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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2010
"How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" Where: Freud Playhouse, UCLA, Westwood When: 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7 p.m. Sundays. Ends May 23. Price: $20 to $75 Contact: (310) 825-2101 or http://www.reprise.org
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SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
The Dodgers didn't make any errors behind Zack Greinke in their 5-2 victory Wednesday over the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium. This was significant, considering how the Dodgers have played defense in the first three-plus weeks of the regular season. They have been one of the worst defensive teams in baseball. They entered the day with 22 errors, the second-most among the 30 teams in the majors. Their fielding percentage of .974 was third-worst. “We have to get better,” Hanley Ramirez said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By David Ng
The Broadway revival of "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" will end its run at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre in New York on May 20, organizers announced this week. The musical, which currently stars pop singer Nick Jonas, will have played 473 regular performances by the time it closes. "How to Succeed" has been a profitable production, recouping its initial $9-million investment in December, according to organizers. But the musical recently has seen its box-office fortunes decline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Jean Merl
Gang prosecutor Elan S. Carr, a Republican in the crowded race to succeed retiring Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Beverly Hills), on Monday became the first of the candidates to start airing campaign ads on cable TV. The 30-second spot, dubbed "Doing What's Right," introduces the first-time candidate by highlighting his experience as a Los Angeles County deputy district attorney who has "put hundreds of violent criminals behind bars. " "But we need to keep kids out of gangs in the first place," Carr says in the ad, "with more after-school programs, job training and better schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1986 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A special report on graduation '86, summer plans, this year's brightest high school grads, and those once voted most likely to succeed. Other stories begin on Page 10. They are selected unscientifically. They could simply be the best-liked high school seniors. Or the smartest, the most talented, athletic, hard-working, street-wise, or ambitious. For whatever reasons, their classmates voted them "Most Likely to Succeed."
NEWS
December 30, 2003
Here's how to coo through your hands. To succeed don't forget step 5: Try, try again.
SPORTS
October 31, 1998
The Dodgers will never succeed with egomaniac Davey Johnson, who said, "I think it was a brilliant choice." Fact is, he was third choice. JAMES R. GREGG Anaheim Hills
OPINION
June 17, 2002
Steve Lopez's June 12 column about young Aurelio Marquez, and his determination to succeed in his dreams of an education at an Ivy League university, was a magnificent piece of journalism. Our 12-year-old grandson has those same dreams to go to the University of Michigan. He and his 10-year-old sister have been attending a Catholic school, both to enrich their faith in family and because it offers an outstanding educational opportunity. Our prayers are that they will succeed as did young Aurelio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush has selected Lt. Gen. Ronald L. Watts to become the next inspector general of the Army, the Pentagon has announced. If confirmed by the Senate, Watts, 54, will succeed Lt. Gen. Henry Doctor Jr., who is retiring.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1989
Freddie Heineken, 65, has resigned as chairman of the international brewer bearing his name. Heineken, 65, was the last family member to run the Amsterdam-based company. Gerard van Schaik, 57, previously vice chairman, has been named to succeed Heineken. Heineken joined the company in 1942, at 19, and has played a key role in its expansion since then. He became a director in 1951 and chairman in 1971.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Jean Merl and Richard Simon
Campaign contributions are flowing briskly to candidates in some of California's hottest congressional races, including two of the most vocal proponents of getting money out of politics. Incumbents in races in the Sacramento area, Central Valley, Bay Area and Riverside and Ventura counties each have raised more than $1 million to fend off vigorous challengers. And in San Diego County, freshman Democratic Rep. Scott Peters and his main opponent, Republican Carl DeMaio, were nearly neck and neck, with Peters taking in nearly $1.8 million to DeMaio's almost $1.5 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Jean Merl
State Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance), widely viewed as a leading candidate in the crowded race to succeed Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Beverly Hills), has reported raising more than $600,000 for his campaign, with more than $579,000 left in his campaign coffers. According to a report filed with the Federal Election Commission on Tuesday, Lieu had brought in $621,762 by the March 31 end of the fundraising quarter; that included a $55,000 loan he made to his campaign. Lieu also reported an additional $66,000 in unpaid campaign bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Jean Merl
