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BUSINESS
September 8, 1985 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
More than a year after the Ritz-Carlton's splashy grand opening, two building subcontractors are claiming that they still are owed nearly $1.3 million for work on the $100-million hotel. The contractors made their claims despite a financial settlement announced last week between the Ritz-Carlton Hotel and Stolte Inc., the hotel's Los Angeles-based general contractor. The two subcontractors said that Stolte owes them the money, but both have liens against the hotel as well.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Southern California's Metrolink commuter rail agency plans to replace a key subcontractor Friday in an attempt to keep on schedule a $211-million, state-of-the-art collision avoidance system. The passenger railroad's board of directors is expected to approve a $6.8-million contract to Wabtec Corp. for an important component of the "Positive Train Control" system that will help dispatchers keep track of trains on Metrolink's 500-mile network. Officials said the current subcontractor, ARINC, failed to meet deadlines and agreed to the change.
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WORLD
September 30, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Millions of dollars in American taxpayer funds may have been paid to Taliban fighters in southern Afghanistan to provide security for a U.S. development project, a government audit has found. The report, released Thursday by the inspector general of the U.S. Agency for International Development, says subcontractors hired to protect a development project near Jalalabad may have paid more than $5 million to the militants through local authorities. Allegations often have been made about such payments, but the report is a rare investigation by the government into a specific case.
OPINION
July 3, 2013
Re "Snowden lashes out from limbo," July 2 It seems that the U.S. government has already convicted Edward Snowden by denying him the use of his passport and by obstructing the fundamental human right to seek asylum from prosecution. The absence of any legal due process speaks volumes about how the government views itself - judge, jury and prosecutor - on any and all actions that may reveal the truth about its covert activities and schemes of privacy destruction, especially when they involve billions of dollars for its corporate subcontractors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Melanie Hicken and David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Glendale's housing manager was blunt with his concerns about giving a prominent developer $12.2 million to build low-income housing near the city's downtown. "I strongly recommend … not funding this project at anywhere near the level currently being requested," Mike Fortney wrote in an April 2008 letter to his boss. Glendale City Council members awarded the money anyway. The following year, they paid an additional $1.7 million for the project, dubbed Vassar City Lights, a five-story stucco building on San Fernando Road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2010 | By David Zahniser, Melanie Hicken and Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Two high-level state officials have frozen nearly $150,000 in campaign contributions raised for them by a low-income housing developer now accused of bilking government agencies. State Treasurer Bill Lockyer and state Controller John Chiang said they have put the money into separate accounts while they await the outcome of a federal probe into Advanced Development and Investment Inc. The company has built dozens of subsidized apartment complexes up and down the state with taxpayer money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1992
As much as I feel empathy for anyone making poor wages, I find it difficult to have sympathy for the immigrants involved in the drywall trade and the building industry in Southern California. In my opinion, the immigrants you describe in your articles have had a direct impact on the Southern California middle-class tradesmen and subcontractors. Wages and contract bids have been undercut by cheap labor and opportunistic subcontractors using and abusing immigrant labor to ultimately replace the higher paid skilled worker on many projects in this area.
REAL ESTATE
February 4, 1996
The first sentence of my letter, "Home Warranty May Survive Bankruptcy," Nov. 19, was deleted, conveying the mistaken impression that my advice in that paragraph was for the reader who questioned Robert J. Bruss about his rights against a bankrupt contractor. My advice--for purchasers of newly constructed homes--was that they obtain a copy of the builder's certificate of insurance for his general liability policy and a list of all subcontractors and design professionals before closing escrow.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1985 | JANE APPLEGATE and GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writers
Irvine-based Fluor Corp. filed a $40-million lawsuit Friday against a former contracts engineer, alleging that he received between $721,000 and $3 million in secret payments from subcontractors in Saudi Arabia during the three years he worked for Fluor. The suit, filed in federal court in Los Angeles, alleges that Thomas A. Belt, of Indian Rocks Beach, Fla.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1985 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
Five months after its gala opening, the $80-million Ritz-Carlton luxury resort hotel in Laguna Niguel faces troubles that its lavish decor, sweeping ocean views and growing clientele can't cure. The touted success and opulence of the hotel, which elicits "oohs" and "ahs" from first-time visitors, rankle many who helped to build the sprawling Mediterranean-style edifice, from the lagoon-shaped swimming pools to the marble-finished bathrooms in its 393 guest rooms.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Ikea Group, the world's biggest furniture retailer, will double its investment in renewable energy to $4 billion by 2020 as part of a drive to reduce costs as cash-strapped consumers become more price sensitive. The additional spending on projects such as wind farms and solar parks will be needed to keep expenses down as the company maintains its pace of expansion, Chief Executive Mikael Ohlsson said in an interview in Malmo, Sweden. "I foresee we'll continue to increase our investments in renewable energy," said Ohlsson, who plans to step down this year after 3 1/2 years at the helm.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- A critical report by a labor union-friendly research group distorts facts about how Wal-Mart Stores Inc. runs its massive national distribution network, the company said. The report released Wednesday by the National Employment Law Project said Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, has applied its aggressive cost-cutting to logistics, helping drive down pay and benefits for U.S. warehouse workers. The use of contractors and subcontractors represents a domestic "outsourcing" of warehouse operations that often relies on paid temporary workers, the report said, and the practice is being copied by Wal-Mart's competitors, Wal-Mart spokesman Dan Fogleman said that almost all of the centers  in the country are owned and operated by the company and not run by third-party logistics contractors.
