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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2013 | Emily Alpert
Bucking longstanding patterns in the United States, more poor people now live in the nation's suburbs than in urban areas, according to a new analysis. As poverty mounted throughout the nation over the past decade, the number of poor people living in suburbs surged 67% between 2000 and 2011 -- a much bigger jump than in cities, researchers for the Brookings Institution said in a book published today. Suburbs still have a smaller percentage of their population living in poverty than cities do, but the sheer number of poor people scattered in the suburbs has jumped beyond that of cities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | Frank Shyong
Chen Si, 35, and her husband visited Los Angeles from Shanghai for the first time in December, excited about local attractions like Disneyland and Hollywood. They were less enthused about the idea of American food. They booked a room in San Gabriel, where friends said they could find "acceptable" Chinese food in the surrounding neighborhood, Si said. The once-quiet suburb about 12 miles east of downtown Los Angeles is in the midst of a transformation built on the growing international reputation of its Chinese food and services.
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NATIONAL
June 28, 2012 | By Don Lee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Since the advent of the automobile in the 1920s, America's suburbs have been growing faster than cities as people fled urban life for quieter, less-crowded expanses. But new Census Bureau data indicate that, in general, cities last year grew faster than suburbs, reflecting an urban renaissance accelerated by the Great Recession. For all 51 metro areas with a million or more people, cities as a whole grew by 1.1% from 2010 to 2011, while suburbs increased 0.9%.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2014 | By Matt Pearce and Tina Susman
NEW YORK - The death of Oscar-winning actor Philip Seymour Hoffman underscores a surge in heroin use reminiscent of the 1970s and early '80s. More than 660,000 Americans used heroin in 2012, health officials say - nearly double the number from five years earlier - and users tend to be more affluent than before, living in the suburbs and rural areas rather than the inner city. "It's reached epidemic proportions here in the United States," said Rusty Payne, a Washington, D.C.-based spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Administration.
WORLD
August 25, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
CAIRO - In one of the many videos from Wednesday's alleged chemical attack in Syria, a father holds the lifeless body of his daughter. On the ground at his feet lay the body of another daughter. "Before, I put out food for her and she said, 'Dad, today is not my turn for food, it's my siblings' turn,'" the man said, referring to bread and food shortages in their town caused by the government's siege. "And the hunger, what are we supposed to do?" The grief-stricken father was talking about the rebel-controlled Ghouta Sharqia area, suburbs east of Damascus, where a months-long siege has prevented food, medicine and other aid from reaching the towns outside the capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1999
A Times poll finds that most suburban residents give their public schools high marks for quality. They say their children are safe on campus. But some say drugs, alcohol and racial tension are problems at school. * Source: Los Angeles Times Poll
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
When Gov. Bill Clinton speaks in the San Gabriel Valley today, he'll encounter many of the tricky currents that will determine whether he carries California. Racially, the state has no greater ethnic mixing bowl, with Latinos, Anglos, blacks and Asians living in suburbs that extend from East Los Angeles to Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Economically, these suburbs mirror the state's troubles.
SPORTS
March 14, 1987
We couldn't believe our eyes as we read the Rich Tosches article of March 7, "Following the Yellow Brick Road." Is he auditioning for The Comedy Store or is he doing a bad imitation of Jim Murray? In either event, his humorous banter was ridiculous and certainly had nothing to do with why Westlake High School was playing in the Sports Arena. What does suburb bashing have to do with the fact that the Westlake team made it to the CIF 4-A final by using its skill, endurance and depth?
