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Suburbia

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
Oh, postwar American dream, what have you wrought? Isn't it enough to have coated one nation in an endless spew of soulless, cookie cutter homes? At Kopeikin Gallery, Alejandro Cartagena's crisp photographs of new suburban developments in northern Mexico attest that clearly, it is not. On the one hand, his images of tight, economical rows of cubes attest to the steadfast appeal of the dream - who doesn't want a little corner of the earth to call their own? On the other, they highlight the extent to which industrial society has preyed on that simple desire, distorting it into something cold and nightmarish.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Matt Cooper
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of April 27 - May 3, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies SERIES True Life "The Benjamins" are brothers, both diagnosed with autism but making a bid for greater self reliance, in this special episode of the docu-series. 7 p.m. MTV My Cat From Hell The unscripted series about ferocious felines and the owners who've come to fear them returns with new episodes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1989
Nowhere in Tom Pettepiece's first-person account on being homeless ("Homeless in Suburbia: A Few Bad Turns, and You're Sleeping in Your Pickup," Editorial Page, May 13) does he make mention of looking for work, any kind of work in order to survive. Surely with "10 years of higher education," he didn't need help in filling out a job application form and he was capable of doing more than sponging off his friends and whining. A trip to the local Employment Development Department office might have solved all of his problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Jon McNaught's “Dockwood” (Nobrow Press: unpaged, $19.95) is one of those books you could easily overlook. Gathering two short stories in comics form, it came out in England a year ago, but although McNaught won the Prix Révélation (for best newcomer) at the 2013 Angouleme International Comics Festival - an award previously won by Daniel Clowes , Art Spiegelman and Will Eisner - he's gotten no attention in the United States. Partly, that has to do with the British comics scene, which has had its issues crossing over, and partly with McNaught's publisher, which until recently was not particularly active here.
NEWS
November 28, 1985
Suburbia had a new kind of politics, according to Theodore White, and only word-of-mouth to explain it. Most suburban communities knew little or nothing about how they were governed. Most suburbs cannot support good newspapers or sustain local television stations subjecting local government to daily scrutiny. Suburbia has thus replaced the big city as the heartland of petty corruption. Suburban politics revolve around land--the homeowners' use of land; where new expressways will go; where new factories will go; zoning ordinances and land-use variances that politicians broker among themselves for money.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2006 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
ON a bucolic street in this suburb (what else?) south of San Francisco, Bill Owens lives in a cottage crammed with art, mementos and the detritus of enough half-started projects -- vintage pickup truck rebuilding, sparkling winemaking -- to full several lifetimes. Somehow the human skull sitting atop a shelf doesn't look out of place. "Don't ask me where I got it," says Owens. "I used to have an antique store. I can tell you where I got the cannonball, though."
NEWS
July 6, 1986 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
Suburbia. The very word conjures up images of sprawling, ranch-style homes with backyard barbecues, safe and stable neighborhoods with tree-lined streets, and traditional nuclear families with dad commuting to work and mom staying home with the kids. During their heyday in the 1950s and '60s, the suburbs were part of the middle-class American dream--an idyllic alternative to the cities and the urban ills that plagued them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Jon McNaught's “Dockwood” (Nobrow Press: unpaged, $19.95) is one of those books you could easily overlook. Gathering two short stories in comics form, it came out in England a year ago, but although McNaught won the Prix Révélation (for best newcomer) at the 2013 Angouleme International Comics Festival - an award previously won by Daniel Clowes , Art Spiegelman and Will Eisner - he's gotten no attention in the United States. Partly, that has to do with the British comics scene, which has had its issues crossing over, and partly with McNaught's publisher, which until recently was not particularly active here.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1999 | ROBIN RAUZI
For decades, Los Angeles has been derided as 40 (or 60 or 80 . . . ) suburbs in search of a city. Though few can deny that the nation's second-largest city is decidedly urban, there is something about the sprawl here that makes that insult sting. Perhaps it is because Los Angeles grew up differently from most other cities. First trains, then freeways, connected far-flung little towns. The next 70 years would fill in all the gaps.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu
Juggling glasses of white wine and baggies filled with baubles, dozens of women descended on a well-appointed Orange County home this week to trade in their old golden treasures for hefty checks. There were earrings from ex-boyfriends, ring settings with missing stones and chain bracelets from sorority sisters. One woman brought in her husband's wedding ring -- from a previous marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
Oh, postwar American dream, what have you wrought? Isn't it enough to have coated one nation in an endless spew of soulless, cookie cutter homes? At Kopeikin Gallery, Alejandro Cartagena's crisp photographs of new suburban developments in northern Mexico attest that clearly, it is not. On the one hand, his images of tight, economical rows of cubes attest to the steadfast appeal of the dream - who doesn't want a little corner of the earth to call their own? On the other, they highlight the extent to which industrial society has preyed on that simple desire, distorting it into something cold and nightmarish.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
First published on April 24, 2011. Revised and expanded in early 2012. The San Fernando Valley is 260 square miles of suburbia. Actually, make that suburbia on nutritional supplements. And antidepressants. With perhaps a little cosmetic surgery south of Ventura Boulevard, where the big money is. Or maybe -- now that it's grown to more than 1.7 million people in nearly three dozen cities and neighborhoods rich and poor - the Valley isn't even a suburb anymore. It begins just 10 miles northwest of Los Angeles City Hall, sprawling west to the Simi Hills, north to the Santa Susana Mountains and east to the Verdugo and San Gabriel mountains.
