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OPINION
January 6, 2010
Getting to the heart Re "Limbaugh says he's in good health," Jan. 2 Rush Limbaugh was released from the hospital after his (undiagnosed) chest pains were found to be unrelated to heart disease. He proclaimed: "I don't think there's one thing wrong with the United States health system." If Limbaugh lost his job (and his health insurance), could this overweight 58-year-old with a history of back problems, drug addiction and now undiagnosed chest pains even buy health insurance?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 28, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
SANFORD, Fla. - For many Americans, George Zimmerman has become the face of barbarous vigilante justice. For Olivia Bertalan, he was the face of compassion: a neighbor of consummate graciousness and low-key gallantry. About six months before Zimmerman shot and killed an unarmed black teenager in his town house complex, he was standing in Bertalan's doorway, asking what he could do to help her. A group of young men had just broken into Bertalan's town house as she and her infant cowered in a locked bedroom.
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NEWS
February 13, 1991 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 4 a.m. and the caravan is already leaving Moreno Valley in Riverside County for the long, long drive to work. Six men in a van pool have learned to sleep sitting up. One woman puts in a cassette tape and practices self-hypnosis. They thank God that when the sun comes up it will not be in their eyes. These are people who spend an average of three hours a day on the road while their children spend as much as 12 hours in day care. The drive home is usually worse than the drive in.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2010 | By Erika Schickel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Anna Quindlen is a good caretaker. In her new novel, "Every Last One," she welcomes us into her fictional world with open arms. She is accomplished, sure-handed and sensitive to her reader's needs — even a bit compulsive in her urge to make sure no nuance gets overlooked. Quindlen conjures family life from a palette of finely observed details: the sound of the scraping of forks on Melmac plates, an angry teenager's footfalls. "The sound Ruby's feet make on the stairs is the window of her soul," she writes.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | LESLIE DREYFOUS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Curatolas owned a fixer-upper with a romantic veranda. They had a jeep-style wagon and the requisite two kids, summer barbecues with friends and chirping crickets to serenade them at night. It was a suburban dream, and the New York couple hated it. "We had all these ideals about what we wanted in a home," Gerry Curatola said. "Rolling hills and country roads, lots of acreage. It was very romantic . . . but it wasn't reality. The suburbs weren't home."
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | BARBARA BRONSON GRAY, Gray is a regular contributor to Valley View.
Karen Gonzalez won't let her children ride their bicycles one block from their house to the local mini-market in Van Nuys. Marian Taylor is filled with fear as she listens to the police helicopters fly over her Sherman Oaks house. "They're shining a light in your area, and you know someone's hiding behind a bush," she says. Sally Whitehead, who has moved from the northeast Valley to the West Valley, sees the urban blight "moving across the Valley like a wave." She finds the traffic and the crime most stressful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1998
"The Evolution of U.S. Cities Into Child-Free Playgrounds" (Opinion, Dec. 13) is yet another nostalgia-ridden attack on postmodern urban space. Joel Kotkin laments that, due to the decline of families in major cities, "urban life will continue to evolve in its postmodern form, but without the common touch of humanity that only the sight and sound of children can bring." Apparently singles, gays, childless couples and the homeless or, as Kotkin refers to us, those "more tolerant of deviancy," do not fit into his view of humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1990
The first play I saw at the Grove Shakespeare Festival was "Julius Caesar" several years ago. I must admit I didn't know quite what to expect. I had some vague premonition that there would be a confusing array of characters running around, dressed in outdated costumes, mumbling unintelligible lines. How wrong I was! The play made what had always been a confusing period of history much clearer, the costumes added a real sense of the times, and the lines awoke me to the beauty of Shakespeare's poetry.
BOOKS
June 26, 2005 | Laurel Maury, Laurel Maury is an occasional contributor to Book Review and an editorial assistant for the New Yorker.
An exercise in perception asks a person to add one plus one plus one on paper, until reaching 100. The point is to notice how each "one" feels different. It's an apt way of looking at suburbia, with all the similar houses, all the similarly dressed people -- the same, yet different. "Ice Haven," a new graphic novel by "Ghost World" author Daniel Clowes, exploits this mass of sameness. Clowes often draws the same image several times in a row, but, fine artist that he is, doesn't merely copy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2010 | By Erika Schickel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Anna Quindlen is a good caretaker. In her new novel, "Every Last One," she welcomes us into her fictional world with open arms. She is accomplished, sure-handed and sensitive to her reader's needs — even a bit compulsive in her urge to make sure no nuance gets overlooked. Quindlen conjures family life from a palette of finely observed details: the sound of the scraping of forks on Melmac plates, an angry teenager's footfalls. "The sound Ruby's feet make on the stairs is the window of her soul," she writes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Sam Adams
Nicholas Ray's "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955) laid down the template for teenage rebellion in the 1950s, but the rebel in Ray's "Bigger Than Life," released the following year and out on DVD and Blu-ray from the Criterion Collection this week, is in a distinctly less romantic vein. James Mason is the picture of small-town rectitude, a soft-hearted teacher with a modest house, wife and child, until a life-threatening illness puts him on regular doses of the recently discovered "miracle drug" cortisone.
