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December 26, 2010 | By Ellen Olivier, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Members of a cappella group Sweet Honey in the Rock were greeted with holiday wishes at a Champagne reception backstage after their Dec. 19 concert at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica. Actress Alfre Woodard said if her heart could sing, "that is the sound it would make. The music comes from the heart of women. I am uplifted and I grow strong from hearing it. " The group's mission, according to member Ysaye Maria Barnwell, is "preserving and extending the African American music traditions.
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SPORTS
August 7, 1994 | STEVE WILSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago, a spunky sprite with a 1,000-watt smile and a girl-next-door name, Mary Lou Retton, vaulted from the Los Angeles Olympics across television screens into the homes of millions of Americans who fell in love with her. Sweet 16, 4-feet-9, a red-white-and-blue, stars-and-stripes ball spinning through the air, she made an entire country cheer on Aug. 3, 1984, when she landed firmly on her feet and flung up her arms, absolutely sure of a perfect 10 that gave her the first U.S.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Tired and annoyed by all the alerts and red notification circles that keep appearing on your iPhone or iPad? Fortunately, you can easily turn them off or adjust them so they don't appear as often. Do Not Disturb A new feature on iOS 6 called Do Not Disturb lets you turn them off temporarily. It also shuts off text message alerts and phone calls when your device is locked unless a person calls you twice within three minutes, just in case it's an emergency. This feature is useful when you want to get some sleep or if you're trying to concentrate on work and don't want to be distracted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1988 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
It's Friday night at the drive-in. As the pale-skinned hero of the season's hot new martial-arts flick snaps the bones of the Asian archvillain, the Winnetka 6 erupts in honking horns and flashing headlights. The movie that has the big-wheeled pickups beeping is "Bloodsport." Advertised as the true story of an American who defeated all comers 13 years ago in a no-holds-barred international tournament of warriors, the movie opened last month at 800 U.S.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just another tragedy in family court. A young crack mother, desperate to conceal her pregnancy, had locked herself in a tenement bathroom and given birth to a three-pound boy. As she pushed, he fell to the floor and broke his skull. The mother abandoned him, like she had two previous babies. All were born addicted to crack. "Can we do anything about this woman?" asks Judge Judith Sheindlin, her voice taut with anger.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
In the late 1950s, Jimmy Swaggart was roaming around the back roads of Louisiana in a broken-down Chevrolet, earning about $40 a week from his preaching and gospel singing. He has come a long way since then. The controversial evangelist now heads a tax-exempt enterprise that ranks, by almost any measure, as one of the most successful of its kind. Jimmy Swaggart World Ministries and its Bible college boasted revenues of $150 million in 1987--more than $500,000 each working day.
NEWS
January 12, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop diva Janet Jackson is expected to sign a four-album contract today with Virgin Records worth an estimated $80 million--an unprecedented fee that analysts say could set the stage for another round of music industry mega-deals. The pact is the biggest ever awarded, surpassing the $60-million mark shared by such superstars as Michael Jackson and Madonna, whose six-album deals included film and joint-venture record label components.
TRAVEL
April 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The San Fernando Valley is 260 square miles of suburbia. Actually, make that suburbia on nutritional supplements. And antidepressants. With perhaps a little cosmetic surgery south of Ventura Boulevard, where the big money is. Or maybe - now that it's grown to more than 1.7 million people in nearly three dozen cities and neighborhoods rich and poor - the Valley isn't even a suburb anymore. It begins just 10 miles northwest of Los Angeles City Hall, sprawling west to the Simi Hills, north to the Santa Susana Mountains, and east to the Verdugo and San Gabriel mountains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Drew Birtness, the last straw came when he realized he was arresting the grandchildren of suspects he had picked up years ago. The Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy had been working the streets of East Los Angeles for 21 years, long enough to be hardened by the shootings and deaths and gangs--but also long enough to try something new. "I was tired of picking up kids' bodies off the street," he said.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Elias Lopez never had a chance. He got sucked into something so much stronger than he was, something with a history so powerful, that there seemed no choice but to submit. He was 17, a nice, quietly handsome young man with jet-black hair and a plan. He was going to be a cop, a narcotics investigator. Sure, there were street gangs in his neighborhood, but he did not want to join one. All Elias wanted to do was look like a gang member.
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