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NEWS
June 9, 1985
Reducing the intricate and complex system of the tarot to a fortune-telling device is about as inclusive and accurate as trying to prove that all surgeons are butchers or that all psychiatrists are neurotic. It is a shame that the tarot was viewed as a cheap card trick by Dick Roraback in his special feature article ("For Tell-All Tarot Readers, Past, Present and Future Are All in the Cards," May 26). I have a BA in psychology from a prestigious women's college and have been studying and working with the tarot for over 10 years.
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SCIENCE
September 11, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
To most people, the story of the placebo effect is simple: Because we believe that medicine makes us healthier, a pill - even if it is just sugar - causes us to feel better when we take it. As a result, the placebo effect has generally been considered a conscious process, the result of seeing the pill and the doctor in the white coat who gives it to us. But a new study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests...
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NEWS
December 25, 1990 | JAN HOFMANN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's time for Round 2 of holiday list-making, so toss out the Christmas list, find a clean sheet of paper and start making those New Year's resolutions. What'll it be this year? Losing weight? Giving up smoking? Starting a regular exercise program? Or maybe you're one of those people who don't need a new list. All you have to do is dig out last year's list of good intentions and hope that this year you'll have a better chance of turning them into accomplishments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010 | By Susan Emerling
"Liber Novus" is the name Carl Gustav Jung gave his autobiographical magnum opus -- an illuminated manuscript filled with images of hissing snakes, dazzling mandalas, bloody battles, radiating beings and a German text describing a man's loss and rediscovery of his soul -- before abandoning it midsentence in 1930 on the 189th page. An epilogue handwritten in 1959, which also leaves off midsentence, describes a 16-year effort that he acknowledges may "to the superficial observer appear like madness" but which he credits with saving him from "the overpowering force of the original experiences."
NEWS
February 12, 2008
Voters' minds: A headline with an article in Sunday's Section A about technologies designed to examine the subconscious of the electorate said that neurologists were involved in the pursuit. It is neuroscientists who are employing the technologies.
NEWS
November 8, 1987
"Beauty and the Beast" deserves high praise for its richness and honesty. Victor's (Ron Perlman) intensity, depth of feeling and wisdom pull at something deep--reaching inside our hearts with compassion and sensitivity. The concept of a secret life under the city parallels the subconscious mind, challenging us to greater introspection and greater love for our fellow man. Nancy Trowbridge, Tujunga
SCIENCE
September 11, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
To most people, the story of the placebo effect is simple: Because we believe that medicine makes us healthier, a pill - even if it is just sugar - causes us to feel better when we take it. As a result, the placebo effect has generally been considered a conscious process, the result of seeing the pill and the doctor in the white coat who gives it to us. But a new study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests...
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | LARRY PRYOR
--"Everyone who loves fashion has to have a touch of that step beyond," said a model who gave her name as Shailah as she toured the opening of the Fashion and Surrealism exhibit at New York's Fashion Institute of Technology. Dress for the opening was black tie or surreal, which Shailah acknowledged by wearing a half tuxedo-half wedding dress outfit sent over by Paris designer Bernard Perris.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1998 | DENISE GELLENE
Four men and three women sit in deep hypnotic trances, heads bent and eyes shut tight. A hypnotist speaks soothingly to the group, asking it to tap into its deepest feelings about . . . luggage. A man named Scott begins moving his hand from left to right, showing how he had recently tested the zipper on a black bag before buying it. "Get away!" he suddenly shouts. "Get away!" Prodded by the hypnotist, Scott explains that a luggage salesman had pestered him. "This guy . . .
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | CYNTHIA RICHMOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dear Cynthia: Lately my dreams are in different locations and include different people, but they have a common theme: I can't seem to get anything done. Typical of all of them is one I had last month. Our family is on vacation, and it is time to pack up and go home. But I just can't seem to start packing. I am surprised that I have taken so much for just a one-week trip. I get angry with some children who come over to play with my kids because they are interrupting the process.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
Voters' minds: A headline with an article in Sunday's Section A about technologies designed to examine the subconscious of the electorate said that neurologists were involved in the pursuit. It is neuroscientists who are employing the technologies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2005 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
You are getting sleepy ... sleepy. When I snap my fingers, you will open your eyes, read this article and find it utterly fascinating. Braving rain-splattered roadways, two dozen hypnotists invaded Long Beach on Saturday as part of HypnotizeAmerica .com, a multi-city campaign billed as "the largest mass hypnosis event" in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2000 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Folk music is not for the meek. It is neither simplistic nor passe. Bob Dylan has called it "old-timey music," but those ancient folk formulas inspired him and informed every subsequent generation of pop music, from Neil Young to Public Enemy to Radio-head. Yet folk as a genre is too often neglected. For 30 years, it was the mission of the "FolkScene" radio show to celebrate that legacy, right up until it was dropped from the KPFK-FM (90.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | CYNTHIA RICHMOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dear Cynthia: Lately my dreams are in different locations and include different people, but they have a common theme: I can't seem to get anything done. Typical of all of them is one I had last month. Our family is on vacation, and it is time to pack up and go home. But I just can't seem to start packing. I am surprised that I have taken so much for just a one-week trip. I get angry with some children who come over to play with my kids because they are interrupting the process.
NEWS
July 18, 1999 | JORDAN LITE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stephen King had written about 700 pages of the novel "It" when he got stuck. He went to bed frustrated, thinking about what should happen next. The answer emerged in a nightmare as scary as the horror story he was writing. King dreamed he was the little girl in the book, trapped in a creepy dump with discarded refrigerators that had leeches hanging inside. One flew out and sucked the blood from the girl's hand. The dream found its way into the novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the central figure in "Hurrah at Last," the new satire at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, Peter Frechette puts a desperate question to all his nearest and dearest: "How much money do you have?"
BUSINESS
January 15, 1998 | DENISE GELLENE
Four men and three women sit in deep hypnotic trances, heads bent and eyes shut tight. A hypnotist speaks soothingly to the group, asking it to tap into its deepest feelings about . . . luggage. A man named Scott begins moving his hand from left to right, showing how he had recently tested the zipper on a black bag before buying it. "Get away!" he suddenly shouts. "Get away!" Prodded by the hypnotist, Scott explains that a luggage salesman had pestered him. "This guy . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1997 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Poor American traveling salesman Howard Trapp. First a storm strands him in a mysterious house in the Swiss Alps, then his host cajoles him into putting his life on the line in "The Deadly Game." James Yaffe's play, adapted from a novel by Friedrich Durrenmatt, is hardly "Death of a Salesman" in quality. This production by the North Coast Repertory Theatre is a moralistic mystery. It doesn't make you think so much as it makes you think twice about booking a trip to Switzerland.
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