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NEWS
April 4, 1993 | From Associated Press
A man was convicted Friday of drug tampering in the 1991 deaths of two people and the near-fatal poisoning of his wife. A juror called the defendant "a remorseless liar." Joseph E. Meling was found guilty of putting cyanide-filled capsules into packages of Sudafed 12-hour decongestant in an attempt to kill his wife for $700,000 in life insurance, and of putting the capsules in five other packages to make it appear she was the victim of a random killer.
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SPORTS
February 11, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Unlike their NBA counterparts, NHL players are staying in the Olympic Village here. The rooms are small and the beds are short, but defenseman Scott Stevens of the New Jersey Devils says players can make do. "We're going to be so tired, we could probably sleep on the floor and sleep well," he said. Defenseman Chris Pronger of the St. Louis Blues joked that he knew he was an Olympian "when I got into my room and saw I have no TV and I can't order room service."
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SPORTS
February 7, 1998 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD
Guy Hebert, goaltender for Team USA and the Mighty Ducks, and Anaheim Coach Pierre Page on Friday voiced differing opinions about the ongoing controversy over the alleged abuse of Sudafed by NHL players. Hebert disagreed with a recent Sports Illustrated article that claimed as many as 20% of NHL players use it to get a boost before games. But Page agreed wholeheartedly with the story. The drug is banned by the IOC and there has been concern that NHL players will test positive for it in Nagano.
SPORTS
February 7, 1998 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD
Guy Hebert, goaltender for Team USA and the Mighty Ducks, and Anaheim Coach Pierre Page on Friday voiced differing opinions about the ongoing controversy over the alleged abuse of Sudafed by NHL players. Hebert disagreed with a recent Sports Illustrated article that claimed as many as 20% of NHL players use it to get a boost before games. But Page agreed wholeheartedly with the story. The drug is banned by the IOC and there has been concern that NHL players will test positive for it in Nagano.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | United Press International
Burroughs Wellcome Co. announced Friday it is returning Sudafed 12-hour cold medication to the market in tablet form after cyanide-laced capsules killed two people in Washington state. Burroughs Wellcome recalled Sudafed 12-hour capsules in March after the reports of three poisonings--two of them fatal--from Sudafed capsules that had been tampered with. To date, there have been no arrests.
SPORTS
February 5, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Despite widespread warnings, the chief Olympic drug tester said Wednesday he expects some hockey players to be banned from the Winter Games for using Sudafed, an over-the-counter cold medication. "Sudafed is not an accepted substance," said Dr. Makoto Ueki, director of the International Olympic Committee drug testing laboratory in Nagano, Japan. "It is prohibited, even for colds. It cannot be used." Ueki said he expects the medication to show up in testing of some NHL players in the Olympics.
SPORTS
February 7, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, From Staff and Wire Reports
Rene Fasel, president of the International Ice Hockey Federation, said he does not anticipate any drug-related problems involving hockey players, despite recent reports that many NHL players use Sudafed, a cold remedy that contains an ingredient on the International Olympic Committee's list of banned substances. Fasel also said he had spoken with Dr.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ and DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Each day this week, at 8 a.m. and at 5 p.m., a group of 12 Burroughs Wellcome senior executives have met with one overriding mission: to save Sudafed's good name. It won't be easy. In recent weeks, two people in Washington state have died and another was seriously injured after taking tainted Sudafed capsules containing cyanide. On March 3, the company ordered a nationwide recall of the decongestant. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration soon followed with its own recall order.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Daneker had been married only one day when she went to get some over-the-counter medicine in her bathroom. When she did not return, her husband called her, then rapped on the closed door. He tried to open the door but it would not budge. He forced it open only to find her unconscious body slumped on the floor, authorities said.
SPORTS
February 11, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Unlike their NBA counterparts, NHL players are staying in the Olympic Village here. The rooms are small and the beds are short, but defenseman Scott Stevens of the New Jersey Devils says players can make do. "We're going to be so tired, we could probably sleep on the floor and sleep well," he said. Defenseman Chris Pronger of the St. Louis Blues joked that he knew he was an Olympian "when I got into my room and saw I have no TV and I can't order room service."
