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NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you're a traveling touch-screen user, you may want to pack this stylish stylus. The Griffin Stylus/Pen/Laser Pointer ($49.99) is a rubber-tipped touch-screen stylus with a pen at the other end, and - here's the breakthrough - a cap that snaps over either end. As a bonus, a battery-powered push-button laser pointer is built into the cap, which also has a pocket clip. The ballpoint pen is refillable. Just what you need to interact with smaller screen elements while having ready access to writing and presentation tools.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | Thomas H. Maugh II
The electron microscope revolutionized biology in the 1930s by providing magnifications thousands of times higher than that of light microscopes, allowing scientists to discern the inner workings of cells for the first time. But it was not nearly as helpful for materials scientists such as the ones constructing electronic circuits, who were more interested in surfaces. Exploring the details of those circuits required a new technology, the scanning tunneling microscope, which would provide images of individual atoms on surfaces.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles has ruled that Microsoft Corp. will have to pay Alcatel-Lucent more than $500 million for infringing two patents. One patent covers how software users fill out forms. The other is related to using a stylus on a tablet computer. Judge Marilyn L. Huff denied Microsoft's request to reconsider the jury's decision.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you're an NFL lineman or a basketball player, Samsung has got the phone for you. The South Korean company's Galaxy Note II is a massive tablet/smartphone hybrid with a whopping 5.5-inch screen. Samsung bills the phone as having the best of both worlds, and with its massive display, you really do have more to see than other smartphones on the market. That makes it a solid choice if you're looking for something that you can use for reading books and magazines or playing video games.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Samsung announced that its next tablet, the Galaxy Note 10.1, will make its global debut later this month. The South Korean company said it will extend its Note brand with a stylus-ready tablet the size of the iPad by the end of August. It is to use the same Samsung S Pen stylus found on the Galaxy Note tablet/phone. The Galaxy Note 10.1 will have a 1.4 GHz quad-core processor and 2GB RAM, the company said. It also is to come with a 5-megapixel main camera and a 1.9 megapixel front-facing camera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | Thomas H. Maugh II
The electron microscope revolutionized biology in the 1930s by providing magnifications thousands of times higher than that of light microscopes, allowing scientists to discern the inner workings of cells for the first time. But it was not nearly as helpful for materials scientists such as the ones constructing electronic circuits, who were more interested in surfaces. Exploring the details of those circuits required a new technology, the scanning tunneling microscope, which would provide images of individual atoms on surfaces.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2009 | David Colker
At long last, details about a super-secret computer tablet have emerged, complete with pictures and even a video showing how it works. But it's not the long-awaited tablet that Apple Inc. has been rumored to be developing. This prototype reportedly comes from deep inside Apple's archrival, Microsoft Corp., where its development has supposedly been so blanketed in secrecy that many high-ranking company executives didn't know it existed. If it's real, that is. The device, code-named Courier, showed up on the popular technology blog Gizmodo.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you're an NFL lineman or a basketball player, Samsung has got the phone for you. The South Korean company's Galaxy Note II is a massive tablet/smartphone hybrid with a whopping 5.5-inch screen. Samsung bills the phone as having the best of both worlds, and with its massive display, you really do have more to see than other smartphones on the market. That makes it a solid choice if you're looking for something that you can use for reading books and magazines or playing video games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2001
