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Subatomic Particles

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SCIENCE
November 18, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have identified two new subatomic particles, called sigma-sub-b particles. The short-lived particles decay in a fraction of a second, the team said. The particles consisted of two up quarks, the smallest units of matter, and a bottom quark, while the second contained two down quarks and a bottom quark.
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SCIENCE
November 21, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Together, they contain a tiny fraction of the mass of a single electron. But the 28 neutrinos from deep space detected by an icy observatory beneath the South Pole promise a revolution in the study of the universe, scientists said Thursday. The elusive subatomic particles discovered by an international team of astrophysicists are the first ones from outside the solar system to be observed in 26 years, according to a report in the journal Science. The find opens a new window onto the universe, one that researchers say will usher in a new era of astronomy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Scientists have discovered a subatomic particle similar to the neutron that takes them a step closer toward confirming a theory explaining the basic structure of matter, researchers from the State University of New York said last week. The particle, known as the "neutral charmed strange baryon," had been predicted as long ago as 1974, but experiments conducted at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring confirmed its existence, said SUNY physicist Saj Alam.
SCIENCE
July 5, 2012 | Eryn Brown
In 2008, when faulty wiring closed down the $10-billion Large Hadron Collider for more than a year, many wondered whether physicists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research had a white elephant on their hands. But the revelation Wednesday that the collider's ATLAS and CMS detectors had found a new particle that could well be the long-searched-for Higgs boson would seem to put any lingering worries to rest. The LHC, as the collider near Geneva is known, has been amassing data at a rate no one thought possible even as recently as February, said Vivek Sharma, a UC San Diego physicist and member of the CMS research group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1987
The Chamberlain Creek barite mine near Magnet Cove in Hot Spring County, Ark., has been selected as the site for a proposed $21-million physics research project encompassing the world's largest device for detecting subatomic particles called neutrinos. The selection was made by scientists from six universities and a federal laboratory participating in the Gamma Ray and Neutrino Detector project, called GRANDE. If the project is approved, construction will take about three years.
NEWS
September 11, 1986 | United Press International
The elementary nature of matter and origins of the universe may be unlocked by physicists using a new high-capability computer system unveiled Wednesday at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The system developed at Fermilab will allow physicists to conduct experiments involving as many as 100 million independent events, said Thomas Nash, head of the Fermilab Advanced Computer Program.
NEWS
March 7, 1987 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Subatomic particles called neutrinos, which are so small that trillions are constantly passing through the Earth at nearly the speed of light without touching anything, have been detected by an experiment buried deep inside the French and Italian Alps, leading astronomers said Friday.
SCIENCE
July 5, 2012 | Eryn Brown
In 2008, when faulty wiring closed down the $10-billion Large Hadron Collider for more than a year, many wondered whether physicists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research had a white elephant on their hands. But the revelation Wednesday that the collider's ATLAS and CMS detectors had found a new particle that could well be the long-searched-for Higgs boson would seem to put any lingering worries to rest. The LHC, as the collider near Geneva is known, has been amassing data at a rate no one thought possible even as recently as February, said Vivek Sharma, a UC San Diego physicist and member of the CMS research group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1985 | KEAY DAVIDSON, Times Staff Writer
This week, UC San Diego physicists plan to start building a large device to detect hypothetical particles left over from the fiery birth of the universe. If successful, the project could hasten physicists' effort to find a theory unifying all physical forces, project leader George Masek said. The goal of the $125,000 project, which is 90% funded by the National Science Foundation, is to detect a magnetic monopole--a particle that has only one pole, north or south.
NEWS
July 23, 2001 | K.C. COLE
It's funny how the most intimate dilemmas can mirror the largest scientific questions. For example: Should the U.S. spend $5 billion or more on a new particle accelerator? And if so, what kind? The answer will turn, in part, on the same kind of considerations that go into deciding whether you should sign up for an experimental medical protocol, take a new job, make a pass at that girl. How much risk are you willing to take and at what cost?