SPORTS
February 7, 1998 | HELENE ELLIOTT, From Staff and Wire Reports
Rene Fasel, president of the International Ice Hockey Federation, said he does not anticipate any drug-related problems involving hockey players, despite recent reports that many NHL players use Sudafed, a cold remedy that contains an ingredient on the International Olympic Committee's list of banned substances. Fasel also said he had spoken with Dr.
SPORTS
February 5, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Despite widespread warnings, the chief Olympic drug tester said Wednesday he expects some hockey players to be banned from the Winter Games for using Sudafed, an over-the-counter cold medication. "Sudafed is not an accepted substance," said Dr. Makoto Ueki, director of the International Olympic Committee drug testing laboratory in Nagano, Japan. "It is prohibited, even for colds. It cannot be used." Ueki said he expects the medication to show up in testing of some NHL players in the Olympics.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | From Associated Press
Joseph Meling was sentenced to life in prison without parole Tuesday for the Sudafed-tampering deaths of two people and a failed attempt to kill his wife for $700,000 in insurance money. He angrily maintained his innocence. Prosecutors said that Meling tried to kill his wife, Jennifer, with a cyanide-filled capsule for the insurance and that he put similar capsules in five other Sudafed packages on store shelves to divert suspicion from himself. Jennifer Meling survived the Feb.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | From Associated Press
A man was convicted Friday of drug tampering in the 1991 deaths of two people and the near-fatal poisoning of his wife. A juror called the defendant "a remorseless liar." Joseph E. Meling was found guilty of putting cyanide-filled capsules into packages of Sudafed 12-hour decongestant in an attempt to kill his wife for $700,000 in life insurance, and of putting the capsules in five other packages to make it appear she was the victim of a random killer.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A man was convicted of drug tampering in the 1991 deaths of two people and the near-fatal poisoning of his wife. Joseph E. Meling was found guilty of putting cyanide-filled capsules into packages of Sudafed 12-hour decongestant in an attempt to kill his wife for $700,000 in life insurance, and of putting the capsules in five other packages to make it appear she was the victim of a random killer.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months after two Washington state residents died after taking Sudafed 12-hour cold capsules laced with cyanide, federal authorities Monday announced the arrest of a 31-year-old former insurance salesman who they say planted the poisoned medicine to conceal a scheme to murder his wife for insurance money. A 20-count indictment filed in Seattle charges Joseph Earl Meling of Olympia with product tampering, mail fraud and perjury. Authorities claim that the former Prudential Insurance Co.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The manufacturer of Sudafed nasal decongestant said it plans to market a tablet form to replace capsules recalled after two people died of cyanide poisoning. Burroughs Wellcome Co. of Research Triangle Park, N.C., said surveys showed that 85% of Sudafed customers would purchase the tablet form of the drug. The FBI is continuing an investigation into the apparent drug tamperings. Two people in Washington state died and a third became ill from taking cyanide-laced Sudafed 12 Hour Capsules.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | From Associated Press
Joseph Meling was sentenced to life in prison without parole Tuesday for the Sudafed-tampering deaths of two people and a failed attempt to kill his wife for $700,000 in insurance money. He angrily maintained his innocence. Prosecutors said that Meling tried to kill his wife, Jennifer, with a cyanide-filled capsule for the insurance and that he put similar capsules in five other Sudafed packages on store shelves to divert suspicion from himself. Jennifer Meling survived the Feb.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | United Press International
Burroughs Wellcome Co. announced Friday it is returning Sudafed 12-hour cold medication to the market in tablet form after cyanide-laced capsules killed two people in Washington state. Burroughs Wellcome recalled Sudafed 12-hour capsules in March after the reports of three poisonings--two of them fatal--from Sudafed capsules that had been tampered with. To date, there have been no arrests.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The manufacturer of Sudafed nasal decongestant said it plans to market a tablet form to replace capsules recalled after two people died of cyanide poisoning. Burroughs Wellcome Co. of Research Triangle Park, N.C., said surveys showed that 85% of Sudafed customers would purchase the tablet form of the drug. The FBI is continuing an investigation into the apparent drug tamperings. Two people in Washington state died and a third became ill from taking cyanide-laced Sudafed 12 Hour Capsules.
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