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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2000
It would be fair for George W. Bush to dismiss as "bizarre" allegations that his people inserted the "rats" subliminal message in his TV ad (Sept. 13). It would be fair, if it weren't true. Unfortunately, it is true; the Bush campaign did it and got caught. The only thing "bizarre" is how Bush plays the negative campaigning game, then sloughs off accountability. No more personal character assassination commercials against Al Gore either, please, GOP. Restore a decent level of civil discourse to this election.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood's full of interesting figures with dreams - struggling actors and writers who wait tables, walk dogs or sell insurance on the side. In the 1980s and early '90s, Leonard Mlodinow was likely one of the most unexpected: a theoretical physicist-turned-scriptwriter. When TV action hero MacGyver or the Starship Enterprise crew needed new dilemmas to solve, the UC Berkeley-trained scientist was there to supply them. "I just really loved films and thought I should be writing screenplays," said the bestselling science writer on a recent sunny afternoon at Caltech, where he's a lecturer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1990
Maybe they should change the name of Reno, Nev., to Salem, Mass. Know what I mean, or is that too subliminal for you? PATRICK MILLER Los Angeles The lawsuit against the band Judas Priest is being tried in Reno. The plaintiffs charge that two youngsters shot themselves after listening to a record containing subliminal suggestions of suicide.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Jasmine Elist, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even in the Age of Gaga it's still necessary to remind the world that female artists face barriers. Yes, women are free to wear a meat dress or express themselves in any artistic way imaginable, which is an important, tectonic shift from the rigidity of decades past — but they are still struggling to pierce the armor plating of art's most sacred institutions. According to feminist artist and educator Judy Chicago, only 3% to 5% of artwork on display in the permanent collections of most major museums is by a female artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1990
Teen-age suicide is caused by emotional pain and emptiness resulting from parental negligence and/or abuse. Not by drugs! Or alcohol! And certainly not by subliminal lyrics. IAN M. DAVIS Huntington Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1992
I hope I'm not the only one who noticed that of your four essays on screen violence, the two "violence is OK" essays were by men and the two "violence is not OK" were by women. Is this a subliminal statement? GERALD RHOADES Agoura Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1990
Mike Boehm's apologetic for Ozzy Osbourne (Oct. 4) ignores the central issues in the case--intent and consent. If, as the plaintiffs assert, there is subliminal material effectively encouraging suicide in the album, how can that material be protected by the First Amendment? Artistic expression is clearly protected. In fact, Ozzy might be safe from prosecution had he titled his album "Why and How to Commit Suicide." Customers would know what they are buying. Subliminal messages are not artistic expression, by either the artist's or the listeners' standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990
In his film "Avalon," director Barry Levinson casts four non-Jews in the major roles. And although there is a subliminal Jewish star at a cemetery, the word Jew is not used once in the movie. Where were the Jewish actors? Martin Scorsese unabashedly casts Italians as Italians in "GoodFellas." He loves his paisani so well he casts them in all the roles. He's not worried what others might think. I don't know why Levinson chose this path. It awakens in me all those ancient fears that if the Gentiles know who the Jews really are they will drive us out of this country.
MAGAZINE
December 9, 1990
I disagree with what Harry Shearer was trying to get across to readers when he wrote "Tube-tied" (Oct. 28). The problem is regulating what children watch; if we don't, who will? Shows for children, especially those shown at school, should be screened. Millions of taxpayers are not willing to give up money to have their kids going to school to watch television. Christoper Whittle and company may be paying for the VCRs and televisions, but who is paying for the teachers' to "teach" the children?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1988
Along with thousands of other readers, I was appalled at the incidents described in the articles. Furthermore, this is not the first time this brand of "music" has taken center stage in a human tragedy. Teen-agers frequently seek a cause celebre and young, pliable minds are receptive to all manner of subliminal influence. Though they naturally had no knowledge of the crimes perpetrated, I nevertheless hold the producers and writers of this "thrash" music culpable. At least partly.
