Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStuxnet
IN THE NEWS

Stuxnet

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
December 4, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
At an Iranian military base 30 miles west of Tehran, engineers were working on weapons that the armed forces chief of staff had boasted could give Israel a "strong punch in the mouth. " But then a huge explosion ripped through the Revolutionary Guard Corps base on Nov. 12, leveling most of the buildings. Government officials said 17 people were killed, including a founder of Iran's ballistic missile program, Gen. Hassan Tehrani Moghaddam. Iranian officials called the blast an accident.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 23, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
The Web can feel like an endless onslaught of information. There's never enough time to take it all in. Great stories slip by unread in the constant stream of updates, alerts and notifications. After a long week of info-overload, take a moment to unwind and relax with some of the week's best reads, long-form journalism and investigative reports from newspapers, magazines, websites and blogs -- including a few stories of our own. A three-part Reuters investigation looks into Setad , a powerful organization controlled by Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
October 1, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
In a gray office building across from the scenic Snake River, analysts from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security sift through the latest threat information on double-paneled, flat-screen computer monitors. They are not searching for rogue missile launches or terrorist plots, as other analysts do in other secure government rooms elsewhere in the U.S. Their job at the Idaho National Laboratory is to find and stop what experts warn is a growing risk to America: a cyber-attack that could disable water systems, chemical plants or parts of the electrical grid.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - As part of his effort to plug leaks, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is considering a proposal to force intelligence agency employees to answer a direct question in their polygraph examinations about whether they have disclosed information to reporters, according to officials familiar with the matter. Government officials who seek top-secret clearances are subject to an initial polygraph test and periodic renewals, in many cases every five years. Currently, they are asked whether they have ever disclosed classified information to someone not authorized to receive it.  But they are not specifically asked about contacts with the news media.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
What do you need to disrupt nuclear facilities of your enemy? A thumb drive. Well, that and a virulent cyber weapon such as Stuxnet that works so effectively that it takes out nothing but its target in a way that is more subtle than explosive. Stuxnet, a seek-and-disrupt cyber missile enshrouded in mystery and first publicly identified in 2010, has been attributed to U.S. efforts to interfere with and slow Iran's nuclear endeavors, according to the New York Times .  "You're seeing an evolution of warfare that's really intriguing," said Phil Lieberman, a security consultant and chief executive of Lieberman Software in Los Angeles.
WORLD
May 31, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Computer virus experts at Kaspersky Lab, acting with the blessing of the United Nations, were searching for a villain dubbed the Wiper when they came across a much more menacing suspect requiring a new moniker: Flame. The malicious program left experts all but certain that a government sponsor intent on cyber warfare and intelligence gathering was behind some suspicious activity, in part because of the likely cost of such a sophisticated endeavor. "We entered a dark room in search of something and came out with something else in our hands, something different, something huge and sinister," Vitaly Kamlyuk, a senior antivirus expert at Kaspersky Lab, said in an interview Wednesday.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - As part of his effort to plug leaks, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is considering a proposal to force intelligence agency employees to answer a direct question in their polygraph examinations about whether they have disclosed information to reporters, according to officials familiar with the matter. Government officials who seek top-secret clearances are subject to an initial polygraph test and periodic renewals, in many cases every five years. Currently, they are asked whether they have ever disclosed classified information to someone not authorized to receive it.  But they are not specifically asked about contacts with the news media.
WORLD
February 27, 2011 | By Tom Hamburger, Los Angeles Times
Fuel that would power Iran's first nuclear energy facility is being removed from the reactor this weekend because of unspecified safety concerns, Iranian officials have disclosed, a setback for the country's controversial nuclear program. A short statement late Friday from Iran's representative to the United Nations nuclear monitoring agency said fuel rods were being withdrawn from the Bushehr power plant, which has been under construction since the mid-1970s and is a symbol of pride for the Iranian government.