OPINION
December 6, 2011 | By William M. LeoGrande and Peter Kornbluh
Two years ago, Cuban counterintelligence officers arrested Alan P. Gross, a U.S. Agency for International Development subcontractor, as he boarded a plane in Havana for the United States. Later convicted in a closed trial of crimes against the state for smuggling sophisticated telecommunications equipment into Cuba, Gross is serving a 15-year prison sentence. Obama administration officials have declared that relations with Cuba will remain frozen until Gross is released, but the administration has not been willing to take the aggressive steps necessary to win his freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2011 | By Melanie Hicken, David Zahniser and Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Money intended for the construction of a Los Angeles affordable-housing project instead was diverted to pay for a high-end renovation of a Glendale city councilman's condominium, according to a subcontractor who worked on both jobs. Ronald Chamberlain, owner of D & A Coating & Restoration of Fullerton, told The Times the FBI took records involving his work at the home of John Drayman, who lost his reelection bid for the Glendale City Council in April. He said agents also questioned him about Drayman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2011 | By Melanie Hicken, Los Angeles Times
A subcontractor for Advanced Development & Investment Inc. — an affordable-housing developer under federal investigation for alleged fraud — has filed a nearly $100,000 lien against former Glendale City Councilman John Drayman's condo for unpaid remodeling work, according to paperwork filed with the county. Glendale-based National Fire Systems & Services filed the lien April 25 with the Los Angeles County recorder, saying Drayman failed to pay a $98,222.48 bill for the renovations made after a water pipe burst in the residence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2011 | By Rich Connell, Los Angeles Times
Some 1,000 companies from around the globe, drawn by a bonanza of public funding allotted for California's proposed bullet train, descended Tuesday on the Los Angeles Convention Center angling for a piece of one of the biggest public works projects in American history. With state officials committed to breaking ground next year on a $43-billion Los Angeles-to-San Francisco high-speed rail link, would-be bidders from Asia, Europe and across the United States are lining up to compete.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- A critical report by a labor union-friendly research group distorts facts about how Wal-Mart Stores Inc. runs its massive national distribution network, the company said. The report released Wednesday by the National Employment Law Project said Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, has applied its aggressive cost-cutting to logistics, helping drive down pay and benefits for U.S. warehouse workers. The use of contractors and subcontractors represents a domestic "outsourcing" of warehouse operations that often relies on paid temporary workers, the report said, and the practice is being copied by Wal-Mart's competitors, Wal-Mart spokesman Dan Fogleman said that almost all of the centers  in the country are owned and operated by the company and not run by third-party logistics contractors.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1985 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Although the sudden cancellation of the Sgt. York anti-aircraft gun stunned the defense industry, the financial impact on the contractors involved in the program is likely to be minimal, according to subcontractors and Wall Street analysts surveyed Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2011 | By Gale Holland and Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles County district attorney's office has opened an investigation into an alleged conflict of interest on the part of a former community college official whose family business was paid more than $500,000 for working on a public construction program that she oversaw on her campus. Deputy Dist. Atty. Max Huntsman of the Public Integrity Division said the probe was launched in response to a complaint that Karen Hoefel, former vice president for administrative services at Mission College, had an "unlawful financial interest" arising from her co-ownership of a company that worked at the Sylmar campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2010 | By David Zahniser, Melanie Hicken and Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Two high-level state officials have frozen nearly $150,000 in campaign contributions raised for them by a low-income housing developer now accused of bilking government agencies. State Treasurer Bill Lockyer and state Controller John Chiang said they have put the money into separate accounts while they await the outcome of a federal probe into Advanced Development and Investment Inc. The company has built dozens of subsidized apartment complexes up and down the state with taxpayer money.
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