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BUSINESS
March 28, 2008 | Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writer
Just as consumers now pay for HBO, they may one day be charged for a digital music service as part of their monthly Internet bill. After resisting subscription services out of fear they would weaken CD sales, music companies are considering the idea in an attempt to reverse plummeting sales and unabated illegal downloading of music from the Internet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Joe Flint
HBO has cut a deal to sell reruns of many of its hit shows to Amazon.com Inc.'s Prime Instant Video platform. Among the programs  that will be made available on Amazon's Prime Instant Video streaming service are "The Sopranos," "Six Feet Under," "The Wire," "Girls" and "Veep. " The agreement also covers HBO's miniseries including "Band of Brothers" and original movies such as "Game Change. " As part of the pact, HBO's online streaming service HBO Go will also be available on Amazon's new Fire TV settop box the end of the year.
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BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. upended the Internet with its search engine. It launched its own email service, made roads and highways easier to navigate, developed the world's most popular operating system for mobile devices and took a shot at Apple Inc.'s iTunes with its own Google Play store. Now the technology giant is cranking up the volume with the debut of a subscription music service that provides access to millions of songs for a monthly fee, taking on the likes of Spotify and Pandora and going after the next big wave in digital music: streaming on mobile devices.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Jon Healey
The Obama administration on Tuesday put a former top Microsoft executive in charge of HealthCare.gov, the troubled website serving 36 states' insurance-buying marketplaces. Insert your joke about Obamacare's blue screen of death here. Seriously, one has to hope the new guy -- Kurt DelBene, former head of the Microsoft Office Division -- brings only a portion of Microsoft's heritage along with him. Aside from the XBox, the software giant isn't known for great consumer experiences.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Music publishers and major record labels are closing in on a deal to authorize online subscription services, potentially opening a new era in music distribution. Online subscriptions are the labels' long-awaited response to the wildly popular--and arguably unlawful--networks that let consumers make free copies of hit songs through the Net. But the labels couldn't move forward without permission from the publishers, which are entitled to royalties when their songs are reproduced.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2004 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
It took awhile for Christopher Swann to get used to shelling out a monthly fee for something he had paid for already. "It was a bit strange," the 34-year-old financial analyst said of the TiVo digital video recorder he bought last year. The device itself set him back $249, but he has to fork over a monthly $12.95 to keep recording his favorite television shows. "Every month, you're paying to use this product."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Video-rental giant Netflix last week announced a two-year licensing deal with CBS that will make a host of recent and ancient series ? including such CBS-distributed series as "Twin Peaks," which aired on ABC, and "Cheers" and "Star Trek," from NBC ? available to stream. It joins Amazon.com, now offering "unlimited instant videos" to its Prime members (who pay a premium for free, faster shipping of solid objects) and Hulu's Hulu Plus, which makes available scores of current and back-catalog series from part-owners NBC, ABC and Fox, among others, in a brewing war of video subscription services.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013 | By Joe Flint
CBS' acclaimed legal drama "The Good Wife" will have multiple partners in syndication. Reruns of the Sunday night program, which stars Julianna Margulies, have been sold by CBS to Amazon's Prime Instant Video platform as well as the Hallmark Channel and local TV stations. Hulu Plus, the subscription arm of the online video service, will also get episodes as part of a previous deal with CBS.  The unique agreement could mean an even longer life on CBS for "The Good Wife," which wraps up its fourth season next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Measurement firm Nielsen has begun tracking the viewing habits of some 5 million American households that receive entertainment on Internet-connected devices and television sets. It's a group Nielsen dubs the "Zero TV" households, though that fails to precisely describe this group of viewers who are mainly younger than age 35 and childless. The vast majority -- some 75% -- own at least one television, but these sets are connected to the Internet, not to a cable or satellite service.  These nontraditional TV viewers surveyed as part of the latest Cross-Platform Report from Nielsen cited cost and lack of interest as the main reasons for not subscribing to a traditional pay TV service.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2003 | From Bloomberg News, Reuters
