-to-date information about research, as well as help for parents and people who stutter.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Credit the "The King's Speech" for 12 Oscar nominations, $236 million in worldwide box office ? and a lot more business for speech therapists. Across the nation, clinics specializing in speech disorders and stutterers themselves say the film about British King George VI's battle to overcome a lifelong stammer has inspired many others, often shy and reluctant to seek assistance, to reach out for professional help. At the Stuttering Foundation of America, a nonprofit organization that provides information on stuttering and referrals to therapists nationwide, donations have shot up 20% since the movie opened, officials said.
OPINION
February 17, 2011
Obama and the speaker Re "The tongue-tied speaker," Editorial, Feb. 15 House Speaker John A. Boehner's adamant choice of silence as a response to accusations that President Obama is not an American makes him complicit in nothing short of perpetuating slander against the presidency. His rationalization that confronting constituents with the facts means telling people what to "think" is vacuous. At least Sen. John McCain had the guts and decency to speak the truth when the opportunity presented itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2011 | By David Freeman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If any best-picture contender was going to face questions about taking liberties with the facts this Oscar season, it seemed likely it would be "The Social Network. " But now that screenwriter Aaron Sorkin and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg have tactfully retreated a bit from their initially contentious stands, the accuracy debate has shifted to "The King's Speech. " "The King's Speech" is being sold as a feel-good tale of how a friendship between a royal and a commoner affected the course of history.
OPINION
February 11, 2011 | By Michael Palin
Colin Firth's performance as the stuttering King George VI in "The King's Speech" was difficult for me to watch. Don't get me wrong ? the acting is superb, and the true story the film portrays is certainly British filmmaking at its best. It was discomforting for me because it was a reminder of many childhood days spent sitting across the kitchen table from my father, waiting patiently as he, like his monarch, wrestled with an often paralyzing stutter. For the world's 65 million or so stutterers, it's little consolation to know that kings can suffer as much as commoners, or that some notable orators, including Winston Churchill, and movie stars such as Bruce Willis and Emily Blunt have had the same problem.
NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
“The King’s Speech” is a great film. But to Jane Fraser, president of the Stuttering Foundation , it's something more -- a long-yearned-for opportunity to get the word out to schools, therapists, the general public, anyone and everyone, about what it’s like for people to live with a stutter and how they can get help.   The movie’s kind of like a “Rain Man” for the stuttering world, Fraser said in a phone chat earlier this week. “We have a world-class, superb actor showing us how devastating it is to stutter,” she says.
NEWS
January 14, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Public speaking can be stressful, especially when it comes with the job. Witness King George VI, whose stuttering set off a royal crisis when he had to speak calmly to his jittery subjects during World War II. Some of us can relate -- and it has nothing to do with stuttering. Julie Deardorff in Julie’s Health Club blog reports on how to overcome public speaking anxiety. Here's what she says: "To combat the embarrassing blushing, shaking or sweating that may occur, invoke the 'quieting response,' a five-minute technique that occurs automatically with practice, said [Jonathan]
SCIENCE
August 5, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stuttering, which affects about 1% of people after childhood, is caused by an abnormal structure of the left side of the brain, German researchers reported in Saturday's edition of the British journal The Lancet. The study used magnetic resonance imaging to look at 15 stutterers and 15 people with normal speech and found the impediment results from a disconnection of speech-related areas in the cortex, a team from the University of Hamburg said.
SPORTS
January 9, 2011 | Jerry Crowe
For Dave Taylor, the story of a King working to overcome a debilitating speech impediment is more than a movie plot. It's his life. The former Kings captain, like the English monarch portrayed by Colin Firth in the critically acclaimed "The King's Speech," is a stutterer. And like King George VI of Britain, who confronted his speech disorder before taking over the throne in 1937, Taylor has subjugated his stammer to the point where few are probably even aware of it. "I've really made some good strides and I'm proud of that fact," Taylor says.
NEWS
December 9, 2010
David Seidler may have struggled with a profound stutter as a child, but he's recovered with a vengeance. Discussing his script for "The King's Speech," a pet project he pursued over decades and through a cancer bout (he's now in remission), he talks in long, uninterrupted paragraphs, with nary a hiccup to betray his former difficulties. Born in England and raised in the U.S. ? he maintains dual citizenship ? Seidler gravitated to the story of George VI (played by Colin Firth), known to his family as Bertie, whose paralyzing stutter was minimized with the help of Australian speech therapist Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush)
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