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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON and SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A subway worker fell 50 feet to his death in Universal City early Friday, raising new questions about job safety on Metro Rail's construction program, the region's biggest public works project. The 33-year-old carpenter worked for Tutor-Saliba-Perini, the same contractor fined for violating job safety laws after one of its laborers was crushed by a half-ton bucket in Hollywood earlier this year. The two deaths were the first in the $6.1-billion subway project's 10-year history.
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OPINION
April 3, 2012 | By Greg Goldin
It's hardly where you'd expect to find such news, but an environmental impact statement just issued by the L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority for the Purple Line subway contains an ominous report on the status of the arts in Los Angeles. According to the document, before the transportation agency begins digging tunnels through the tar-and-fossil-filled veins of San Pedro sand that lie beneath Wilshire Boulevard, it will aim an above-ground wrecker's ball at three of L.A.'s most vulnerable arts establishments, leveling the city's only architecture museum along with two other gallery spaces that are part of the city's Museum Row. In the name of a greater good - extending the subway down Wilshire Boulevard to Westwood and, someday, the ocean - the buildings that house the A+D architecture museum and the Edward Cella Art+Architecture and Steve Turner Contemporary galleries will all be razed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1995
I am outraged by the cries from certain public and civic representatives (an L.A. County supervisor, the head of the Van Nuys Homeowners Assn.) that the L.A. subway project be abandoned. That's truly the can-do American spirit: "We've run into some problems so let's forget it." (Not!) I can picture naysayers like these at other great, but difficult public works projects. At the building of the Central Valley and Los Angeles aqueducts: "We'll never get that water over the Grapevine."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
L.A. County officials approved a long-range transportation plan Thursday, reaffirming the Westside subway and a rail connection through downtown L.A. as top priorities for federal funding. The vote by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority board marks a victory for backers of the Westside subway, who are hoping to fast-track the project so that it is finished in as few as 10 years. But the plan also affirmed several other major rail and road projects, notably proposed lines in the San Gabriel Valley and South L.A. The document outlines how the agency will spend an estimated $300 billion over the next 30 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
The high-powered construction firm that built the Promenade Towers in downtown Los Angeles and the Tom Bradley Terminal at Los Angeles International Airport and that helped restore the San Francisco cable car system was the low bidder Wednesday for the largest single portion of the Metro Rail subway project. Tutor-Saliba Properties of Sylmar, which linked up with S. J. Groves & Sons Co. of Minneapolis, came in with a bid of $61.5 million--nearly $15 million less than the $76.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing evidence of "a series of abuses . . . that threatens the appropriate use of billions of taxpayer dollars," the chairman of a powerful U.S. Senate subcommittee announced Thursday that his panel will launch an investigation into the construction of Los Angeles' Metro Rail subway system. Sen. William V. Roth Jr. (R.-Del.
