Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSubic Bay Treaty
IN THE NEWS

Subic Bay Treaty

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1991
Everyone concerned knows that there is no real sentiment in the Philippines to denounce the present agreement. However there is a larger question here: Do the Filipino people who have seen foreign soldiers on their soil every day of every year since 1564 deserve the opportunity to express themselves on the subject in a referendum uncluttered by the hysteria of "take or leave it" hype. In the meantime Washington, Manila, the American defense Establishment and the Philippine Senate should stop the grandstanding.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1991
It should be pointed out that the majority of Filipino senators who rejected the treaty granting the extension of the U.S. bases in the Philippines (front page, Sept. 16) did not do so because of anti-American sentiments but rather as a serious step toward self-determination. We are seeing for the first time in our nation's political history an august majority that finally took great courage against a politically suicidal move and the vexing and intimidating moods of U.S. foreign policy--real leaders unmindful of being elected and/or reelected into office by saying no to their traditional share of the corrupting largess of the mighty U.S. dollar.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | From Reuters
The Philippine Senate moved Saturday to the brink of rejecting a new treaty to lease Subic Bay Naval Base to the United States, but Washington said it remains optimistic that the accord will be ratified. The treaty, which allows the United States to keep Subic Bay for another 10 years, was close to defeat after eight senators signed a resolution declaring their opposition. The pact needs 16 votes in the 23-member Senate to be ratified.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | From Reuters
The Philippine Senate moved Saturday to the brink of rejecting a new treaty to lease Subic Bay Naval Base to the United States, but Washington said it remains optimistic that the accord will be ratified. The treaty, which allows the United States to keep Subic Bay for another 10 years, was close to defeat after eight senators signed a resolution declaring their opposition. The pact needs 16 votes in the 23-member Senate to be ratified.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Corazon Aquino, facing the Philippine Senate's almost-certain rejection of a new military bases treaty with the United States, called Sunday for the issue to be decided in a popular referendum. Aquino conceded in a nationally televised speech that rejection of the lease agreement for the Subic Bay Naval Base now seems likely. The Senate, which rejected the agreement in a preliminary 12-11 vote last Monday, is casting a final vote on the treaty today.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|