Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSuccession
IN THE NEWS

Succession

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
The new inspector general for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is recommending that the county cut off its contracts with two longtime civilian monitoring agencies, concluding they had only limited success in helping the troubled department. If the board accepts his recommendations, it would mark the end of relationships with two of the nation's most widely respected police monitors. The inspector general, former L.A. County prosecutor Max Huntsman, said that both Michael Gennaco and Merrick Bobb had their successes and were supported by well-intentioned staffers.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
San Diego State University is the latest Cal State campus to impose a mandatory "student success fee," a controversial new charge that critics have blasted as a sidestep around the system's commitment to freeze tuition. Students in the fall will pay $50, with the fee increasing over the next four years to $200 per semester. This is in addition to the current annual tuition of $5,472 and other campus-based enrollment fees that average more than $1,200. The San Diego campus was among several -- Fullerton, Dominguez Hills and Fresno -- that were considering the success fees to help pay for basic educational services such as faculty hiring, increased class offerings, counseling and other needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Don Heckman
Med Flory, an alto saxophonist and founder of the Grammy-winning jazz group Supersax in addition to being an actor who appeared on numerous TV series, has died. He was 87. His son, Rex, who cared for his father during several years of heart maladies, reported that Flory died Wednesday at his home in North Hollywood. Flory had not been professionally active over the last few years, a shift from the busy demands of a career stretching over six decades. One of Hollywood's most unusual hyphenates, he was successful in two creatively demanding arenas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By David Colker
Comedian David Brenner, who vaulted to fame through his appearances on the "Tonight Show" in the 1970s, died at home in New York on Saturday. The cause was cancer, said his former publicist, Jeff Abraham, who issued a statement on behalf of Brenner's family. He was 78. Brenner was working as recently as December, with club dates in Toronto and other spots, Abraham said. The comedian was a favorite of "Tonight Show" host Johnny Carson at a time when appearances on the late-night program could ensure success for a comic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By James Rainey
At just 21, a kid from the San Fernando Valley named Jim Berk began work as a music teacher at Carson High School. Within a couple of years, the teacher, not much older than some of his students, had turned a woebegone marching band into one of the best in Southern California. Then Berk moved to struggling Hamilton High School to launch a music magnet program. It gained national acclaim and so many new students that officials reversed their threat to close the Westside campus. "The Wunderkind of education" the Times dubbed him in 1992.
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Let's start by calling "student success fees" what they really are - thinly disguised tuition increases charged to students for basic educational services. These fees, which are being levied at many California State University campuses, can cost up to $1,000 a year, on top of the official tuition, which has nearly doubled since 2007 to about $5,500. Not counting room or board. Because Gov. Jerry Brown's 2014-15 budget would increase state funding by more than $140 million, Cal State has agreed to freeze tuition.
SPORTS
March 10, 2014 | Helene Elliott
It wasn't the shiny glass and steel of Honda Center that made Randy Carlyle feel nostalgic Monday. Nor was it conducting the Toronto Maple Leafs' morning skate beneath the Stanley Cup banner he helped the Ducks win in 2007. The sight of two people, anonymous to fans but touchstones to him, brought out the mellow side of this gruff, old-school coach when he returned to Anaheim for the first time since the Ducks fired him on Nov. 30, 2011. "When you meet the parking lot attendant, the guy at the top of the ramp that you know, and he's the guy that used to look after your wife and your kids when you came to the rink and he was always a big happy guy to say hello, it's an emotional time to see him," Carlyle said.
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | By Jim Peltz
LAS VEGASĀ  - "I love coming back here," Jimmie Johnson said of Las Vegas, but it's not to gamble or take in a show. "Vegas is fun but it's really, just in my mind, a racing town," he said. And Johnson, the reigning NASCAR Sprint Cup champion, might as well be its honorary mayor. As he seeks a record-tying seventh Cup title this year, Johnson already holds the record for most Cup wins at Las Vegas Motor Speedway with four. Yet, he has had something of a drought at the 1.5-mile oval located 15 miles northeast of the Strip.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Mary McNamara
Four seasons ago a quartet of young women began receiving threatening, and very well informed texts, from the mysterious "A," who they assumed was their former queen bee Alison, presumed dead. So you can imagine their shock. Now, of course, they know Alison is alive and well, as is "Pretty Little Liars. " It quickly became ABC Family's break-out hit and the most tweeted about series in television, setting a template now followed by every other show, including, most recently, the Oscars.
OPINION
March 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Less than a decade after it started requiring students to write an essay as part of the SAT, the College Board announced Wednesday that it is eliminating that portion of the test. At the same time, it will do away with certain obscure vocabulary words and the penalty for inaccurate guesses. These are good moves, but they don't answer the fundamental question of whether the standardized test should continue to be a part of the college application process, especially after a new study found that it is a poor predictor of whether students will succeed in college.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|