Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSudan Airways
IN THE NEWS

Sudan Airways

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | United Press International
Egypt has barred Sudan Airways flights from crossing Egyptian airspace when flying to Jordan, published reports said Thursday. Sudan is one of the few Arab nations to support Iraq'sinvasion of Kuwait.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 4, 2004 | Robert I. Rotberg, Robert I. Rotberg is director of the Kennedy School of Government's Belfer Center Program on Intrastate Conflict at Harvard University and president of the World Peace Foundation.
It is no longer a secret that more than 50,000 mostly black unfortunates have been killed in Darfur, Sudan, and that several hundred thousand more are refugees, lingering in forlorn camps within the nation or in neighboring Chad. Yet the killing goes on. Even as the world watches, as many as 10,000 people are continuing to die each month from combat and disease. If the world wants to stop this continued genocide, Washington and the United Nations need to squeeze Sudan much harder.
Advertisement
WORLD
July 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
A Sudan Airways jet crashed early today shortly after taking off from Port Sudan airport, killing 105 passengers and 11 crew members, officials said. Only a child survived. The Boeing 737 was on a flight to the capital, Khartoum, when its captain reported trouble, the director of Sudan Airways, Ahmed Ismail Zumrawi, told Sudan News Agency. Sudanese television cited a "technical failure" as the cause. The plane crashed near the Port Sudan airport on the Red Sea, the news agency said.
WORLD
July 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
A Sudan Airways jet crashed early today shortly after taking off from Port Sudan airport, killing 105 passengers and 11 crew members, officials said. Only a child survived. The Boeing 737 was on a flight to the capital, Khartoum, when its captain reported trouble, the director of Sudan Airways, Ahmed Ismail Zumrawi, told Sudan News Agency. Sudanese television cited a "technical failure" as the cause. The plane crashed near the Port Sudan airport on the Red Sea, the news agency said.
NEWS
August 25, 1986
Up to two million people face starvation in southern Sudan, where the downing of a civilian airliner by rebels eight days ago has dimmed hopes for a negotiated end to a three-year-old bush war, officials in Cairo said. The downing of the Sudan Airways plane that killed all 60 aboard dealt a blow to peace talks between the government of Prime Minister Sadek Mahdi and the rebel Sudan People's Liberation Army.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sudan Airways planes parked in neat rows at Khartoum's sand-swept, palm-fringed airport represent the most practical way to get around this vast, undeveloped country. But a U.N. Security Council vote coming up soon could leave these aircraft grounded for a long time. With the support of the United States, the council is expected to decide in the next few weeks to finally implement a resolution passed in August banning foreign air travel by Sudanese aircraft.
NEWS
August 18, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Rebels armed with shoulder-fired missiles shot down a Sudan Airways airliner, killing all 60 people aboard, the official Sudan News Agency said Sunday. The attack came 24 hours after the rebel Sudanese People's Liberation Army threatened to fire on all aircraft flying over their territory. The news agency said the crash occurred Saturday, shortly after the Fokker Friendship twin-propeller plane took off from the Malakal airport for Khartoum.
OPINION
October 4, 2004 | Robert I. Rotberg, Robert I. Rotberg is director of the Kennedy School of Government's Belfer Center Program on Intrastate Conflict at Harvard University and president of the World Peace Foundation.
It is no longer a secret that more than 50,000 mostly black unfortunates have been killed in Darfur, Sudan, and that several hundred thousand more are refugees, lingering in forlorn camps within the nation or in neighboring Chad. Yet the killing goes on. Even as the world watches, as many as 10,000 people are continuing to die each month from combat and disease. If the world wants to stop this continued genocide, Washington and the United Nations need to squeeze Sudan much harder.
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | BLAINE HARDEN, The Washington Post
He calls himself Dr. John. He is a burly man with a bald head and a Mennonite-style beard flecked with gray. He earned his doctorate in Iowa and punctuates his conversation with such words as " a priori " and "irrespective." He has an American-bred taste for fresh strawberries and peanut ice cream. But the rebel war that he directs, which has all but sealed off southern Sudan to relief food, threatens 2 million people with starvation.
NEWS
August 18, 1986 | Associated Press
The International Red Cross today suspended emergency food shipments to southern Sudan after rebels in the area warned that relief flights were not immune from attack. The warning came as the rebels took responsibility for shooting down a Sudan Airways plane on Saturday. All 60 people aboard the plane were killed. (Story, Page 5.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sudan Airways planes parked in neat rows at Khartoum's sand-swept, palm-fringed airport represent the most practical way to get around this vast, undeveloped country. But a U.N. Security Council vote coming up soon could leave these aircraft grounded for a long time. With the support of the United States, the council is expected to decide in the next few weeks to finally implement a resolution passed in August banning foreign air travel by Sudanese aircraft.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | United Press International
Egypt has barred Sudan Airways flights from crossing Egyptian airspace when flying to Jordan, published reports said Thursday. Sudan is one of the few Arab nations to support Iraq'sinvasion of Kuwait.
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | BLAINE HARDEN, The Washington Post
He calls himself Dr. John. He is a burly man with a bald head and a Mennonite-style beard flecked with gray. He earned his doctorate in Iowa and punctuates his conversation with such words as " a priori " and "irrespective." He has an American-bred taste for fresh strawberries and peanut ice cream. But the rebel war that he directs, which has all but sealed off southern Sudan to relief food, threatens 2 million people with starvation.
NEWS
August 25, 1986
Up to two million people face starvation in southern Sudan, where the downing of a civilian airliner by rebels eight days ago has dimmed hopes for a negotiated end to a three-year-old bush war, officials in Cairo said. The downing of the Sudan Airways plane that killed all 60 aboard dealt a blow to peace talks between the government of Prime Minister Sadek Mahdi and the rebel Sudan People's Liberation Army.
NEWS
August 18, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Rebels armed with shoulder-fired missiles shot down a Sudan Airways airliner, killing all 60 people aboard, the official Sudan News Agency said Sunday. The attack came 24 hours after the rebel Sudanese People's Liberation Army threatened to fire on all aircraft flying over their territory. The news agency said the crash occurred Saturday, shortly after the Fokker Friendship twin-propeller plane took off from the Malakal airport for Khartoum.
WORLD
July 11, 2003 | From Associated Press
A 3-year-old Sudanese boy who was the sole survivor of a plane crash that killed 116 people will be flown aboard a medically equipped plane to London for surgery, doctors and relatives said Thursday. The president of the United Arab Emirates, Sheik Zayed ibn Sultan al Nuhayyan, will charter a plane from Germany to fly to the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, and pick up the boy, Mohammed Fateh Osman. The child, whose mother was killed in the crash, was in stable condition in a Khartoum hospital.
NEWS
August 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Armed Iraqi hijackers surrendered Tuesday after freeing all passengers and crew members aboard a Sudanese airliner, ending a 16-hour drama that began on a flight from Sudan to Jordan. All the hostages were unharmed. Seven Iraqis, some carrying guns, were arrested shortly after noon at London's Stansted Airport. Essex County police spokeswoman Heather Watts said late Tuesday that no further arrests were anticipated.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|