SCIENCE
September 23, 2011 | By Eryn Brown and Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Albert Einstein had the idea. A century of observations have backed it up. It's one of the cornerstones of physics: Nothing travels faster than the speed of light. But now a team of experimental physicists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, says that one exotic particle possibly can. The scientists reached their conclusion after sending streams of tiny, subatomic particles called neutrinos hurtling from an accelerator at CERN outside Geneva to a detector at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy, about 450 miles away.
SCIENCE
April 7, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Physicists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have observed anomalous data that suggest they may have discovered a new elementary particle or a new fundamental force of nature. Or, they acknowledged Wednesday, they may have simply observed a chance statistical fluctuation in their results. If the results are real, they could provide the first significant change in what is known as the standard model of physics in more than five decades, and researchers are holding their breaths in anticipation.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
For the first time, physicists have confirmed that certain subatomic particles have mass and that they could account for a large proportion of matter in the universe, the so-called dark matter that astrophysicists know is there but that cannot be observed by conventional means. The finding concerns the behavior of neutrinos, ghost-like particles that travel at the speed of light. In the new experiment, physicists captured a muon neutrino in the process of transforming into a tau neutrino.
NEWS
November 19, 2006 | William Weir, Hartford Courant
Since 2001, when he delivered a paper on using lasers to manipulate space and time, Ronald Mallett has been one of the leading figures on the theory of time travel. Although time travel has been a lifelong goal for Mallett, a 61-year-old theoretical physicist at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, it took him a while to tell his colleagues. He eventually told a fellow physicist in 1998.
SCIENCE
November 18, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have identified two new subatomic particles, called sigma-sub-b particles. The short-lived particles decay in a fraction of a second, the team said. The particles consisted of two up quarks, the smallest units of matter, and a bottom quark, while the second contained two down quarks and a bottom quark.
BOOKS
April 11, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Merle Rubin is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Herman WOUK, who began his career as a novelist in the late 1940s, is now in his 89th year and still going strong. This is not to say that his new novel, "A Hole in Texas," is as brilliant as "The Caine Mutiny" or as powerful and ambitious as "The Winds of War" and "War and Remembrance," but it's certainly better than "Inside, Outside," his earlier foray into Washington politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1999 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Over the past five years, some physicists have increasingly embraced "string theories" that appear to defy common sense: Among other seeming absurdities, these theories would expand the universe into 11 dimensions and perhaps even dispense with space and time. What, one might ask, has led physicists to brazenly embrace such a bizarre scenario? Revolutions do not come lightly in physical law, and space and time will not go gently into the night.
BOOKS
April 11, 1993 | RICHARD EDER
Like Einstein, Mark Perdue is uncomfortable with the random and indeterminate character of modern particle physics. "God does not play dice with the universe," Einstein complained of certain aspects of quantum theory, and sought for a more a more sweeping and unifying concept. Perdue, a tenured professor at 27, makes a similar complaint. "All he did was keep trusting intuition," Louis B.
NEWS
July 23, 2001 | K.C. COLE
It's funny how the most intimate dilemmas can mirror the largest scientific questions. For example: Should the U.S. spend $5 billion or more on a new particle accelerator? And if so, what kind? The answer will turn, in part, on the same kind of considerations that go into deciding whether you should sign up for an experimental medical protocol, take a new job, make a pass at that girl. How much risk are you willing to take and at what cost?
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | K.C. COLE
It's a question probably asked by the first hairy proto-humans: What is the world really made of? By the end of the 20th century, physicists had managed to unravel atoms to their cores, unleashing the fire that fuels the stars and making possible modern technologies from PET scans to silicon chips. Using particle accelerators as high-powered "microscopes," they roamed around inner space, discovering entire families of tiny particles: electrons, neutrinos and quarks both "strange" and "charmed."
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