WORLD
February 25, 2011 | By Julia Damianova, Los Angeles Times
Iran increased its stockpile of low-enriched uranium in recent months despite intense international pressure and claims that a computer virus had slowed its program, a report Friday by the U.N.'s nuclear watchdog agency indicates. At the beginning of February, according to the report prepared for the board of governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Iran had nearly 8,000 pounds of uranium enriched to 3.5%, a quantity sufficient for about three nuclear weapons if further enriched to 90%. The U.S. and its allies suspect Iran of seeking to develop atomic weapons; Iran contends that its program is for peaceful purposes only.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Two stories published by the New York Times, which exposed the extent of U.S. involvement in cyber attacks against Iran and the White House's secret 'Kill List,' have sparked scrutiny over the last week amid allegations that administration officials had leaked classified information for political gain. The debate continued Sunday as Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) reiterated calls for a special prosecutor to take charge of leak investigations and as a reporter who wrote one of the stories said he doubted that any politically motivated leaks were involved.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Two stories published by the New York Times, which exposed the extent of U.S. involvement in cyber attacks against Iran and the White House's secret 'Kill List,' have sparked scrutiny over the last week amid allegations that administration officials had leaked classified information for political gain. The debate continued Sunday as Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) reiterated calls for a special prosecutor to take charge of leak investigations and as a reporter who wrote one of the stories said he doubted that any politically motivated leaks were involved.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
What do you need to disrupt nuclear facilities of your enemy? A thumb drive. Well, that and a virulent cyber weapon such as Stuxnet that works so effectively that it takes out nothing but its target in a way that is more subtle than explosive. Stuxnet, a seek-and-disrupt cyber missile enshrouded in mystery and first publicly identified in 2010, has been attributed to U.S. efforts to interfere with and slow Iran's nuclear endeavors, according to the New York Times .  "You're seeing an evolution of warfare that's really intriguing," said Phil Lieberman, a security consultant and chief executive of Lieberman Software in Los Angeles.
WORLD
May 31, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Computer virus experts at Kaspersky Lab, acting with the blessing of the United Nations, were searching for a villain dubbed the Wiper when they came across a much more menacing suspect requiring a new moniker: Flame. The malicious program left experts all but certain that a government sponsor intent on cyber warfare and intelligence gathering was behind some suspicious activity, in part because of the likely cost of such a sophisticated endeavor. "We entered a dark room in search of something and came out with something else in our hands, something different, something huge and sinister," Vitaly Kamlyuk, a senior antivirus expert at Kaspersky Lab, said in an interview Wednesday.
WORLD
December 4, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
At an Iranian military base 30 miles west of Tehran, engineers were working on weapons that the armed forces chief of staff had boasted could give Israel a "strong punch in the mouth. " But then a huge explosion ripped through the Revolutionary Guard Corps base on Nov. 12, leveling most of the buildings. Government officials said 17 people were killed, including a founder of Iran's ballistic missile program, Gen. Hassan Tehrani Moghaddam. Iranian officials called the blast an accident.
WORLD
November 30, 2011 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Among the protesters who sparked a diplomatic storm this week by ransacking two British diplomatic compounds in Tehran were some clutching portraits of a surprising icon, an Iranian nuclear scientist killed in a bombing one year ago. Although it's still far from clear who exactly killed Majid Shahriari, the rioting on the first anniversary of his death highlighted anger over the Western campaign to stop Iran's nuclear program, jitters over covert...
NATIONAL
October 1, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
In a gray office building across from the scenic Snake River, analysts from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security sift through the latest threat information on double-paneled, flat-screen computer monitors. They are not searching for rogue missile launches or terrorist plots, as other analysts do in other secure government rooms elsewhere in the U.S. Their job at the Idaho National Laboratory is to find and stop what experts warn is a growing risk to America: a cyber-attack that could disable water systems, chemical plants or parts of the electrical grid.
NATIONAL
November 23, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
The Web can feel like an endless onslaught of information. There's never enough time to take it all in. Great stories slip by unread in the constant stream of updates, alerts and notifications. After a long week of info-overload, take a moment to unwind and relax with some of the week's best reads, long-form journalism and investigative reports from newspapers, magazines, websites and blogs -- including a few stories of our own. A three-part Reuters investigation looks into Setad , a powerful organization controlled by Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
WORLD
November 30, 2011 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Among the protesters who sparked a diplomatic storm this week by ransacking two British diplomatic compounds in Tehran were some clutching portraits of a surprising icon, an Iranian nuclear scientist killed in a bombing one year ago. Although it's still far from clear who exactly killed Majid Shahriari, the rioting on the first anniversary of his death highlighted anger over the Western campaign to stop Iran's nuclear program, jitters over covert...
WORLD
February 27, 2011 | By Tom Hamburger, Los Angeles Times
Fuel that would power Iran's first nuclear energy facility is being removed from the reactor this weekend because of unspecified safety concerns, Iranian officials have disclosed, a setback for the country's controversial nuclear program. A short statement late Friday from Iran's representative to the United Nations nuclear monitoring agency said fuel rods were being withdrawn from the Bushehr power plant, which has been under construction since the mid-1970s and is a symbol of pride for the Iranian government.
WORLD
February 25, 2011 | By Julia Damianova, Los Angeles Times
Iran increased its stockpile of low-enriched uranium in recent months despite intense international pressure and claims that a computer virus had slowed its program, a report Friday by the U.N.'s nuclear watchdog agency indicates. At the beginning of February, according to the report prepared for the board of governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Iran had nearly 8,000 pounds of uranium enriched to 3.5%, a quantity sufficient for about three nuclear weapons if further enriched to 90%. The U.S. and its allies suspect Iran of seeking to develop atomic weapons; Iran contends that its program is for peaceful purposes only.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|