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WORLD
July 16, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- One day, President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir of Sudan was walking down the red carpet in Abuja, the capital of Nigeria, flanked by the presidential guard, on an official visit to attend an African Union summit on AIDS. The next day, after a flurry of legal threats and calls for his arrest, he was gone. Bashir, indicted by the International Criminal Court, has become perhaps Africa's most embarrassing guest. In many African countries, the protests against Bashir begin even  before he arrives.
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WORLD
April 21, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The United Nations on Monday condemned ethnic killings by South Sudan rebels that left hundreds of people dead last week after the fall of an oil town to the opposition forces. The world body said the killings took place in Bentiu, the hub of the country's main oil producing region in the north.  U.N. spokesman Joe Contreras said in a statement that some members of the rebel Sudan Peoples Liberation Movement in Opposition broadcast hate messages on radio after taking control of Bentiu, urging certain ethnic groups to leave town.
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WORLD
October 24, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Sudan on Wednesday accused Israel of launching an airstrike that caused a large explosion at a munitions factory, killing two people, in a residential area of the capital, Khartoum. Sudan Information Minister Ahmed Belal Osman said that four planes bombed the Yarmouk complex housing a military arms factory in the south of the capital and that an analysis of rocket debris from the explosion confirmed Israel was behind the attack. "We think Israel did the bombing," Belal said.
OPINION
March 6, 2014
Re "Disillusionment over South Sudan," March 1 South Sudan's recent descent into violence brings to light the dangers of premature American disengagement from countries burdened by conflict. U.S. leaders and diplomats spent years ending two decades of war between the Sudanese government and an independence movement in South Sudan, investing significant time, energy and resources to forge a peace agreement, support a popular referendum and create an independent South Sudan. Our government hailed the outcome as a great victory.
NEWS
April 24, 1989 | From Reuters
Railways in Sudan were paralyzed Sunday by a strike by employees demanding back salary, a Khartoum newspaper reported. The newspaper Al Ayam said Sudan railways' 33,000 workers obeyed a call for a five-day strike Saturday and reported that it was 100% successful.
OPINION
June 2, 2002
Re "Panel Frowns on Efforts to Buy Sudan Slaves' Freedom," May 28: The Times has circulated old, discredited allegations against the only program that has liberated black jihad-slaves in Sudan. The American Anti-Slavery Group has traveled to Sudan to investigate slavery and slave redemption. We have interviewed redeemed slaves, Arab slave retrievers, local chiefs and church leaders. Our investigations, together with those of other independent researchers, have confirmed that Christian Solidarity International is indeed liberating slaves whom the United Nations agencies and most of the human rights community have betrayed for nearly two decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1999
Re "As in South Africa, It's Time to Let Our Wallets Do the Talking," Commentary, Aug. 30: Eric Reeves makes several erroneous statements about Talisman Energy and Sudan. There is a long-standing civil war in Sudan, of complex origins, in which tribal rivalries play a major complicating role. Fighting is associated with cattle-raiding and hostage-taking, traditionally settled by exchanging hostages for cattle. This is abhorrent activity but not normally called "slavery." Reeves alleges clearance of populations near the oil development.
WORLD
January 30, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Police clashed with tribesmen Saturday in the Red Sea coastal city of Port Sudan, leaving at least 14 people dead and 16 injured, a government official said. The United Nations said police fired on peaceful demonstrators.
OPINION
January 3, 1999
Lovisa Stannow's compassion for the appalling situation in southern Sudan appears sincere, as witnessed by her arduous and heart wrenching stint in a feeding center (Commentary, Dec. 27). However, her article would have been much more effective without the minimizing of the American space program through the repeated snide references to John Glenn's heroic and well-deserved space shuttle trip. It is clear that Americans are caring and giving individuals. Our voluminous charity starts at home and extends to the far corners of the Earth, even where we are unwelcome.
WORLD
July 7, 2004 | From Reuters
U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan urged an African Union summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to back peace in Sudan's vast Darfur area, saying the crisis there threatened to destabilize the region if attacks on civilians were not stopped. Sudan reluctantly agreed to the deployment of about 300 African Union troops to protect truce monitors in Darfur. Fighting in the region blamed on Arab militias has driven more than a million people from their homes and killed as many as 30,000.