OPINION
January 6, 2010
Getting to the heart Re "Limbaugh says he's in good health," Jan. 2 Rush Limbaugh was released from the hospital after his (undiagnosed) chest pains were found to be unrelated to heart disease. He proclaimed: "I don't think there's one thing wrong with the United States health system." If Limbaugh lost his job (and his health insurance), could this overweight 58-year-old with a history of back problems, drug addiction and now undiagnosed chest pains even buy health insurance?
REAL ESTATE
February 3, 2008 | Diane Wedner, Times Staff Writer
Is it real, or is it a Hollywood set? With Spaulding Square, in the heart of Hollywood, it's hard to tell. The neighborhood, stocked with mint-condition period revival homes and pristine Craftsman bungalows, reflects the creative influence of the burgeoning movie industry, whose actors and technicians were among the first to buy houses here.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
IN the autumn of 1943, World War II raged. On Nov. 22, the cover of Life magazine featured a portrait of a GI, with the caption, "Foot Soldier." Here at home, however, the dreamers were busy planning for the boom that would come with peace. In the future they envisioned, you wouldn't need your feet to get around. There was a brand-new word for mobility. The word was "freeway." Of course, back then editors felt the need to explain the concept for those who might not understand it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2006 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
Humans aren't the only species undergoing rapid population growth in California; bears are proliferating too, especially near towns and urban centers tucked tightly against hills and mountain ranges. When the weather warms, the big, hairy interlopers have been known to swipe pies from windowsills in Lake Tahoe, dumpster dive in Mammoth and Jacuzzi dip in Monrovia. Black bears have even shown up recently in such unexpected places as Riverside, Salinas, Santa Cruz and San Diego.
BOOKS
June 26, 2005 | Laurel Maury, Laurel Maury is an occasional contributor to Book Review and an editorial assistant for the New Yorker.
An exercise in perception asks a person to add one plus one plus one on paper, until reaching 100. The point is to notice how each "one" feels different. It's an apt way of looking at suburbia, with all the similar houses, all the similarly dressed people -- the same, yet different. "Ice Haven," a new graphic novel by "Ghost World" author Daniel Clowes, exploits this mass of sameness. Clowes often draws the same image several times in a row, but, fine artist that he is, doesn't merely copy.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
SANFORD, Fla. - For many Americans, George Zimmerman has become the face of barbarous vigilante justice. For Olivia Bertalan, he was the face of compassion: a neighbor of consummate graciousness and low-key gallantry. About six months before Zimmerman shot and killed an unarmed black teenager in his town house complex, he was standing in Bertalan's doorway, asking what he could do to help her. A group of young men had just broken into Bertalan's town house as she and her infant cowered in a locked bedroom.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2002 | LISA GETTER, VICKI KEMPER and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five people were shot to death Wednesday and Thursday in a series of seemingly random attacks that shocked the middle-class suburbs of Washington, sending police swarming onto streets and highways in a frantic search for a small white cargo truck carrying two suspects. The shootings occurred within a 16-hour period that started Wednesday night and continued into the morning rush hour Thursday, spreading alarm through an enclave of bustling shopping centers and quiet neighborhoods of Montgomery County, Md., about 10 miles north of the White House.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Jean Kerr, the witty author, playwright and columnist who translated her Broadway-oriented suburban family life into the best-seller "Please Don't Eat the Daisies," which was spun off into a successful movie and television series, has died. She was 79. Kerr, the widow and collaborator of drama critic, playwright and director Walter Kerr, died Sunday in a White Plains, N.Y., hospital, apparently of pneumonia. She had lived in nearby Larchmont in what she called her "gingerbread dream house."
NATIONAL
October 4, 2002 | LISA GETTER, VICKI KEMPER and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five people were shot to death Wednesday and Thursday in a series of seemingly random attacks that shocked the middle-class suburbs of Washington, sending police swarming onto streets and highways in a frantic search for a small white cargo truck carrying two suspects. The shootings occurred within a 16-hour period that started Wednesday night and continued into the morning rush hour Thursday, spreading alarm through an enclave of bustling shopping centers and quiet neighborhoods of Montgomery County, Md., about 10 miles north of the White House.
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