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NEWS
April 4, 1989
Sudanese lawmakers approved a government plan to end a six-year rebellion in the south of the impoverished African nation, but they appeared undecided about a rebel demand that they suspend harsh Islamic laws. The uncertainty jeopardizes the agreement, which would pave the way for talks with the African-descended Christian and animist rebels. Fundamentalists of Sudan's majority ethnic Arab Muslims have promised stiff--and possibly violent--opposition.
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OPINION
September 10, 2009
Re "Sudan jails woman who wore pants," Sept. 8, and "Woman jailed for wearing pants freed," Sept. 9 Sudan is an Islamic country and therefore follows the rules of its religion, but jailing a woman for wearing pants in public has little to do with religion. This is purely about controlling and keeping women down, to the point where any clothing that resembles a man equals power and frightens countries like Sudan. I lived in Iran for 10 years and personally saw my female relatives suffer from such ridiculous laws.
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NEWS
February 26, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Mohammed Idem never denied that he was caught with a load of stolen auto parts in his car after his two cohorts fled on foot. But he would have liked a chance to plead that the poverty of his life with a wife, six children, his father, mother and brother had driven him to thievery. That might have mitigated his sentence. Instead, Idem had no opportunity to speak before the Islamic judge at his trial, which lasted the briefest part of an afternoon.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | Reuters
A Sudanese businessman was hanged Sunday for illegally possessing $115,000 in foreign currency in the first reported execution under the junta that seized power in June. Magdy Mahgoub was executed at Khartoum's Kobar prison in defiance of a strongly worded appeal from the United States seeking reprieves for people sentenced to death by military courts.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The military rulers of Sudan are planning to revive Islamic sharia laws, Sudanese and diplomatic sources in Khartoum said. The Islamic laws are fiercely opposed by non-Muslim rebels fighting a civil war in the south, and their revival in the mainly Arab and Muslim north would diminish hopes of peace. The Sudan People's Liberation Army has been fighting a civil war since 1983 in the Christian and animist south.
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | Reuters
A Sudanese businessman was hanged Sunday for illegally possessing $115,000 in foreign currency in the first reported execution under the junta that seized power in June. Magdy Mahgoub was executed at Khartoum's Kobar prison in defiance of a strongly worded appeal from the United States seeking reprieves for people sentenced to death by military courts.
OPINION
September 10, 2009
Re "Sudan jails woman who wore pants," Sept. 8, and "Woman jailed for wearing pants freed," Sept. 9 Sudan is an Islamic country and therefore follows the rules of its religion, but jailing a woman for wearing pants in public has little to do with religion. This is purely about controlling and keeping women down, to the point where any clothing that resembles a man equals power and frightens countries like Sudan. I lived in Iran for 10 years and personally saw my female relatives suffer from such ridiculous laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1986 | ABDULLAHI AHMED AN-NA'IM, Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im, a member of the law faculty at the University of Khartoum, is a visiting professor at UCLA School of Law.
One year ago this week a devout elderly Muslim, Mahmoud Mohammed Taha, was publicly hanged in Sudan's capital for the "offense" of defending the faith against radical fanaticism. He went to his death in a brutal manner as 2,000 fanatics cheered with shouts of Allah akbar --"God is great."
WORLD
August 27, 2006 | Tim Jones, Chicago Tribune
Paul Salopek, a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune, was charged with espionage and two other criminal counts in a Sudanese court Saturday, three weeks after he was detained by pro-government forces in the war-torn province of Darfur. Salopek, 44, who was on a freelance assignment for National Geographic magazine, was arrested with his interpreter and driver, both Chadian nationals. If convicted, they could be imprisoned for years.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The military rulers of Sudan are planning to revive Islamic sharia laws, Sudanese and diplomatic sources in Khartoum said. The Islamic laws are fiercely opposed by non-Muslim rebels fighting a civil war in the south, and their revival in the mainly Arab and Muslim north would diminish hopes of peace. The Sudan People's Liberation Army has been fighting a civil war since 1983 in the Christian and animist south.
NEWS
April 4, 1989
Sudanese lawmakers approved a government plan to end a six-year rebellion in the south of the impoverished African nation, but they appeared undecided about a rebel demand that they suspend harsh Islamic laws. The uncertainty jeopardizes the agreement, which would pave the way for talks with the African-descended Christian and animist rebels. Fundamentalists of Sudan's majority ethnic Arab Muslims have promised stiff--and possibly violent--opposition.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Mohammed Idem never denied that he was caught with a load of stolen auto parts in his car after his two cohorts fled on foot. But he would have liked a chance to plead that the poverty of his life with a wife, six children, his father, mother and brother had driven him to thievery. That might have mitigated his sentence. Instead, Idem had no opportunity to speak before the Islamic judge at his trial, which lasted the briefest part of an afternoon.
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