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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- Two people were in custody at the Navy submarine base here after a report on base of a "suspicious person armed with a handgun," officials said. Base personnel were told around 10:50 a.m. Thursday to "shelter in place. " The order has since been lifted. There were no reports of any shots being fired. The incident was under investigation by base police and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. ALSO: Twitter critics take on LAPD after NY police hit on social media Teenage girl killed in walk-up shooting at apartment; gunman at large After secret air surveillance of Compton, mayor wants protections tony.perry@latimes.com Twitter: @LATsandiego  
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Tony Perry
  SAN DIEGO -- Two enlisted sailors were taken into custody Thursday after a report of "suspicious behavior" involving a gun touched off a "shelter-in-place" order to personnel at the Point Loma submarine base. The two were using airsoft pistols to fire from their barrack's window at a mirror on an adjacent structure, the Navy said. Airsoft pistols fire pellets and often have a realistic appearance. Someone saw one of the pistols and made an emergency call that led to the "shelter in place" order, the Navy said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Tony Perry
  SAN DIEGO -- Two enlisted sailors were taken into custody Thursday after a report of "suspicious behavior" involving a gun touched off a "shelter-in-place" order to personnel at the Point Loma submarine base. The two were using airsoft pistols to fire from their barrack's window at a mirror on an adjacent structure, the Navy said. Airsoft pistols fire pellets and often have a realistic appearance. Someone saw one of the pistols and made an emergency call that led to the "shelter in place" order, the Navy said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- Two people were in custody at the Navy submarine base here after a report on base of a "suspicious person armed with a handgun," officials said. Base personnel were told around 10:50 a.m. Thursday to "shelter in place. " The order has since been lifted. There were no reports of any shots being fired. The incident was under investigation by base police and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. ALSO: Twitter critics take on LAPD after NY police hit on social media Teenage girl killed in walk-up shooting at apartment; gunman at large After secret air surveillance of Compton, mayor wants protections tony.perry@latimes.com Twitter: @LATsandiego  
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- The gun scare at the Point Loma submarine base that led to a "shelter in place" order was caused when an enlisted sailor playfully pointed an air pistol out of a barracks window, the base commander said Thursday. The sailor was firing the pistol at a mirror in a parking lot when someone saw the gun and made a report of a "suspicious person with a gun," said Capt. Scott Adams. That led to the "shelter in place" order and brought base security, the FBI and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service rushing to the scene.
SPORTS
July 3, 1987 | Associated Press
Ens. David Robinson, the National Basketball Assn.'s top draft choice, reported Thursday to the U.S. Naval Submarine Base here to begin serving a two-year military commitment in the Navy's Civil Engineer Corps. Robinson, a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, will be playing in the Pan American Games later this month, but his commanding officer, Capt. Kent Riffey, said: "We haven't talked about basketball yet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2002 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Border Patrol agents in San Diego arrested 10 suspected illegal immigrants who were working at the Point Loma Submarine Base, authorities said Monday. The arrestees, whose names and nationalities were not immediately made available, were employed by a private firm that had been hired by a separate Navy contractor, officials said. The workers were chipping and painting on a dry dock at the base and were not aboard a Navy ship, officials said.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | JESSICA BALDWIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Cold War thaw has reached Holy Loch in the remote Scottish Highlands, where America's Poseidon submarines are pulling up anchor and taking half a town's population with them. The 4,300 local residents and the 4,000 U. S. sailors and their dependents knew that the thaw, coupled with the advent of the Trident submarines, would mean that the submarine repair and refit base would go. But the announcement in early February that Holy Loch would close sometime next year was still a blow.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2005 | Josh Getlin and Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writers
Two hundred yards from the nation's oldest submarine base, the day manager of Golden Gate Pizza could barely focus on who had ordered pasta and who wanted the pastrami grinders. As with just about everyone else in Groton, Tina Way was reeling from the news that the base might be shut down. All she could think about was what a huge blow that would be for every layer of this community. "It will be devastating," Way said. "These people [at the base] are like family to us."
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to rebuild U.S.-Chinese military ties and reduce tensions over a confrontation in international waters in October, a U.S. Navy cruiser sailed into this important northern naval base Wednesday on a friendly port call, the first by Americans since 1989. Rear Adm. Bernard J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- The gun scare at the Point Loma submarine base that led to a "shelter in place" order was caused when an enlisted sailor playfully pointed an air pistol out of a barracks window, the base commander said Thursday. The sailor was firing the pistol at a mirror in a parking lot when someone saw the gun and made a report of a "suspicious person with a gun," said Capt. Scott Adams. That led to the "shelter in place" order and brought base security, the FBI and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service rushing to the scene.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2005 | John Hendren and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
Early each morning, the South Dakotans met in a Starbucks in the lobby of a suburban Washington hotel, then fanned out along two escalators and in the foyer of a meeting room two floors below. From their strategic locations, Republican Sen. John Thune, GOP Gov. Michael Rounds and Democratic Rep. Stephanie Herseth buttonholed commissioners arriving, fresh from breakfast, to the final meetings of the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2005 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
The commission deciding the future of U.S. military bases voted Wednesday to block the proposed shutdown of two major installations in New England, a major reversal for a Pentagon plan that critics said would have "demilitarized" the Northeast.
WORLD
August 14, 2005 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
To drive the coastal highway of this port city on the Bering Sea or to go out to its airport is to navigate an obstacle course of potholes, bouncing past blocks of crumbling apartment buildings. Compensating for the jarring ride is the natural beauty of Avacha Bay and the two majestic volcanoes that overlook this once-closed provincial capital.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
To Glenn Gauvin, it made no sense to close the nation's oldest military shipyard. So Gauvin, 41, joined more than 3,000 other supporters of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard on Wednesday to press their case before an independent review panel. Many made the 90-minute trip to Boston in a caravan of about 50 school buses. In yellow "Save Our Shipyard" T-shirts, the Portsmouth contingent filled nearly every seat in a cavernous convention center ballroom here.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2005 | Josh Getlin and Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writers
Two hundred yards from the nation's oldest submarine base, the day manager of Golden Gate Pizza could barely focus on who had ordered pasta and who wanted the pastrami grinders. As with just about everyone else in Groton, Tina Way was reeling from the news that the base might be shut down. All she could think about was what a huge blow that would be for every layer of this community. "It will be devastating," Way said. "These people [at the base] are like family to us."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1985
A sailor on a motorcycle died Sunday after hitting a guardrail on Nimitz Boulevard, authorities said. Francisco Solorzano, 21, was pronounced dead at 5:15 p.m., about 30 minutes after he lost control of his motorcycle on a curve and struck the rail just south of Evergreen Street, said coroner's deputy Chuck Bolton. Solorzano, a native of Texas, was stationed at the Navy submarine base on Point Loma, Bolton said.
NATIONAL
May 14, 2005 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
Even though the list of recommended military base closings was presented Friday as being free of politics, it quickly had plenty of political ramifications. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) found himself on the defensive, trying to explain how an Air Force base in his state ended up on the list.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2002 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Border Patrol agents in San Diego arrested 10 suspected illegal immigrants who were working at the Point Loma Submarine Base, authorities said Monday. The arrestees, whose names and nationalities were not immediately made available, were employed by a private firm that had been hired by a separate Navy contractor, officials said. The workers were chipping and painting on a dry dock at the base and were not aboard a Navy ship, officials said.
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