NEWS
March 27, 1995 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henry Lee survived the riots. He survived the earthquake. But he did not survive the MTA. Lee, whose key shop has had a red "Unsafe to Enter" sign posted on its door since last summer--when tunneling caused parts of Hollywood Boulevard to sink--is among the merchants and residents who have tried to cope with life in the Subway Construction Zone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1995 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The main insurer for the trouble-plagued Los Angeles subway is threatening to abandon its coverage unless transit officials agree to what could amount to a sharp increase in taxpayers' liability for the rail project. Prompted by expensive setbacks in the $5.8-billion subway project, Argonaut Insurance wants to double the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's deductible to $1 million per incident and impose other changes that would effectively broaden the agency's financial exposure.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | RICHARD SIMON and DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five weeks after taking the extraordinary step of withholding $1.6 billion for future subway work in Los Angeles, a Clinton Administration official Thursday reinstated the funding and said he expects improvements in construction quality and safety. Federal Transit Administrator Gordon J. Linton said local officials have adequately addressed his concerns by making a number of changes in the way that the multibillion-dollar subway project is to be managed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether you live in Long Beach or Palmdale, you should care about the Los Angeles subway project. You're paying for it. Every time you buy anything taxable in Los Angeles County, one cent of every dollar goes to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2009 | Steve Hymon
A subway extension to the Westside cleared a small hurdle Thursday when transit officials approved going ahead with an environmental impact study of the rail line. The board of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority approved a $17.2-million contract with the engineering firm Parsons-Brinckerhoff to complete the report, a necessary first step before construction. Officials doubt that ground will be broken before 2013. The line is expected to follow a route along Wilshire Boulevard before swinging south to Century City and then back north to Westwood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2009 | Steve Hymon
According to a timetable set by transportation officials overseeing Measure R, one of the most significant projects to speed travel on Los Angeles' Westside -- the "Subway to the Sea" -- is set to go very, very slowly. The proposed rail line doesn't figure to pass engineering and environmental muster until 2013, just in time to see its biggest booster, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, leave office if elected to a second term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2005 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's dream of building a subway to the ocean won't begin with digging. Instead, the work will kick off later this month at a downtown hotel, where a handful of engineers and transit experts will tackle a question that has long stymied Los Angeles' subway system: Is it possible to tunnel below Wilshire Boulevard without blowing anything up? That answer is the first bureaucratic hurdle to clear if Villaraigosa wants to fulfill his campaign promise.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | MATEA GOLD and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Construction giant Tutor-Saliba Corp. was ordered Wednesday to pay more than $29.5 million for assorted acts of business misconduct related to Los Angeles' long-troubled subway system, a damage award that could hamper the firm's ability to land future public works jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a train operator shouted, "All aboard!" federal, state and local officials packed into a Red Line train for an inaugural trip Friday to dedicate the last leg of the Metro Rail subway to the San Fernando Valley. The sleek silver and red train sped swiftly from North Hollywood to the Universal City station carrying a proud crowd of politicians and dignitaries. In a quintessential Los Angeles media event, they were greeted by a welcoming party of Universal Studio characters.
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles, a city defined by its love affair with the automobile, will pass a major mass transit milestone next weekend when the last leg of the $4.7-billion Metro Rail subway project opens to the San Fernando Valley. It has been a longer and more arduous journey than the rail line's length would suggest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1989 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the result of some behind-the-scenes efforts by Mayor Tom Bradley, the battle between the area's two biggest transit authorities for control of the $3.4-billion Metro Rail project appears headed for a compromise settlement late this week or next. The settlement, if accepted, would create an independent third agency to build Los Angeles County rail systems, transit officials said. At the mayor's request, the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission's transit committee on Monday put off discussion of a recommendation to cancel the Southern California Rapid Transit District's $19.7-million contract to design and engineer the second phase of the $3.4-billion Metro Rail project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2009 | Steve Hymon
According to a timetable set by transportation officials overseeing Measure R, one of the most significant projects to speed travel on Los Angeles' Westside -- the "Subway to the Sea" -- is set to go very, very slowly. The proposed rail line doesn't figure to pass engineering and environmental muster until 2013, just in time to see its biggest booster, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, leave office if elected to a second term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tim Shumaker has a sinking feeling that he's reached the end of the line with the new Los Angeles subway. That's because there seems to be no end to the nearly six years of misery that Hollywood's only blind talent agent has suffered since tunneling for the Red Line destroyed his business and left him homeless. Shumaker's world collapsed in 1994 when subway construction beneath Hollywood Boulevard caused the building where he lived and worked to abruptly drop 9 inches. Police gave Shumaker and his business partner-wife, Maggie, five minutes to grab what they could.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each time the city's subway diggers carve into the earth at Campo de Cahuenga near Universal City, the past has a funny way of poking back. On Thursday, archeologists hired by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority will dig into a parking lot to locate portions of a historic adobe's foundation. Historians believe the adobe is where an 1847 peace treaty was signed ending the Mexican-American War in California.
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