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BUSINESS
May 10, 2013
The financial crisis fueled anger with the world's "takers" - those people who "like to get more than they give," in author Adam Grant's pithy definition. Everyone is searching for a sustainable formula for recovery that not only curbs damaging self-interest but also promotes a meaningful alternative. Here it is. Grant's new book, "Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success," published by Viking, is perfectly timed and beautifully weighted. An organizational psychologist, Grant crushes the assumption that me-first takers always reach the top of the ladder.
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SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | By Teddy Greenstein and Dan Wiederer
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Craig and Kevin Stadler ("Walrus" and "Smallrus") became the first father-son combo to play in the same Masters, but perhaps they're not the first family of this week's festivities. Check out the Haas household. Bill Haas overcome a first-hole bogey Thursday to shoot a four-under-par 68, good for the first-round lead. Father Jay Haas played in 22 Masters, making 19 cuts. Uncle Jerry Haas participated in 1985. An uncle from his mother's side, Dillard Pruitt, teed it up here in 1992 and '93. Oh, and great-uncle Bob Goalby won the 1968 event, avoiding a playoff after Argentina's Roberto De Vicenzo signed for the wrong Sunday score.
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NEWS
October 7, 2010
Two years ago, the National Bureau of Economic Research looked at what makes for successful CEOs, specifically those at companies involved in buyout and venture capital deals. "Success and performance are more strongly correlated with execution-type skills than with interpersonal and team-related skills," the report concluded in part. In other words, being able to get things done trumped being a good team player or a nice guy or gal. OK, so does that translate to maintaining physical fitness?
SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | By Chris Foster
UCLA receiver Kenneth Walker cut across the field, leaving cornerback Adarius Pickett in his wake Thursday. He snagged a pass and cruised into the end zone. This was good medicine. Walker was concerned at times last fall, worrying about his future. He spent the season on the sideline after back surgery in June. “For a while, I was depressed,” he said. “I thought I was going to get lost in the shuffle. We only had one receiver leave. Everyone else was back and played.
SPORTS
March 13, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
PEORIA, Ariz. -- It wasn't the debut Sean Burnett had been hoping for: giving up two runs and four hits in a third of an inning during the Angels' 8-6 loss to the San Diego Padres on Wednesday. But for Angels Manager Mike Scioscia, simply seeing Burnett on the mound marked a big step forward for the left-hander. "Just getting out there and getting the wraps off is important," Scioscia said of Burnett, who was pitching in a game for the first time this spring after being slowed by back problems.
OPINION
August 2, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
Why does a typical bus driver in the U.S. earn a monthly disposable income (after taxes) of $1,594, while a typical bus driver in Peru earns $325? Why does an airline pilot here bring home $4,206 a month, while a pilot in Lithuania doing what we hope is pretty much the same job with the same training makes only $1,674? (These figures, from worldsalaries.org , use 2005 dollars, adjusted for the actual purchasing power of various currencies.) Well, the explanation is obvious, isn't it?
BUSINESS
April 25, 2012 | By David Lazarus
It's Apple's world. We just live in it. The tech giant has reported another blowout quarter , with its profit almost doubling. Strong demand for the new and improved iPad, plus gotta-have-it iPhone sales in China and other overseas ports of call, keep putting the cha-ching in Apple's bling. It's no secret how the company does it. Apple makes innovative products, it makes them well, and it constantly improves those products. This allows the company to charge a hefty price for its wares -- a price that consumers everywhere have been willing to pay. So here's the question: Why don't more businesses follow Apple's example?
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Three and a half years ago, Rick Nahmias found a use for the untended citrus trees he saw in his Valley neighborhood. He organized volunteers and began harvesting the food for people in need, giving birth to Food Forward with one 85-pound harvest. His idea blossomed, and Food Forward announced that it had picked a million pounds of fruit. This week,  it begins “harvesting” at a new location: farmers markets. The Farmers Market Recovery Program begins Wednesday in Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | By David Colker
If Hugh Hefner strove to put a suave, air-brushed image on sexual freedom in the 1960s, rival publisher Al Goldstein was the polar opposite. Unabashedly abrasive and foul-mouthed, the cigar-chomping, obese Goldstein called his explicit magazine Screw and seemingly reveled in giving the middle-finger sign not only to his enemies but also the world at large via an 11-foot sculpture of the gesture outside his Florida home. "To be angry is to be alive," Goldstein - who aggressively championed free speech rights - said in a New Times Broward-Palm Beach interview in 2001.
OPINION
September 27, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
If, as seems possible, Mitt Romney is not elected U.S. president on Nov. 6, he will not be the first presidential candidate to run on the issue of competence and then lose because he ran an incompetent campaign. He will not even be the first governor of Massachusetts to do so. In 1988, Michael Dukakis, who was ahead in the polls just after the Democratic convention, declared in his acceptance speech: "This election isn't about ideology. It's about competence. " Then he proceeded to blow his large lead and lose to George H.W. Bush, who turned out to be a tougher old bird than anyone suspected.
