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Subic Bay Naval Base

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NEWS
June 10, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 15,000 American service personnel, dependents and civilians were ordered early today to evacuate Clark Air Base, one of the largest U.S. bases overseas, after a Philippines volcano dormant for six centuries began exploding with searing gases, thick ash and deadly debris. Lt. Col. Ron Rand, a spokesman at Clark, announced at 5 a.m.
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WORLD
November 8, 2005 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Angered over the alleged rape of a 22-year-old Filipina as she rode in a van with six U.S. Marines, demonstrators railed Monday against the presence of American troops in the Philippines. No charges have been filed in Wednesday's incident at the former Subic Bay naval base, but six Marines are being held by the U.S. Embassy in an undisclosed location. U.S. and Philippine officials are conducting separate investigations into allegations that the woman was raped and left by the side of the road.
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NEWS
September 16, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Philippines Senate today formally rejected a new military base treaty with the United States, plunging the Philippines into an economic and political crisis over the future of the Subic Bay Naval Base, America's last military outpost in Southeast Asia. The 12-11 vote by the Senate came a day after President Corazon Aquino announced that she will seek a national referendum to decide the base question, attempting to override the Senate action with a popular vote.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1993 | PRADNYA JOSHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you're left with a former U.S. Navy base complete with airport and modern facilities, at least 42,000 highly skilled workers and a lot of hope. What's a former mayor to do? Recruit businesses, says Richard Gordon. Gordon has a challenge that many American localities will soon face: converting a closed military facility to commercial use. But Gordon's story comes from thousands of miles across the Pacific at the former Subic Bay Naval Base in the Philippines.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | JIM MANN and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Members of the Philippine Senate cast a preliminary vote Monday to reject a new bases deal with the United States, raising the possibility that the 93-year U.S. military presence in the country will end when the current agreement expires next week. Bush Administration officials hope that Philippine President Corazon Aquino--who came to power with U.S.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Reuters
A U.S. Navy investigator has helped smash a ring that procured Filipino children as young as 4 as sex partners for foreigners, a Philippine prosecutor said Wednesday. Eight Filipinos have been implicated in the child prostitution ring, operating near the U.S. Subic Bay Naval Base north of Manila, prosecutor Nina Alcala said.
NEWS
August 30, 1988
Most Filipinos favor the retention of strategic U.S military bases in their nation but overwhelmingly believe Washington should pay more money in compensation, according to a government survey made public in Manila. The survey of 2,000 respondents nationwide showed that 80% favored keeping the bases, with 39% approving their continued presence without conditions and 41% saying the bases treaty should be revised, presidential press secretary Teodoro Benigno announced.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hundreds of U.S. Navy dependents who fled the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo volcano returned to Subic Bay Naval Base. American sailors, carrying bouquets of flowers and signs reading "Welcome Home," tearfully kissed wives and children who fled to the United States in June after the volcano swamped the dockyard under tons of ash and debris. A Navy spokesman said that about 4,000 more dependents are expected to return in the coming weeks out of the total of 6,500 who fled.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States and the Philippines signed a new military base agreement today, allowing U.S. forces use of Subic Bay Naval Base for 10 more years. Philippine Foreign Secretary Raul Manglapus and U.S. Ambassador Frank Wisner signed the treaty after 15 months of tortuous negotiations on the future of the nearly century-long American military presence in the former U.S. colony.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aquino Wants U.S. Base to Be Free Port: President Corazon Aquino has suggested turning Subic Bay Naval Base into a Hong Kong-style free port to cushion the impact on the economy of a U.S. military pullout. The base, a U.S. Seventh Fleet repair yard and ammunitions depot, could be "the nucleus of a growth center" in the Philippines, she said. Aquino said she has ordered a government panel to study ways of converting the 14,400-acre base from military to commercial use.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Ramos to Visit Taiwan: Philippine President Fidel Ramos plans an unofficial visit to Taiwan in April or May to promote investment in the former U.S. naval base at Subic Bay, the Commercial Times reported. Taiwan said it has tentatively approved a $20-million, low-interest loan for the Philippines to convert the former U.S. naval base into an industrial park.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With tears, cheers and a 21-gun salute on the windy shores of this scenic port, the United States bade a final emotional farewell Tuesday to Subic Bay, long its largest overseas military base, and formally closed a remarkable chapter in both American and Philippine history. At precisely 10 a.m., a Marine honor guard hauled down and crisply folded the American flag for the final time at the last U.S. base in America's former colony. Moments later, Philippine President Fidel V.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | Reuters
The United States lowered the American flag over its Subic Bay Naval Base for the last time Wednesday and formally handed over the giant complex to the Philippines. A steady drizzle drenched about 150 diplomats and military officials as a U.S. Navy band rang down the curtain on nearly a century of U.S. military presence at the base. "This is in some way a sad day," U.S. Ambassador Richard Solomon told the ceremony at the base's Tappan Park. ". . .
NEWS
September 29, 1992
A U.S. Navy honor guard will haul down the flag for the last time at the Subic Bay Naval Station on Wednesday as part of the planned withdrawal of all U.S. forces from the Philippines. The final few hundred sailors and Marines will move back to the adjoining Cubi Point Naval Air Station until they too leave on Nov. 24, ending more than a century of U.S. military presence in the country.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Disney Denies Plans for Subic Bay Theme Park: Walt Disney Co. denied that it has proposed building a new Disneyland theme park on the soon-to-be-abandoned U.S. naval base at Subic Bay in the Philippines. On Sunday, the head of the Philippine panel searching for an alternate use for the 98,000-acre site said Disney and Universal Studios wanted to build attractions there.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | Associated Press
The U.S. Navy will begin pulling out from its largest base in Asia by mid-May and will turn over the garrison to the Philippines by the end of the year, it was reported Sunday. The Stars and Stripes, the unofficial newspaper of the U.S. military, said the timetable was contained in a 13-page schedule of withdrawal distributed to commanders at Subic Bay Naval Base, 50 miles west of Manila. According to the newspaper, the Navy will start moving out of the main part of the base by mid-May. By Sept.
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