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NEWS
April 13, 1987
A Sudanese court reduced to 10 years the life sentence imposed last year on former Vice President Omar Tayeb for his role in transporting thousands of Ethiopian Jews through Sudan to Israel in late 1984 and early 1985. The Appeals High Court said the life term and consecutive 30-year sentence reflected the political climate in Sudan in the wake of the 1985 coup that deposed President Jaafar Numeiri, in whose government Tayeb served.
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NEWS
November 4, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past eight years, 17-year-old Martin Marial has shared a small mud-and-thatch hut with five other boys in a dusty, fly-infested refugee camp in northwestern Kenya. His parents are long dead. His bed has been a wicker mat; his bath, a tin bowl; his toilet, a hole in the ground; his one meal a day, a mushy mixture of ground corn and water. But his life has been consumed by one obsession: getting a good education.
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NEWS
November 4, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past eight years, 17-year-old Martin Marial has shared a small mud-and-thatch hut with five other boys in a dusty, fly-infested refugee camp in northwestern Kenya. His parents are long dead. His bed has been a wicker mat; his bath, a tin bowl; his toilet, a hole in the ground; his one meal a day, a mushy mixture of ground corn and water. But his life has been consumed by one obsession: getting a good education.
NEWS
April 13, 1987
A Sudanese court reduced to 10 years the life sentence imposed last year on former Vice President Omar Tayeb for his role in transporting thousands of Ethiopian Jews through Sudan to Israel in late 1984 and early 1985. The Appeals High Court said the life term and consecutive 30-year sentence reflected the political climate in Sudan in the wake of the 1985 coup that deposed President Jaafar Numeiri, in whose government Tayeb served.
WORLD
August 27, 2006 | Tim Jones, Chicago Tribune
Paul Salopek, a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune, was charged with espionage and two other criminal counts in a Sudanese court Saturday, three weeks after he was detained by pro-government forces in the war-torn province of Darfur. Salopek, 44, who was on a freelance assignment for National Geographic magazine, was arrested with his interpreter and driver, both Chadian nationals. If convicted, they could be imprisoned for years.
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