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Subway Series

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October 15, 1989 | SHIRLEY POVICH, WASHINGTON POST
At the first hint that two teams from the same neighborhood are verging on winning the two major-league pennants, the scream goes up and the sports pages react as if on command: "Subway Series!" Thus, some special significance, some historical importance is imputed to the upcoming World Series. It is not ours to reason why. Already there have occurred 15 of these intramural showdowns. So it has never been a rare event, or an endangered species to be cosseted and preserved.
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SPORTS
June 26, 2010 | By DeAntae Prince
New York Yankees second baseman Robinson Cano drove in 85 runs last season, a very respectable number. His current hitting streak has him on pace to surpass that total by year's end. Cano has a major-league-best .361 batting average and 50 RBI near the season's halfway mark, landing him in the top 10 in the American League. Cano, who has a .413 on-base percentage and 53 runs, said he has become more patient at the plate. Viewing more pitches also helped him to hit .400 in April and .357 in June, he said.
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SPORTS
October 15, 2000 | PAUL GUTIERREZ
There's a certain warm aroma that resides in this city's underground subway system. And while it's not the most pleasant of stimuli, the locals bear with it and would even enjoy the smell should a much-hyped Subway Series develop between the Mets and Yankees, which would clog the No. 7 and No. 4 trains here. For what it's worth, the Mets insist they're not looking ahead to the possibility of the first all-inclusive New York World Series since 1956, when the Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers.
SPORTS
June 29, 2002 | From Associated Press
The New York Mets won the home-run derby. Catcher Jorge Posada and the New York Yankees won the game. Posada connected from both sides of the plate to drive in five runs and Robin Ventura knocked in four against his former team as the Yankees defeated the Mets, 11-5, Friday night at Yankee Stadium. Yet for all the big hits, Orlando Hernandez provided the biggest lift for the Yankees.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY
"New York, New York" hasn't been a happy tune thus far for Fox, as the "subway" World Series between the Yankees and Mets has gotten off to a slow start compared with last year's box score, based on viewing estimates issued Tuesday by Nielsen Media Research. Viewing of the first two games Saturday and Sunday was down nearly 20% compared with a year ago, when the Yankees played the Atlanta Braves--still enough to lift Fox into third place for the week.
SPORTS
September 1, 1985 | THOMAS BOSWELL, The Washington Post
A detective story is a Who Done It. A pennant race is a Who'll Do It. One starts with a dead body. The other ends with one. In the thriller, the cause of death customarily is murder. In baseball, usually it's suicide. Clues and characters are scattered through the first 200 pages of Trent's Last Case so their accumulated richness can create suspense for the final 50.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON and OSCAR C. JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rocko Svihra was itching to end his shift. The Manhattan Beach mail carrier, who always wears a N.Y. Mets cap, yearned for the latest news about Yankees pitcher Roger Clemens' fine for throwing bat shards toward Mets catcher Mike Piazza two nights earlier. Besides, the former New Jersey resident had to change out of his postal uniform into blue shorts and an orange shirt before planting himself in front of the TV in his bedroom to watch Game 3 of the World Series on Tuesday night.
SPORTS
October 18, 2000 | ROSS NEWHAN
The Subway Series became a reality Tuesday night. The New York Yankees won the American League pennant and kept their Saturday date with the New York Mets by exploding for six runs in the seventh inning of a 9-7 victory over the Seattle Mariners, who are left with a far less appealing reality.
SPORTS
September 28, 1985
A lot has been written about the possibility of a subway series between the New York Mets and Yankees or a freeway series between the Dodgers and Angels. How about the possibility of an autobahn (Audubon) series between the Blue Jays and Cardinals? WIL MORAN Los Angeles
SPORTS
July 3, 1999
Being a Dodger fan used to mean looking forward to the postseason. Now, the Dodger postseason begins around mid-June. Problem is, these Dodgers don't seen to care. JOHN FRASER Aliso Viejo Whenever the last-place Dodgers meet the last-place Angels, it should be called the Subway Series because they're both in a hole and going nowhere fast. STAN KAPLAN Garden Grove
SPORTS
June 17, 2001 | STEVE JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
Once upon a time, there were the Yankees, who were kings of all of baseball and of New York, and had been for some time. And there were the Mets, and they weren't very good, but the rare occasions when they played each other were notable occasions. They called it the Mayor's Trophy Game. There was the wonderful rainy night in the long-lost Polo Grounds when the Mets had a catcher named Choo Choo Coleman, who could throw if he could stop the ball.