OPINION
December 2, 2006
Re "Where to hear 'Hi, neighbor!': in the suburbs," Nov. 27 The article on the UC Irvine survey about suburbs, which showed that they have more sociability than cities, should be a challenge to conventional New Urbanist thinking. But it would be nice if the study would also get the same data for small towns and farmsteads. Suburbia is in many ways the duplication of the farmstead life in an urban area. It does not, however, bear much resemblance in its culture to that of the small town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1989 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Suburban political power has stacked the deck against attempts by urban lawmakers to oppose Gov. George Deukmejian's budget proposals to limit and reduce medical aid and welfare benefits. A clear example of that is Los Angeles County, where the state's biggest collection of suburbs--most with conservative voting histories--ring an urban area, the city of Los Angeles, where large numbers of poor who are dependent on aid payments and public hospitals and clinics are concentrated.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - A closely watched ballot measure that would set the minimum wage at $15 an hour for certain workers in the small city of SeaTac was dealt another setback late Friday, when a superior court judge ruled that the proposition would not affect employees at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Proposition 1, which passed Nov. 5 with a 77-vote margin and survived a recount, would have given more than 6,000 workers at big hotels, airport concessions, airport parking lots and large rental car companies a 63% raise and granted them paid sick leave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | Phil Vettel
Jean Banchet, a prodigiously talented chef and gregarious personality who almost single-handedly raised Chicago's dining reputation from a steak-and-potatoes town to a serious restaurant city, has died. He was 72. Banchet, Chicago's first celebrity chef, died Sunday at his home in Jupiter, Fla., three weeks after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, said his wife, Doris. In 1973, Chicago's culinary reputation began and ended with steak. Then came Banchet, who had been brought to the area by famed restaurateur Arnie Morton to head the kitchen at the Playboy Club in Lake Geneva, Wis. When Banchet was ready to strike out on his own, he selected a property in Wheeling, Ill. - the closest place to Chicago that he could afford, nearly 30 miles away.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON--Houston Mayor Annise Parker staged what may seem like a political coup Tuesday, winning a third term in a red state during a year in which female candidates lost mayoral bids in Los Angeles and New York. To top it off, Parker, 57, is a Democrat - and openly gay. Parker won 57% of the vote election night compared with Republican challenger Ben Hall's 27%. That's after Hall, an African American former city attorney, spent millions on his campaign in an effort to win over conservative and African American voters dissatisfied with Parker.
WORLD
October 29, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
For many months, people in the Damascus suburb of Muadhamiya have arisen with uncertainty: the unknown of whether, or how much, they would eat. "You wake up in the morning and your only concern is to find something to eat," Qusai Zakarya, 27, a member of the town's opposition council, said by Skype. "Perhaps today we won't find food, or perhaps we will find a handful of vegetables and can make some salad. " Weighing hunger against the risk of shelling or sniper fire by Syrian government forces, some venture to the town's outer fields and orchards to forage for vegetables and herbs.
WORLD
August 25, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
CAIRO - In one of the many videos from Wednesday's alleged chemical attack in Syria, a father holds the lifeless body of his daughter. On the ground at his feet lay the body of another daughter. "Before, I put out food for her and she said, 'Dad, today is not my turn for food, it's my siblings' turn,'" the man said, referring to bread and food shortages in their town caused by the government's siege. "And the hunger, what are we supposed to do?" The grief-stricken father was talking about the rebel-controlled Ghouta Sharqia area, suburbs east of Damascus, where a months-long siege has prevented food, medicine and other aid from reaching the towns outside the capital.
WORLD
August 18, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim and Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO - The leader of Egypt's military declared Sunday that he would not tolerate further violence as his security forces moved to suppress any fresh street protests after bloody days that saw more than 800 people killed, many of them supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted President Mohamed Morsi. The Islamist movement that ruled Egypt for a year until it was toppled by the military last month faced a defining moment as hundreds more of its members were arrested, with the interim government freezing its financial assets and vilifying it as a terrorist organization.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The son of a chicken farmer, George Beardsley moved with his folks to the Mojave Desert outpost of Hesperia in 1948. The roads were dirt, the pace slow and the nearest city, San Bernardino, took two hours to reach. "There were 300 people here then," Beardsley recalled, "and I knew every one of them. Not only that, I knew their dogs and the names of their dogs too." Forty-two years have passed, and Beardsley is now the mayor.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sarah Lloyd is worried about her son. Sitting inside her car on a tree-shaded street on Monday, waiting to pick him up from the St. Mills Elementary School, her eyes widened with concern as she talked about 14-year-old Michael. The boy is in no trouble with the law or with his teachers. Hardly.
WORLD
August 13, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
JARAMANA, Syria - They were cleaning up the debris the other day at Alaa's falafel shop, its windows blown out and its interior in shambles after a car bomb detonated in Swords Square, the heart of this bustling Damascus suburb. "They came to Syria to do jihad," said one distraught resident, whose in-law was among 10 killed in the July 25 blast. "Pardon me, but why don't they go to Israel to do their jihad?" This teeming district, its population swelled by residents fleeing violence elsewhere in the country because of its relative sense of security, is now under attack.
WORLD
July 30, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
DAMASCUS, Syria - A chaotic passageway through blasted walls, blood-spattered floors and bullet-pocked rooms leads to the narrow stairway where a teenager pokes his Kalashnikov rifle into a sliver of light slicing through the sandbags. "If we don't protect our camp, who will?" asked 18-year-old Yehya from his perch on a landing, keeping watch on crumbling apartment blocks and debris-laden streets outside. The battle for Damascus, the capital, has become a brutal fight for the suburbs.
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