Walter Stanton, 86, who invented an easily replaceable phonograph stylus that helped create a consumer market for audio equipment. Stanton invented the slide-in stylus in the 1940s. The design enabled users to replace a needle assembly instead of having to send a phonograph back to the factory when the assembly wore out. The invention became one of the basics in phonograph cartridge design.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stylus Furniture Inc., a Corona-based chain of 19 stores, has sought protection from its creditors in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in San Bernardino, the company said Tuesday. The company, which specializes in sales of custom-made modern furniture, filed a Chapter 11 bankruptcy petition on Monday. Chapter 11 allows a company to continue to operate while coming up with a plan to repay its debts.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Samsung announced that its next tablet, the Galaxy Note 10.1, will make its global debut later this month. The South Korean company said it will extend its Note brand with a stylus-ready tablet the size of the iPad by the end of August. It is to use the same Samsung S Pen stylus found on the Galaxy Note tablet/phone. The Galaxy Note 10.1 will have a 1.4 GHz quad-core processor and 2GB RAM, the company said. It also is to come with a 5-megapixel main camera and a 1.9 megapixel front-facing camera.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you're a traveling touch-screen user, you may want to pack this stylish stylus. The Griffin Stylus/Pen/Laser Pointer ($49.99) is a rubber-tipped touch-screen stylus with a pen at the other end, and - here's the breakthrough - a cap that snaps over either end. As a bonus, a battery-powered push-button laser pointer is built into the cap, which also has a pocket clip. The ballpoint pen is refillable. Just what you need to interact with smaller screen elements while having ready access to writing and presentation tools.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2009 | David Colker
At long last, details about a super-secret computer tablet have emerged, complete with pictures and even a video showing how it works. But it's not the long-awaited tablet that Apple Inc. has been rumored to be developing. This prototype reportedly comes from deep inside Apple's archrival, Microsoft Corp., where its development has supposedly been so blanketed in secrecy that many high-ranking company executives didn't know it existed. If it's real, that is. The device, code-named Courier, showed up on the popular technology blog Gizmodo.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles has ruled that Microsoft Corp. will have to pay Alcatel-Lucent more than $500 million for infringing two patents. One patent covers how software users fill out forms. The other is related to using a stylus on a tablet computer. Judge Marilyn L. Huff denied Microsoft's request to reconsider the jury's decision.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Hillary Clinton broke new ground in her race for the White House. Yet some iPhone users complain that when it comes to the hot gadget from Apple Inc., women are still being treated like second-class citizens. Apple, based in Cupertino, Calif., said this week that on July 11 it would give all iPhones a free software upgrade with new features. On the same day, it will start selling a new version, the iPhone 3G, that runs on a faster data network, includes a global positioning system and costs as little as $199.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | MARK A. KELLNER, mark@kellner2000.com
It's September--time for new TV shows, new cars, new fashions and a new Pocket PC operating system. At the DEMOmobile conference in La Jolla today, Hewlett-Packard is expected to introduce the $600 Jornada 565, the first in a wave of Pocket PC-compatible devices running version 4.0 of Microsoft's hand-held operating system. Some of the improvements in the device and the OS are more than skin deep.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some folks don't like making the transition from records to CDs, and Neil Maken can sympathize. He has little use for these newfangled digital microprocessors and lasers, and while you're at it, get out of here with those speakers, tubes and motors too. If it doesn't have a hand crank and a huge horn, Maken can't be bothered with it. Sometimes you can get some idea of the depth of a person's passions by scouting their periphery.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Hillary Clinton broke new ground in her race for the White House. Yet some iPhone users complain that when it comes to the hot gadget from Apple Inc., women are still being treated like second-class citizens. Apple, based in Cupertino, Calif., said this week that on July 11 it would give all iPhones a free software upgrade with new features. On the same day, it will start selling a new version, the iPhone 3G, that runs on a faster data network, includes a global positioning system and costs as little as $199.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2001
Walter Stanton, 86, who invented an easily replaceable phonograph stylus that helped create a consumer market for audio equipment. Stanton invented the slide-in stylus in the 1940s. The design enabled users to replace a needle assembly instead of having to send a phonograph back to the factory when the assembly wore out. The invention became one of the basics in phonograph cartridge design.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1995 | KARA SWISHER, WASHINGTON POST
Like so many people, employees at FTG Data Systems of Stanton are fixated on the O.J. Simpson trial. But they don't care so much about the dramatic testimony--what really interests them are the pens in the hands of the lawyers. Instead of employing the common mouse to manipulate computer-generated displays of evidence on video screens, prosecutors and defense lawyers are using light pens that FTG built and donated.
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