If there was ever any doubt that the race to succeed longtime Rep. Henry Waxman will be expensive, some of the campaign finance reports filed Tuesday should remove it. Fundraising and spending reports are due by midnight at the Federal Election Commission, but some candidates to succeed Waxman (D-Beverly Hills) filed a few hours earlier or provided copies of their reports to The Times. First-time candidate David Kanuth, a defense attorney, topped the list of early filers by declaring he had raised more than $798,000 by the March 30 end of the reporting period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | Jean Merl
State Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance), who is vying for a high-profile congressional seat, picked up the endorsement Sunday of the Pacific Palisades Democratic Club. The endorsement came after a club-sponsored forum featuring four of the 10 Democrats on the June 3 primary ballot to succeed retiring Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Beverly Hills). Club officials said they believed the forum would be more helpful to members if it included only the most viable contenders in their party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Jean Merl
 With the June 3 primary just weeks away, the pace is picking up in the 18-candidate race to succeed retiring longtime Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Beverly Hills).  A campaign mailer from spiritual teacher and bestselling author Marianne Williamson landed in some voters' mailboxes over the weekend, possibly the first piece of political mail of the race. Williamson, a former Democrat who switched her voter registration to "no party preference" as part of her stated goal to help break the partisan gridlock in Congress, asks voters to support a constitutional amendment to help "get money out of politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Jean Merl
Four Democrats have been battling for months over who was best suited to challenge Rep. Gary  Miller (R-Rancho Cucamonga) for his Inland Empire congressional seat. But when Miller announced in February that he wouldn't seek another term, he inadvertently laid the groundwork for a fight within his own party. The battle escalated Friday between Lesli Gooch, a longtime former Miller aide who has his endorsement, and Paul Chabot, a military officer/businessman. The Gooch campaign issued a news release announcing her endorsement by the San Bernardino County Republican Party.  "We must protect California's 31st District and keep it out of the hands of Nancy Pelosi," the GOP's county chairman, Assemblyman Curt Hagman of Chino Hills, said in a statement issued by the Gooch campaign.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1997
Judy Rosener and many others like her are running scared ("Standards of Meritocracy Don't Add Up," Feb. 2). They are scared because no longer will nebulous sex-based, race-based preferences be used to guarantee that they may handpick the future for applicants to jobs, schools and other opportunities. Instead, when applicants are compared, the person who has shown the most dedication, worked the hardest and achieved the most will have the opportunity to succeed. Her ridiculously simplistic argument is essentially that objective criteria alone are not sufficient to determine who will perform the best in a given situation.
SPORTS
January 25, 1999 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were friends at East Leyden High in Franklin Park, Ill., playing two-on-two football, catching a movie, hanging out at dances. The class of '70 selected one of them as the student "Most Likely to Succeed." They went their separate ways, started a career and a family, and although they have yet to renew acquaintances, by coincidence each moved to Denver where they now live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
The new inspector general for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is recommending that the county cut off its contracts with two longtime civilian monitoring agencies, concluding they had only limited success in helping the troubled department. If the board accepts his recommendations, it would mark the end of relationships with two of the nation's most widely respected police monitors. The inspector general, former L.A. County prosecutor Max Huntsman, said that both Michael Gennaco and Merrick Bobb had their successes and were supported by well-intentioned staffers.
SPORTS
March 15, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
A boy asked for a basketball game of one on one and Stanley Johnson accepted the challenge. One dunk, two dunks, three dunks … "That's not fair. Take it easy on me. " the boy said. But Johnson wasn't going to let up. After five dunks, the game was quickly over. Never mind that Johnson's opponent was 11 and not half his size. The All-American from Santa Ana Mater Dei High was sharing a lesson he learned from his mother. Johnson's competitive spirit and drive to excel have propelled him to one of the greatest careers enjoyed by a Southland high school basketball player.
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