SPORTS
October 5, 2011 | Eric Sondheimer
Normal, quiet life in suburbia is going to come to a screeching halt in Westlake Village on Thursday night as all eyes focus on the Marmonte League football showdown between Oaks Christian (3-1, 3-0) and host Westlake (4-0, 3-0). If the matchup is anywhere close to what happened the last time these two neighborhood rivals played, Westlake Coach Jim Benkert will get a few more gray hairs and Oaks Christian Coach Bill Redell will get even balder. Oaks Christian defeated Westlake, 29-28, in the Northern Division championship game when a 41-yard field-goal try by Alex Ball hit the right goal post with one second left.
IMAGE
June 12, 2011 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
When Giorgio Beverly Hills was in its heyday, from the late 1960s to the late 1980s, Rodeo Drive was not lined with the kind of marquee designer flagships that are located there today. There was no Prada Epicenter, with its arty open facade, or faux Italianate Via Rodeo shopping complex (that was a parking lot). And there certainly was nothing like today's Bebe and Guess stores, which would seem better suited to a suburban shopping mall than a billionaire's boulevard. Back then, Rodeo Drive was a destination for locally owned independent boutiques, both hip and luxe, including Theodore, where retailer Herb Fink sold the Brigitte Bardot-St.
TRAVEL
April 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The San Fernando Valley is 260 square miles of suburbia. Actually, make that suburbia on nutritional supplements. And antidepressants. With perhaps a little cosmetic surgery south of Ventura Boulevard, where the big money is. Or maybe - now that it's grown to more than 1.7 million people in nearly three dozen cities and neighborhoods rich and poor - the Valley isn't even a suburb anymore. It begins just 10 miles northwest of Los Angeles City Hall, sprawling west to the Simi Hills, north to the Santa Susana Mountains, and east to the Verdugo and San Gabriel mountains.
FOOD
July 8, 2010 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
One of the hardest parts of Jim Pastor's job is convincing people that he exists: He's a milkman. "The reaction is always the same," Pastor said. "People say, 'Really? A milkman? Like in the old days?' They always have a hard time believing it." Pastor owns a Santa Ana-based delivery service that contracts with Rockview Farms, one of the largest family-owned dairies in Southern California. Each week, Pastor and his team of 14 milkmen drive their refrigerated trucks to more than 4,800 homes along routes in Los Angeles and Orange counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1987
As a white student and relative newcomer to Monterey Park, I find Chinese culture interesting and Chinese girls beautiful. I love living here and have no intention of leaving. JIM BYER Monterey Park
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2010 | By Tony Barboza
A Fullerton man's annual ritual -- planting 3,200 tulip bulbs in his frontyard -- comes on full display every spring, when petals of light peach and deep crimson bloom into a colorful neighborhood curiosity. Wayne Daniels, 73, is known simply as the Tulip Man, a mild-mannered retired high school science teacher who looks forward to the annual influx of sightseers, visiting couples and tour buses carrying onlookers from retirement homes. Each spring they arrive to gaze upon the shaded garden in front of the ranch-style home where Daniels lives by himself -- an explosion of color on a quiet suburban street of tidy, simple yards.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2009 | Michael Ordona
"Lymelife" resides in a suburban netherworld with "American Beauty," "The Ice Storm" and "Snow Angels," where the American Dream staggers out of bed every morning to coffee and ennui. But in this case, there are some laughs as well, as this keenly observed film wrenches gallows humor out of a crumbling family. And, like the Lyme disease-carrying ticks haunting the woods around the neighborhood, it's a movie that gets under the skin.
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