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Subsidized Housing United States

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BUSINESS
September 12, 2000 | Times staff and wire reports
Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew Cuomo is expected to announce today a federal housing subsidy hike for low-income renters in the nation's highest-priced rental markets. It was not immediately clear whether Southern California would be included in the subsidy increase. Reuters news agency, citing a report by congressional sources, said the measure would raise the value of HUD's "Section 8" housing vouchers in areas where rents are skyrocketing.
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BUSINESS
September 13, 2000 | DIANE WEDNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Low-income residents of Orange County, San Diego and dozens of other U.S. communities will receive higher federal housing subsidies to help keep pace with skyrocketing housing costs, the Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Tuesday. Los Angeles County, whose high-rent areas already have benefited from higher rent subsidies, was not included in the first round of cities receiving additional federal assistance but may still qualify based on a second set of criteria.
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NEWS
June 6, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top officials of the Clinton administration announced an initiative Thursday to crack down on crime and drug use in the nation's public housing projects. Addressing several hundred police, prosecutors and public housing residents at the White House, Vice President Al Gore said $250 million would be provided to help residents in 13 target cities combat "the scourge of crime and drugs" in their housing complexes.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2000 | Times staff and wire reports
Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew Cuomo is expected to announce today a federal housing subsidy hike for low-income renters in the nation's highest-priced rental markets. It was not immediately clear whether Southern California would be included in the subsidy increase. Reuters news agency, citing a report by congressional sources, said the measure would raise the value of HUD's "Section 8" housing vouchers in areas where rents are skyrocketing.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bid to help revive inner-city neighborhoods, the Clinton administration is preparing to ask Congress to approve an experimental program to encourage construction of suburban-style subdivisions in the nation's distressed downtowns. The initiative would make $200 million in federal funds available nationwide for communities to create middle-class enclaves in abandoned downtown neighborhoods. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry G.
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House approved landmark legislation Thursday to overhaul Depression-era laws governing federal housing programs for the poor by shifting a large measure of authority from Washington to local communities. The bill, approved, 315 to 107, would replace an array of federal housing programs with two lump-sum block grants to the 3,400 local housing agencies across the country. Ninety-one Democrats voted for the bill.
NEWS
September 28, 1995 | MARC LACEY and TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although they lost a key vote Wednesday in the U.S. Senate on a program that provides federal rental subsidies to low-income tenants, housing advocates say their fight to keep the program alive continues. Senate Republicans had attempted to overhaul the housing program in the 1996 budget, but when their reform proposal proved too costly, they decided not to dole out any money for the program next year. To save money, they would begin funding the program again in October, 1997.
NEWS
July 23, 1994 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting with rare bipartisan accord, the House overwhelmingly approved a $65-billion housing bill Friday that would authorize new efforts to revitalize embattled public housing programs, including innovative methods to deal with crime.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government unveiled regulations to diversify public housing Thursday, with initiatives to make housing projects more palatable to the working poor and new powers to punish local housing authorities that fail to break up dense concentrations of poverty. The Department of Housing and Urban Development's new rules are aimed at both achieving racial integration in the nation's housing projects and bringing higher-income poor families into proximity with the most destitute.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate Banking Committee unanimously approved a sweeping overhaul of the nation's public housing system. The bill is similar to a bill currently under consideration by the House. Both bills are aimed at giving more power to local housing authorities and allowing them to accept more of the "working poor," people who have jobs but still live at or near the poverty line.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government unveiled regulations to diversify public housing Thursday, with initiatives to make housing projects more palatable to the working poor and new powers to punish local housing authorities that fail to break up dense concentrations of poverty. The Department of Housing and Urban Development's new rules are aimed at both achieving racial integration in the nation's housing projects and bringing higher-income poor families into proximity with the most destitute.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top officials of the Clinton administration announced an initiative Thursday to crack down on crime and drug use in the nation's public housing projects. Addressing several hundred police, prosecutors and public housing residents at the White House, Vice President Al Gore said $250 million would be provided to help residents in 13 target cities combat "the scourge of crime and drugs" in their housing complexes.
NEWS
May 27, 1997 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Thousands of public housing projects across the country--21 of them in Los Angeles alone--stand as ugly monuments to the Depression era. Many of them are dilapidated and infested with rats, roaches and crime; and most of the projects nationwide are densely populated with unemployed residents who are reluctant to find work, lest their rent payments increase. Not having a job guarantees a lower rent under current federal rules.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate Banking Committee unanimously approved a sweeping overhaul of the nation's public housing system. The bill is similar to a bill currently under consideration by the House. Both bills are aimed at giving more power to local housing authorities and allowing them to accept more of the "working poor," people who have jobs but still live at or near the poverty line.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, continuing its drive to remake public housing, awarded $716 million Tuesday to help 36 cities tear down decaying and dangerous public housing projects and enable other cities to relocate more than 15,000 tenants to private housing. The program, which includes projects in Los Angeles and San Francisco, marks another major step in dismantling the government's traditional program for housing the poor.
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House approved landmark legislation Thursday to overhaul Depression-era laws governing federal housing programs for the poor by shifting a large measure of authority from Washington to local communities. The bill, approved, 315 to 107, would replace an array of federal housing programs with two lump-sum block grants to the 3,400 local housing agencies across the country. Ninety-one Democrats voted for the bill.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, continuing its drive to remake public housing, awarded $716 million Tuesday to help 36 cities tear down decaying and dangerous public housing projects and enable other cities to relocate more than 15,000 tenants to private housing. The program, which includes projects in Los Angeles and San Francisco, marks another major step in dismantling the government's traditional program for housing the poor.
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Clinton Administration proposed converting public housing projects into "learning campuses" where tenants would take courses or participate in job training as a condition of living there. The idea is to replicate a college environment of living in dormitories while pursuing a degree, Housing Secretary Henry Cisneros said Tuesday. Unlike college, classes would be offered to all residents, from toddlers to the elderly, through day care or life-enrichment programs.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | From Associated Press
President Clinton ordered eviction Thursday for anyone committing a violent or drug-related crime in public housing, declaring a "one strike and you're out" rule is needed to make such housing safe. The president signed a directive ordering Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry G. Cisneros to issue national guidelines for housing authorities to incorporate the policy through tenant screening and lease agreements.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bid to help revive inner-city neighborhoods, the Clinton administration is preparing to ask Congress to approve an experimental program to encourage construction of suburban-style subdivisions in the nation's distressed downtowns. The initiative would make $200 million in federal funds available nationwide for communities to create middle-class enclaves in abandoned downtown neighborhoods. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry G.
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