OPINION
July 9, 2011 | Gregory Rodriguez
Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky's office released a mildly amusing list of 53 suggestions for surviving "Carmageddon," one for every hour the 405 will be closed this weekend between the 10 and the 101. In the hope that you'll stay off the streets — please! for God's sake! — the list suggests planting a tree, shopping online (from county-based stores, of course), throwing a block party. What it doesn't do is encourage Angelenos to appreciate our freeway system and to imagine for a moment what the city would be like without what historian Kevin Starr has called "absolute masterpieces of engineering.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2011 | By Jason Gelt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Today, you can't escape punk rock ? the style, iconography and chord changes are as accessible as Hot Topic and top-40 radio. But punk continues to draw its power from the scene of the late 1970s and early '80s, particularly here in Southern California, and to build on its legacy as a savage underground protest music and an art movement that refused to be defined by money. On Friday, art gallery Subliminal Projects opens a new show of photography, art and ephemera called "Too Fast to Live, Too Young to Die," which throws open the chaotic energy of an early punk scene that included such bands as Black Flag, the Minutemen, Redd Kross, Bad Religion, the Germs and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2003 | Jonathan M. Katz, Associated Press
"People have told me straight up to my face: 'Man, you're a fascist,' " says Subliminal, Israel's hip-hop king. In spite of -- or perhaps because of -- such controversy, the 24-year-old rapper's mix of hip-hop attitude and right-wing politics has become an anthem for young Israelis hungry for a secular Jewish identity and confused by years of harsh conflict with the Palestinians. Kobi Shimoni and partner Yoav Eliasi -- a.k.a.
WORLD
August 25, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep within a Russian television advertisement for a local beer, Klinskoye, lurked a split-second message for another thirst-quencher: Pepsi. An image of Palmolive Fruit Essentials soap was there and gone in a blink on the NTV television network. Young viewers of Russian MTV unconsciously absorbed marketing messages for Secret deodorant, the New Musical Express newspaper and the Red Hot Chili Peppers album, "By the Way."
NEWS
October 25, 2001 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Go to almost any classroom and, within minutes, you're likely to hear a frazzled teacher say: "Let's pay attention." But researchers have long known that it's not always necessary to pay attention to something in order to learn it. Now a team of scientists at Boston University have taken that idea a step further, concluding that it's possible to learn from information that's imperceptible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2000 | ANDREW TONKOVICH, Andrew Tonkovich teaches at UC Irvine and Irvine Valley College
"You're not voting George W., are you?" asks my neighbor. "I'd rather eat rats," I say. "Like on 'Survivor.' " "Democrat, huh?" He looks me over for the Mark of the Beast. "No," I say. "Green. Voting Nader." "Can you do that here?" he asks. Being Green in Orange County means being voted off the island by the Democrats and the Republican rats together and, unwilling to play "Who Wants to Be a Social Darwinist?" on their "Gilligan's Island," embracing the protest vote. Protest.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1990
Peter Rainer's commentary on film noir ("Out of the Past, Darkly," April 8) is welcome recognition of an emerging post- noir crop of films and pays overdue homage to this unique American style. However, he overlooked the core noir theme: no moral center within the characters. Whether it was a result of postwar knowledge of man's inhumanities or anxiety that their jobs were being stolen by women, the returning soldiers brought subliminal paranoia and feelings of alienation back with them that permeated the culture and created a vacuum of values.
BOOKS
April 23, 1989 | ALEX RAKSIN
THE WANT MAKERS The World of Advertising: How They Make You Buy by Eric Clark (Viking: $19.95; 416 pp.) We can believe British journalist Eric Clark when he claims to be "pro-advertising"; his interest in the trade, after all, was sparked when he helped launch a magazine for the industry. Like so many authors who have tackled this subject before, however, Clark ends up assuming a highly critical tone. This is, no doubt, unavoidable, for the basic premise of advertising--evading our intellect (which might remind us that all soap is the same)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2000
I wish that Alison Feit, in her Sept. 15 commentary claiming that subliminal messages can have powerful effects on human behavior, had cited peer-reviewed journals. Contrary to her claim, I think such a belief has a perverse appeal to Americans, who are quite superstitious. PAUL TRACY Oceanside Re "Media Target 'Trivial Issues,' Cheney Says," Sept. 14: Now Dick Cheney is criticizing the press for focusing on "absolutely trivial issues" that "really have nothing to do with the election or the fate of America"--namely George W. Bush's vulgar insult of a reporter, Cheney's abysmal voting record and Republicans' use of a subliminal message in an ad. Cheney says reporters do this because Medicare, the military and other complicated topics are "hard stuff to cover."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2000
It would be fair for George W. Bush to dismiss as "bizarre" allegations that his people inserted the "rats" subliminal message in his TV ad (Sept. 13). It would be fair, if it weren't true. Unfortunately, it is true; the Bush campaign did it and got caught. The only thing "bizarre" is how Bush plays the negative campaigning game, then sloughs off accountability. No more personal character assassination commercials against Al Gore either, please, GOP. Restore a decent level of civil discourse to this election.
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