SPORTS
June 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
It was the Subway Series all over again: Luis Sojo got a key hit, and Mike Piazza was in the middle of a crazy play. More important, the Yankees ended up on top again Friday night at Shea Stadium, winning, 5-4, in their first matchup with the Mets since October. "We are sort of bit by the bizarre incident," said Piazza, who, as the potential tying run, was thrown out at home on a wild play in the eighth inning. "It's just the way the series has gone."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2000 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The World Series this year between the Yankees and the Mets again illustrates the difference between living on the East and West coasts: A lot. Game 1, which the Yankees won in the 12th inning, 4-3, ended after 1 a.m. (local time) Sunday morning. Game 2, also won by the Yankees, 6-5, flirted with midnight. The games started a little after 8 p.m. Games 3 and 4 were more of the same.
SPORTS
October 27, 2000 | MAL FLORENCE
New York newspapers are publishing advice from psychiatrists and psychologists on how to handle Subway Series stress. The experts advised overzealous fans to limit alcohol consumption, not be pressured by rowdy peers and to watch games at friendly bars where their team is the favorite. Parents rooting for opposing teams should flip coins to settle disputes over which team colors the children should wear. Hey, experts, get real.
SPORTS
October 26, 2000 | ROSS NEWHAN
The bat that Roger Clemens shattered in Game 2 of the World Series is taking on ominous symbolism for the New York Mets. This is a team swinging damaged wood as it struggles to stay alive against the New York Yankees, who won, 3-2, Wednesday night to take a 3-1 lead in the best-of-seven event. Now, of course, the Mets are down to their final token in the Subway Series, and their offense doesn't hold much currency. The Mets are hitting .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON and OSCAR C. JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rocko Svihra was itching to end his shift. The Manhattan Beach mail carrier, who always wears a N.Y. Mets cap, yearned for the latest news about Yankees pitcher Roger Clemens' fine for throwing bat shards toward Mets catcher Mike Piazza two nights earlier. Besides, the former New Jersey resident had to change out of his postal uniform into blue shorts and an orange shirt before planting himself in front of the TV in his bedroom to watch Game 3 of the World Series on Tuesday night.
SPORTS
October 18, 2000 | ROSS NEWHAN
Sitting in the New York Yankee dugout before Game 6 of the American League's championship series, the inimitable Don Zimmer spoke highly of Manager Joe Torre's performance this year. "Whether we do or don't make the World Series, I really believe this has been Joe's best year of managing," the bench coach said.
SPORTS
October 21, 2000 | MAL FLORENCE
Frank Fitzpatrick in the Philadelphia Inquirer: "Talk about a Subway Series: "On the morning of Oct. 1, 1952, Joe Black, the Brooklyn Dodgers' starting pitcher in that day's World Series opener, was clutching a strap on the D train while it rumbled toward Ebbets Field. " 'So I'm standing there,' Black recalled, 'waiting to get off at the Prospect Park stop, and this guy next to me says, "Hey, whaddya think of this guy Black we got pitching in Game 1?"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY
"New York, New York" hasn't been a happy tune thus far for Fox, as the "subway" World Series between the Yankees and Mets has gotten off to a slow start compared with last year's box score, based on viewing estimates issued Tuesday by Nielsen Media Research. Viewing of the first two games Saturday and Sunday was down nearly 20% compared with a year ago, when the Yankees played the Atlanta Braves--still enough to lift Fox into third place for the week.
SPORTS
October 21, 2000 | MAL FLORENCE
Frank Fitzpatrick in the Philadelphia Inquirer: "Talk about a Subway Series: "On the morning of Oct. 1, 1952, Joe Black, the Brooklyn Dodgers' starting pitcher in that day's World Series opener, was clutching a strap on the D train while it rumbled toward Ebbets Field. " 'So I'm standing there,' Black recalled, 'waiting to get off at the Prospect Park stop, and this guy next to me says, "Hey, whaddya think of this guy Black we got pitching in Game 1?"
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