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | Doyle McManus
When Obamacare's first open-enrollment period ended last week, the tally was impressive: 7.1 million Americans signed up for insurance on federal and state exchanges by the March 31 deadline, several million more signed up for Medicaid and a whole lot of under-26 Americans got covered by their parents' plans. Those numbers represent a significant political victory for Democrats, making it highly unlikely that Republicans will be able to deliver on their promise to repeal the law. "You're not going to turn away 7 or 10 million people from insurance coverage," crowed Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.)
IMAGE
April 6, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt
Dee Dee Penny has a real penchant for black vintage garb, such as high-waisted glamazon shorts and sheer mesh tops, and second-skin leather jackets and mini-dresses. It's a gothic-meets-go-go-girl look that signals a readily identifiable aesthetic for Penny - and one that might work well for an indie pop band. Enter the Dum Dum Girls. Penny (born Kristin Gundred in San Leandro, Calif.) created the Girls as a solo project in 2008. Now she's the fashionable frontwoman of a five-member group, comprising drummer Sandra Vu, bassist Malia James and guitarists Jules Medeiros and Andrew Miller, on tour to promote their third studio album, "Too True," released on Sub Pop Records in January.
OPINION
April 5, 2014
Re "The quest for diversity," Editorial, March 28 Your editorial on Proposition 209 and diversity at California's public universities is unclear and patronizing. It is unclear in endorsing as the benchmark of "meaningful racial diversity" the University of California's "diversity goals" - goals that the university has not itself enunciated. One can try and divine what the university's goals are, but with little success. Apparently, exceeding the pre-Proposition 209 minority enrollment (except for African American students at Berkeley and UCLA)
SPORTS
April 1, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
The two towers approach delivered a single, familiar result. Another Lakers loss. Pau Gasol got his wish, the chance to play next to fellow 7-footer Chris Kaman, but nothing really changed Tuesday in a 124-112 victory by the Portland Trail Blazers at Staples Center. Gasol and Kaman didn't show much chemistry together, but was that surprising at all this season? BOX SCORE: Portland 124, Lakers 112 Also in the predictable file: Steve Nash left in the second quarter because of a sprained left ankle.
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Mike Trout could have another monster season. Albert Pujols and Josh Hamilton could bounce back from career-worst years. Joe Smith and Sean Burnett could add much-needed depth and reliability to the bullpen. And it might not matter. For the Angels to end their four-year playoff drought, they will need six months of consistently strong pitching from a rotation that has little margin for error or injury. The projected starters should be better than the 2013 group, though inexperience at the back of the rotation is a cause for concern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By David Colker
Lorenzo Semple Jr. was one of the hottest screenwriters in Hollywood in the 1970s and '80s, working on star-studded films such as "Papillon," with Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman; "Three Days of the Condor," headlined by Robert Redford; and "Never Say Never Again," Sean Connery's last movie as James Bond. But, rare in the trade, Semple didn't much mind if he was not the sole writer on a film. "Almost all the good scripts I've been involved in, I've been fired off of for one reason or another," he said in a 2011 video interview conducted by the Writers Guild Foundation.
SPORTS
July 31, 2009 | DIANE PUCIN, ON SPORTS MEDIA
What a pleasure it was to speak with Irv Cross this week. Cross, 70, is the recipient of this year's Pro Football Hall of Fame Pete Rozelle Radio-Television award. He will be honored Aug. 7 at the enshrinees dinner in Canton, Ohio, with the other Class of 2009 enshrinees -- Bob Hayes, Randall McDaniel, Bruce Smith, Derrick Thomas, Ralph Wilson Jr. and Rod Woodson. In 1971, Cross became the first African American sports analyst on national television.
NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Jennifer Lopez and Marc Anthony's decision to split just days ago shocked fans and music pundits alike. With similar backgrounds and levels of success, theirs seemed like a Hollywood marriage that would last. But reports edging their way out in the aftermath have indicated that the Lopez-Anthony union was not as blissful as it may have seemed -- and that the success that the singer-actress has seen recently may have played a role in the separation. Did J.Lo's marriage fall victim to a variant of the "Oscar curse"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
After stepping down as Los Angeles County sheriff in January, Lee Baca largely has avoided the spotlight. Former aides don't know how to reach him. Reporters looking to interview him have been rebuffed. His last tweet was a link to his farewell address. But this week, Baca took center stage once again - this time as a guest speaker at a Loyola Marymount lecture hall where he offered a contemplative, and at times, self-critical view of his 15-year tenure. Speaking to a group of undergraduates Tuesday night, Baca said his biggest regret as sheriff was spending too much of his time at public events instead of managing his department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Dozens of students rallied at a meeting of the California State University governing board Wednesday, chanting and hoisting signs that urged the chancellor and trustees to roll back "success fees" that are raising costs on many campuses. More than 100 students marched in front of the police-guarded entrance of the chancellor's Long Beach office shouting, "We got 99 problems and student debt is one," and "No cuts, no fees, education should be free. " Campuses in San Diego and Fullerton recently joined nine others in enacting the fees to help pay for more classes, faculty hiring, counseling and other services.
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