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Sucralose

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NEWS
April 2, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first major new artificial sweetener in a decade--a sugar substitute made from sugar but 600 times sweeter and without calories. Sucralose, which will be available in stores within the next few months, was approved for widespread use--from a plain table-top sugar substitute to an additive in food products ranging from sodas to sauces. It is manufactured by McNeil Specialty Products, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, of New Brunswick, N.
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HEALTH
October 20, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
With the variety of chic diet sodas expanding faster than the contents of a CO 2 canister, we asked a few Times staffers to sample a dozen brands in a variety of flavors, such as cola, grape soda and root beer. Here are their thoroughly unscientific reviews: Clear winners Cascade Ice Acai Blueberry Pomegranate (sweetened with sucralose): "I enjoy this as a less sugary option to fruit juice. It's light but still has the berry taste. " Hank's Diet Root Beer (sweetened with aspartame)
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HEALTH
October 20, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
With the variety of chic diet sodas expanding faster than the contents of a CO 2 canister, we asked a few Times staffers to sample a dozen brands in a variety of flavors, such as cola, grape soda and root beer. Here are their thoroughly unscientific reviews: Clear winners Cascade Ice Acai Blueberry Pomegranate (sweetened with sucralose): "I enjoy this as a less sugary option to fruit juice. It's light but still has the berry taste. " Hank's Diet Root Beer (sweetened with aspartame)
HEALTH
July 9, 2001 | PATRICIA KING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sandy Resnick and her family used to revel in sugary desserts such as huge, hot, chocolate chip cookies with melting vanilla ice cream, chocolate sauce and whipped cream. But that was before Resnick's 12-year-old daughter, Leah, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Resnick started realizing how often the family would turn to sugar as a "very, very available quick fix for hunger."
HEALTH
July 9, 2001 | PATRICIA KING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sandy Resnick and her family used to revel in sugary desserts such as huge, hot, chocolate chip cookies with melting vanilla ice cream, chocolate sauce and whipped cream. But that was before Resnick's 12-year-old daughter, Leah, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Resnick started realizing how often the family would turn to sugar as a "very, very available quick fix for hunger."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999
Q: Is sucralose safe? A: Sucralose is a new artificial sweetener that has been approved for use in beverages, baked goods and other foods, and as a table-top sugar substitute. It is made from the natural sugar sucrose by chemically adding three chlorine atoms to its backbone and is an estimated 600 times sweeter than sugar. Because of the chlorine atoms, sucralose is not digested and passes through the body unchanged. Unlike a similar fat substitute, it does not cause fecal leakage or diarrhea.
SCIENCE
December 16, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Canadian researchers think they have found a great way to trace the travels of treated sewage after it is discharged into rivers: Follow the artificial sweeteners. The scientists found elevated concentrations of four sweeteners - cyclamate, saccharin, sucralose, and acesulfame - in water samples collected along the length of the Grand River in Ontario, Canada.   Commonly used in diet drinks, the sweeteners got into the Grand by way of the 30 sewage treatment plants that empty into the river and its tributaries.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
The next battle in the Splenda wars is about to begin. A hearing in a false-advertising lawsuit against the company that makes the sweetener is scheduled for Monday in federal court in Los Angeles. Filed by five U.S. sugar companies, the suit claims McNeil Nutritionals has deliberately misled consumers with its "made from sugar, tastes like sugar" advertising campaign. "We believe it is manipulation on an important subject," said Dan Callister, a lawyer for the Sugar Assn. Inc.
HEALTH
September 8, 2003 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
A new, low-calorie sweetener is making its U.S. debut in a diet frozen cola drink, but it may not be long before you find it in breakfast cereals, brownies, ice cream, candies and energy bars. The commercial launch of tagatose, which has 92% of the sweetness of table sugar, came with the introduction of 7-Eleven's Diet Pepsi Slurpee.
HEALTH
October 20, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
It's been 60 years since diet soda first burst on the scene with a sugar-free ginger ale known as No-Cal that catered to diabetics. Then came RC Cola's Diet Rite, followed by Tab, Fresca and a slew of sugar-free versions of Pepsi and Coca-Cola that seem to be in perpetual states of reformulation to accommodate customers' fickle tastes. Today, it isn't just colas that are going on a diet. The market for no-calorie sodas has become as effervescent as the beverages themselves, with an ever-expanding palette of exotic flavors such as coconut, pomegranate and coffee - many of them from small companies that are developing loyal followings catering to customers' thirst for carbonated indulgence without the sugar.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first major new artificial sweetener in a decade--a sugar substitute made from sugar but 600 times sweeter and without calories. Sucralose, which will be available in stores within the next few months, was approved for widespread use--from a plain table-top sugar substitute to an additive in food products ranging from sodas to sauces. It is manufactured by McNeil Specialty Products, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, of New Brunswick, N.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1990 | Items were compiled and edited by Grassroots Research, a unit of the San Francisco money management firm of RCM Capital Management
A roundup of business developments spotted by other publications.Items were compiled and edited by Grassroots Research, a unit of the San Francisco money management firm of RCM Capital Management. Modest Rebound: A look at the Gulf states suggests an upswing in the oil industry. The rig count in Louisiana rose again last week by four units to 143, an increase over the 12 rigs in the same week a year ago.
HEALTH
July 19, 2004 | Alice Lesch Kelly, Special to The Times
Americans love artificial sweeteners. We stir saccharin into our coffee, drink cola sweetened with aspartame, and chew gum flavored with sorbitol -- all in an attempt to enjoy the sweet taste we crave without the calories we're trying to avoid. One thing we haven't been able to do, however, is to bake successfully with artificial sweeteners. Replace the sugar in a cake recipe with an artificial sweetener, and you're likely to bake a pale, off-tasting cake.
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