Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSubsidence
IN THE NEWS

Subsidence

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
A sinkhole, apparently caused by severe storms that overwhelmed an old sewer pipe, swallowed part of a hotel parking lot Monday, killing two people. One of the dead was Victoria Vaynshteyn, 26, whose car was swallowed up by the sinkhole as she drove to her job at the Courtyard by Marriott hotel. The other victim, Oscar Cano, was a restaurant worker at the hotel.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Andrew Khouri
Most Californians can't afford their rent. The state's affordability crisis has worsened since the recession, as soaring home prices and rents outpace job and income growth. Meanwhile, government funds to combat the problem have evaporated. Local redevelopment agencies once generated roughly $1 billion annually for below-market housing across California, but the roughly 400 agencies closed in 2012 to ease a state budget crisis. In addition, almost $5 billion from state below-market housing bonds, approved by voters last decade, is nearly gone.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN and MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Subway tunneling beneath the Hollywood Freeway was temporarily halted Tuesday while transit engineers attempted to determine what has caused three spots to sink slightly more than a level permitted by Caltrans. Metropolitan Transportation Authority officials characterized the problem near Universal City as a minor setback. The officials said at a news conference they should be able to quickly determine the cause of sinkages and make corrections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Martha Groves
From the balcony of her Crescent Drive apartment, Shari Able takes in the luxurious view - a picture-postcard panorama of the homes of Beverly Hills. Her home sits above a Whole Foods stocked with organic kabocha squash and Dungeness crabs. Rodeo Drive's boutiques are a brisk walk away. But the 74-year-old is quick to warn elderly suitors who think her 90210 ZIP Code means a cushy bank account. Her federally subsidized apartment costs her roughly $200 a month, she said. "I told one guy from Long Beach, 'I live in Beverly Hills, but it's the only HUD building in Beverly Hills,'" Able recalled one morning over coffee and madeleines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1995 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Subway tunneling in Hollywood was shut down again Wednesday after it was determined that the ground had sunk more than 1 1/2 inches in some spots, but transit officials said they hope to resume work on the troubled project in about a week. As required by new rules, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority automatically halted work when subsidence reached slightly more than 1 1/2 inches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 75-foot section of a Hollywood Freeway offramp, undermined by subway tunneling, has sunk three inches, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority said Wednesday. The sinkage is nine times greater than the MTA's contract with the tunnel construction firm estimated it would be, but within the level allowed by the permit. The offramp and the freeway are still safe for drivers however, a Caltrans spokeswoman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Areas in the Antelope Valley have sunk nearly six feet since 1930 and no one knows how long or at what rate the region will continue to drop, according to the U. S. Geological Survey. Known as subsidence, the irreversible sinking is the result of ground-water pumping, USGS scientists said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1990 | BILL BILLITER
Seeking to ease concerns that oil drilling could renew problems with sinking land in this beach city, Mayor Thomas J. Mays said there are no major difficulties now even though some parts of the city sank noticeably several decades ago. The sinking of land and beach was caused by massive oil drilling from 1920 to 1970. As the oil was withdrawn, land gradually shifted to a lower elevation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1990 | BILL BILLITER
Is the city still sinking because of underground oil removal? That question will be the focus of a new study committee named by the City Council. After months of getting sometimes conflicting information about sinking ground levels--a phenomenon formally called "subsidence"--the council unanimously voted Monday to appoint a 10-member Subsidence Committee. Huntington Beach was once one of the world's major active oil fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the bureaucratic equivalent of a hat dance, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority agreed Tuesday to rebuild the El Sombrero nightclub on Lankershim Boulevard without admitting that the MTA's subway tunneling caused its floor to sink up to 13 inches. Club owner Isabel Lopez said she was delighted to learn of the offer on Tuesday from Charles Stark, the MTA's Red Line project manager, but remained skeptical and anxious. "There's no documents, it's all word of mouth so far," she said.