WORLD
March 1, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan - South Sudan was one of the most ambitious state-building projects that global donors have ever undertaken: Take a newly minted, resource-rich country with some of the world's worst poverty, health and education problems, pour in aid, assistance and diplomatic advice and hope for the best. Instead, the African nation descended into ethnic warfare and chaos in December, less than three years after it won independence. Some now question the wisdom of the U.S. and others in pouring billions of dollars into a place long-racked by staggering corruption, poor governance and ethnic violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Documentary filmmakers are known to go to extraordinary lengths to get their stories on film, but few have gone as far as Hubert Sauper. In order to achieve the unusual access to the reality of Africa he provides in his exceptional "We Come as Friends," which premiered last month at Sundance in Park City, Utah, and is screening Saturday at the Berlin International Film Festival, Sauper flew into the continent on a tiny ultra-light airplane he...
WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan -- Toddlers tottering in the dust, elderly men sitting in the shade to escape the sapping heat, clustering flies, the drifting smoke of cooking fires and the sour smell of too many people crowded into a small space. If things are bad now at the displaced-persons camp near the main U.N. peacekeeping base in Juba, South Sudan, they'll soon be much worse. The rains are coming within months. They'll bring malaria, mud, perhaps cholera, and make life in these camps even more miserable.
WORLD
February 4, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan - Toddlers tottering in the dust, elderly men sitting in the shade to escape the sapping heat, clustering flies, the drifting smoke of cooking fires, and the sour smell of far too many people crowded into a small space. If things are bad now at the displaced persons camp near the main U.N. peacekeeping base in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, they'll soon be much worse. The rains are coming. By April or May they'll bring malaria, mud, perhaps cholera, and make life in these camps even more miserable.
WORLD
January 31, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
MALAKAL, South Sudan - The looters came by the thousands. They were organized, systematic and took their time. At two World Food Program warehouses in this dusty South Sudanese town, they opened thousands of USAID cans of vegetable oil and poured the contents into stolen jerry cans. They ripped open packets of high-nutrition food and took the contents. They stole computers, light fittings, fans and roof tiles, and even cut away the canvas from storage tents. The food they took - 1,700 tons in all - would have fed more than 100,000 families for a month.
WORLD
January 16, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Both sides in South Sudan's new war have committed "appalling crimes," according to a Human Rights Watch report Thursday, offering a grim picture of massacres, ethnic killings and looting of humanitarian aid. The organization said a credible independent investigation was required, calling on the African Union to broaden its planned inquiry into atrocities to make it "truly independent and credible. " It also called for United Nations sanctions against individuals found to be responsible for crimes.
WORLD
July 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The European Union joined the United States in pushing for U.N. sanctions against Sudan if it did not end the conflict in its western Darfur region. The EU's 25 foreign ministers urged the Sudanese government to implement a July 3 promise to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan to crack down on pro-government Arab militias, improve security and provide better access for relief efforts.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Despite peace talks under way in Ethiopia, government forces and rebels in South Sudan continued fighting for control of key oil-producing venues, driving more people to flee their homes to escape the deadly clashes. More than 250 people drowned when an overloaded boat capsized while fleeing the Upper Nile state capital of Malakal as rebel forces were said to be advancing on the oil town, the Nigeria Guardian reported. "The boat drowned with about 255 people on board -- only two children have been rescued," Upper Nile state Information Minister Philip Jiben was quoted by the newspaper as saying.
WORLD
January 4, 2014 | By Stephanie Findlay
PRETORIA, South Africa - Face-to-face peace talks between warring parties in South Sudan were stalled Saturday, government officials and rebel delegations said, dashing hopes of a swift end to the bloodshed. Representatives of President Salva Kiir's government and rebels loyal to his former vice president, Riek Machar, began preliminary negotiations through mediators in neighboring Ethiopia on Friday. The talks are seen as a step toward ending the violence that has killed at least 1,000 people, driven tens of thousands from their homes and threatens to plunge the world's newest country into civil war. But a cease-fire appeared to be a long way off Saturday as government and rebel delegations in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, reported that direct talks in the Sheraton Hotel had been delayed as the two parties work through the mediators to set a negotiating agenda.
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