Yahoo Inc. said it would launch two video subscription services Monday, streaming coverage of news, entertainment and live sporting events. A $9.95-a-month entertainment service will include clips from the television show "Survivor," while a $16.95-a-month service will focus on sports, Yahoo said. Internet companies are counting on consumer subscription services to make up for a decline in advertising revenue. AOL Time Warner Inc.'s America Online service and RealNetworks Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The idea of a "Netflix for books" e-book service is too delicious to resist. Amazon has a version, its Kindle Lending Library. Oyster launched a high-profile e-book subscription service in October. That same month Scribd, which has been putting large documents on the Web since 2007, launched an e-book subscription service too. Who can make it work? What kind of model is best? On Monday, a new company, Entitle , entered the fray. People who sign up with Entitle pay a monthly fee and get a few books a month -- two books for $14.99, three for $21.99, and four books for $27.99.  That price point is something publishers can be comfortable with.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Half a year after launching for Android, Google Play Music All Access is now available to iPhone users. An app for Google Play Music became available for download for iPhone users on Friday. The app gives users access to All Access, Google's subscription service, and also lets them stream music they own that they have uploaded onto Google's cloud. All Access is a rival to other music subscription services, notably Spotify and Rdio. But unlike those other services, iPhone users have not been able to use All Access on their devices until now. PHOTOS: Google barge to be 'unprecedented artistic structure' To promote the service, Google says new users can get a free 30-day trial of the service.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
YouTube is poised to launch a subscription music service as soon as December, positioning it to compete with Spotify, Rdio and other digital offerings, according to people familiar with the matter. The Internet's dominant online video already is the most popular on-demand music offering in the world.  YouTube even has surpassed radio as the leading way teens and young adults listen to songs.  A subscription service would seek to build YouTube's strength in digital music.  YouTube users already can watch an unlimited number of music videos through an application on their mobile devices, as well as through a browser on their computers.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll The subscription service would offer additional features, such as a commercial-free experience and the freedom to store music on a mobile device to listen when not connected to the Internet, according to people with knowledge of the matter who were not authorized to speak publicly.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
In a bid to spur digital movie purchases, Sony Pictures has struck a deal with Wal-Mart's Vudu video streaming service to add video sharing and other features to new releases including "This Is the End" and "After Earth" as well as forthcoming titles such as "Smurfs 2" and "One Direction. " The feature, dubbed Vudu Extras+, will enable consumers who've bought a movie through the online service - or deposited a copy in their digital storage locker - to search for scenes or lines of dialogue, or clip and share a film vignette on Facebook or Twitter.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2013 | By Meg James
Spanish-language radio star Eddie "Piolín" Sotelo is borrowing a page from Howard Stern. Three weeks after severing ties with Univision Radio, Sotelo has made a deal to bounce to SiriusXM satellite radio. This fall, Sotelo will launch a Spanish-language entertainment channel on the subscription service called Piolín Radio, which will be anchored by a live four-hour morning program that Sotelo will broadcast from Los Angeles. "I am honored SiriusXM believes in me," Sotelo, whose nickname means "Tweety Bird," said in a statement.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google jumped into the music subscription market last week with Google Music All Access, escalating the competition in a crowded market. Although Google brings the biggest name to the market, many others already have large followings. Spotify stands out as the leader of the pack. Waiting in the wings may be Apple, which is rumored to be looking at a subscription service as well. With so many choices, it can be hard to figure out which service to subscribe to. Here's a quick guide that might help.
OPINION
February 4, 2008 | By Jon Healey
In a move telegraphed months ago, Yahoo announced today that it was terminating its subscription music service and throwing its support behind Rhapsody, a competing service operated by RealNetworks and MTV Networks. The deal leaves Rhapsody, Napster and Microsoft's Zune Pass as the last subscription services standing, with Zune Pass being available only to consumers who buy a Zune MP3 player. Previous casualties include MTV's Urge, AOL's MusicNet, Sony Music and Universal Music Group's Pressplay, and Circuit City's MusicNow.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2000 | From Reuters
Loudeye Technologies Inc., whose software makes it easier to convert audio and pictures on the Web, Tuesday unveiled a new service to give Web sites and online music retailers access to tens of thousands of song clips. The service, called Loudeye Media Subscription Services, is part of the company's push from simply converting audio and video into Web-ready formats to helping distribute the content over the Internet.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. upended the Internet with its search engine. It launched its own email service, made roads and highways easier to navigate, developed the world's most popular operating system for mobile devices and took a shot at Apple Inc.'s iTunes with its own Google Play store. Now the technology giant is cranking up the volume with the debut of a subscription music service that provides access to millions of songs for a monthly fee, taking on the likes of Spotify and Pandora and going after the next big wave in digital music: streaming on mobile devices.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Twitter Inc. says its new music service helps users discover songs and artists. But the music industry isn't sure it's something to sing about just yet. The #Music app recommends songs based on the artists Twitter users follow. It also shows what tracks friends are tweeting about. And it lets users browse songs that are popular or up-and-coming on the service. The user can preview the tracks from iTunes or subscribe to Spotify or Rdio to listen to full-length versions of the suggested songs.
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