OPINION
January 5, 2014 | By George P. Shultz, Scott W. Atlas and John F. Cogan
As the acute problems of the Affordable Care Act become increasingly apparent, it also has become clear that we need new ways of ensuring access to healthcare for all Americans. We should begin with an examination of health insurance. Insurance is about protecting against risk. In the health arena, the risk at issue is of large and unexpected medical expenses. The proper role of health insurance should be to finance necessary and expensive medical services without the patient incurring devastating financial consequences.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Toward the end of September, I found myself in a meeting room at Brooklyn Borough Hall in New York with planners from a variety of book fairs (Miami, Trinidad, Texas, Australia) discussing audience and cooperation and outreach. It was the morning after the Brooklyn Book Festival, which had drawn tens of thousands, and the atmosphere was upbeat, marked by excitement, even relief. Economics remained an issue (how to attract and pay for writers, how to advertise and promote) but there was no lamenting, no sense that things might be shutting down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2013 | By Melanie Mason and Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO - Facing the prospect of a prolonged federal government shutdown, Gov. Jerry Brown will soon need to decide if the state will shoulder the cost to keep running federal programs used by millions of Californians. State officials say there's no guarantee that critical social services in California - such as food stamps, subsidized school meals and nutrition assistance for pregnant women and infants - could run without interruption in November. The Brown administration has not yet said if it plans to plug the gaps for social programs at the end of the month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Of the many issues hanging over the proposal to burrow enormous tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and replumb the hub of California's water system, the one most likely to make or break the $25-billion project is money. Just who, exactly, is going to pay for it? The San Joaquin Valley irrigation districts and urban water agencies in Southern California and the San Francisco Bay Area that get water supplies from the delta have promised to pick up most of the tab, with federal and state taxpayers paying the rest.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2013 | By Jonathan Kaiman
BEIJING - If Nicole Zhou reflects how the Chinese feel about Apple Inc.'s latest iPhones, the technology giant may have a huge struggle on its hands winning consumers over in the world's biggest smartphone market. One day after the Cupertino, Calif., company unveiled two new iPhone models - the 5s, with an upgraded processor and fingerprint security system, and the slightly cheaper 5c, with a colorful plastic back - 30-year-old Zhou, an employee at a state-owned enterprise, bought herself a Samsung Galaxy S4 instead.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Coastal flooding could cost big cities more than $60 billion a year by mid-century, with losses jumping even more dramatically if nothing is done to counter rising sea levels and subsiding land, a new study has found. A team of researchers analyzed data on flood exposure in 136 of the world's largest coastal cities to project steep increases in economic losses, from an estimated $6 billion a year in 2005 to $52 billion by 2050 based on changes in population, economic growth and urbanization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority agreed Tuesday to rebuild El Sombrero nightclub on Lankershim Boulevard without admitting that its subway tunneling caused its floor to sink up to 15 inches. Club owner Isabel Lopez said she was delighted to learn from Charles Stark, the MTA's Red Line project manager, of the offer. But she said she remains skeptical and anxious. "There's no documents, it's all word of mouth so far," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1988 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
Vicki Baker says she is getting a little tired of the cow humor. No more cute bovine-themed cookie jars or milk containers, she declares. No more one-liners about cow pies in the hallway. This is serious business. A ground sinkage problem is cracking foundations, strangely indenting lawns and putting pronounced dips in sidewalks in her modest housing tract in Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2013 | By Christopher Goffard
A 38-year-old Aliso Viejo woman is charged with setting fires in her taxpayer-subsidized residences, fraudulently collecting the insurance money, and cheating on welfare. Authorities said that in August 2009, Andrea Michelle Robinson set a fire in a bedroom of the Rancho Santa Margarita home where she was living while her 12-year-old daughter was asleep in another room, and collected $25,000 in insurance for the damage. In 2011 and 2012, authorities said, she set fires at her residences in Aliso Viejo and Laguna Niguel.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
The movie "42" arrived in theaters this spring swaddled snugly in the American flag. Studio marketers declared the film to be "the true story of an American legend. " With good reason: It's hard to find a more uplifting sports story than Jackie Robinson's battle against racism on his way to becoming one of the greatest ballplayers in history. "42" evoked its bygone era by filming extensively in Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee. The filmmakers collected millions in subsidies from those states' taxpayers, who proudly followed the production via local newspaper stories detailing its step-by-step progress from location to location.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|