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Subsidized Housing Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1996 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When it rained, a 2-foot-wide hole in the ceiling of Jose Luis Magana's modest studio apartment allowed water to pour in, soaking his kitchen. The sink in the same room backed up into the bathtub, which resulted in a deposit of brackish liquid so noxious that Magana, his wife and two sons were forced to use a neighbor's bathroom. But Magana and more than 25 other families living in the Grand Central Building received a lucky break, thanks to city plans to move them out.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Orange County residents rushed to apply for federal Section 8 housing assistance Friday, as county officials began opening the program's waiting list for the first time in two years. Applicants lined up at municipal buildings and libraries long before they opened, in hopes that being early would increase the chance of getting a voucher in a county where affordable housing is so scarce. "We had a guy here at 4:30 a.m.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST
A county group attempting to establish housing for low-income residents who have tested positive for the AIDS virus submitted an application Tuesday for federal funds for the project. The grant request seeks about $3 million that would be used to provide one-bedroom apartments to be rented, probably for less than $300 a month, said Reed Flory, a financial and development consultant for Affordable Housing Project of Orange County.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2000 | DIANE WEDNER and JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Low-income residents of Orange County, San Diego and dozens of other U.S. communities will receive higher federal housing subsidies to help keep pace with skyrocketing housing costs, the federal government's housing agency said Tuesday. Officials at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development said they hope the measure will make an additional 1.4 million apartments available to low-income families in areas where fast-rising prices are shutting them out of the rental market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1990 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
A program to help low- to moderate-income families buy houses is being considered by the City Council. If approved, the program would provide low-interest second mortgages to families whose incomes fall below a certain level. In January, developer George Taunton agreed to set aside six units in the Laurel Creek project for low- to moderate-income families. The development is located in Brea's historic downtown, near Brea Mall, and is expected to be completed in the fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1991 | TOM McQUEENEY
The City Council tonight will consider a ballot measure that would allow voters to advise whether the city's far-reaching affordable housing goals are appropriate. In February, City Councilman Bill Vardoulis said he thought that if residents understood that the city's goals encourage developers to build government-subsidized, low-income apartments rather than lower-priced houses, they would reject the goals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY
The City Council moved ahead this week with plans for a single-family housing project in the downtown redevelopment area. By unanimous vote, council members authorized the city to open negotiations with the Olson Co. to buy property owned by the Brea Redevelopment Agency. The 2.6-acre site is at the southeast corner of Birch Street and Poplar Avenue, next to the $7-million Brea Community Center, now under construction. The Olson Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1990 | LYNDA NATALI
City officials were baffled this week when only six people applied for the cut-rate home loans offered to help low- and moderate-income families purchase homes. "I was shocked," said Claire Chacon, the city's home improvement coordinator. "We were practically giving away $30,000." More than 100 applications had been distributed since the First Time Homebuyers program was approved by the City Council in February.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1990
The City Council has approved the development of a 122-unit senior citizen apartment complex that had been delayed for months after neighbors objected to increased traffic and noise from the project. The complex, to be located on a 2.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by a shrinking number of subsidized units for poor families, the nation's major housing agency said it will boost subsidies in an effort to preserve thousands of low-income rental units throughout Orange County and Southern California. The Department of Housing and Urban Development said it hopes the higher subsidies will curb the growing number of property owners who are pulling out of the subsidy program in favor of the higher rents of the open market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1999 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in almost four years, the Orange County Housing Authority will accept applications for a federal program providing $45 million in subsidized rents to low-income families. Advocates for the poor said the new program offers a rare opportunity for thousands of families, but stressed that it won't make much of a dent in the county's affordable housing shortage. Rents have climbed to an all-time high in Orange County, averaging more than $1,000 a month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1999 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in almost four years, the Orange County Housing Authority will accept applications for a federal program providing about $43 million annually in subsidized rents to low-income families squeezed by the hot real estate market. Advocates for the poor said the program offers a rare opportunity for thousands of needy families but stressed that it won't make much of a dent in the county's shortage of low-income housing.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by a shrinking number of subsidized units for poor families, the nation's major housing agency said it will boost subsidies in an effort to preserve thousands of low-income rental units throughout Orange County and Southern California. The Department of Housing and Urban Development said it hopes the higher subsidies will curb the growing number of property owners who are pulling out of the subsidy program in favor of the higher rents of the open market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1996 | JOYCE KELLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At 71, Jean Sandhorst had expected the complexities of life to be well behind her by now as she and her 72-year-old husband, Don, settled into retirement. Instead, the San Jacinto couple is consumed with caring for their son, John, who suffered a severe brain injury in a car accident 20 years ago. John is 36, and the accident left him beset with behavioral problems. His ability to reason is hampered by the injury, and he's been in various hospitals and programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1996 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When it rained, a 2-foot-wide hole in the ceiling of Jose Luis Magana's modest studio apartment allowed water to pour in, soaking his kitchen. The sink in the same room backed up into the bathtub, which resulted in a deposit of brackish liquid so noxious that Magana, his wife and two sons were forced to use a neighbor's bathroom. But Magana and more than 25 other families living in the Grand Central Building received a lucky break, thanks to city plans to move them out.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A government-sponsored banking institution on Monday awarded more than $700,000 in subsidies to six affordable-housing projects in Orange County--the largest single infusion to date for local low-income projects. The funds from the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco will help community organizations and savings and loans finance construction of 147 rental units and three detached homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1992 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Developers of a coastal resort must pay rent subsidies or provide other housing assistance to low-income workers or build their hotel elsewhere, the City Council ordered this week. In what city officials called a "precedent-setting" move, the council voted 3 to 2 Monday night to require the developer of the proposed Monarch Beach Resort to provide rent stipends to one-fourth of what are predicted to be its 580 full-time employees. The developer, Japan-based Nippon-Shinpan Co. Ltd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1995
Tenants moving into the city-owned Emerald Cove senior housing complex will pay rents up to $88 a month more than current residents starting Oct. 1. New tenants will pay $385 for a one-bedroom and $335 for a studio apartment under a schedule approved Monday by the City Council. Current tenants pay $337 for a one-bedroom downstairs apartment and $297 for upstairs. A downstairs studio currently rents for $285, $254 for upstairs.
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