Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSudan Politics
IN THE NEWS

Sudan Politics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sudanese army units took up positions around the nation's capital Monday as citizens of Africa's largest country anxiously waited to see if forces loyal to parliament Speaker Hassan Turabi would dare to fight an emergency decree imposed by his rival for power, President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Islamic ideologue Hassan Turabi formed his own party a day after he was replaced as head of Sudan's ruling National Congress party. Thousands of Turabi's supporters gathered outside his house in Khartoum, the capital, to celebrate the founding of the Popular National Congress party. President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir has been stripping power from Turabi, a hard-line Islamist and anti-Westerner who was once Sudan's kingmaker.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventeen years ago, huge sums of development money pouring into Sudan were going to transform this vast land into a breadbasket for the Middle East. A conciliatory Sudanese president was in the process of forging a lasting peace with the rebellious south. A Sudanese union with Egypt was to ensure that moderate Arabs controlled the Nile. But none of that happened. Today, Sudan instead finds itself cut adrift by old Western and Arab friends, a renegade that last August was placed on the U.S.
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sudanese army units took up positions around the nation's capital Monday as citizens of Africa's largest country anxiously waited to see if forces loyal to parliament Speaker Hassan Turabi would dare to fight an emergency decree imposed by his rival for power, President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir.
NEWS
December 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
The president dissolved parliament on Sunday and declared a three-month state of emergency. The moves, to take effect today, apparently were part of a struggle within Sudan's leadership and came as parliament considers amendments to the country's constitution that would have curbed the powers of the president. "There are dangers against the country from abroad, and internal problems that will aggravate the country's problems will not be allowed," Lt. Gen.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a gala parade, a presidential address to the nation, fireworks and a special session of the National Assembly, Sudan's Islamic leaders on Wednesday began what they are dubbing a new era of constitutional legitimacy for this war-torn country. The reason for the festivities disturbing this hot, sleepy capital this week was the adoption of a new constitution, which, on paper at least, promises to turn Sudan into a federal, multi-party democracy.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Islamic ideologue Hassan Turabi formed his own party a day after he was replaced as head of Sudan's ruling National Congress party. Thousands of Turabi's supporters gathered outside his house in Khartoum, the capital, to celebrate the founding of the Popular National Congress party. President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir has been stripping power from Turabi, a hard-line Islamist and anti-Westerner who was once Sudan's kingmaker.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is the graveyard of good intentions. On the outskirts of this town, the capital of Kordofan province and the epicenter of one of the worst famines to strike this region in many years, about 40,000 destitute Sudanese have camped, awaiting shipments of relief food. On this day, El Obeid's displaced are huddled against the force of a dry, hot wind--the haboub , which fills the air with sand and makes the squat, round tukuls , or huts, only dimly visible.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stifling heat of spring lies on the backs of the Blue Nile and the White Nile where they meet here on this dusty plain. The result is soporific. A driver, arms and head sprawling from his taxi's window, snores. A soldier lets his rifle dangle in the dirt as his chin dips onto his chest. Men in white robes and turbans droop under the few trees along the river.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | ANTHONY SHADID, ASSOCIATED PRESS
From his not-so-ivory tower, he witnessed Sudan's defining moments: the fall of military dictators, the birth of a militant Islamic movement, the student protests that shook governments. Professor Adlan al-Hardallu, who has spent 30 years at Khartoum University, is witnessing another such moment. Seven years after an Islamic-based government took power, the university and other colleges in Africa's biggest nation are losing a battle over their long-respected academic freedom.
NEWS
December 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
The president dissolved parliament on Sunday and declared a three-month state of emergency. The moves, to take effect today, apparently were part of a struggle within Sudan's leadership and came as parliament considers amendments to the country's constitution that would have curbed the powers of the president. "There are dangers against the country from abroad, and internal problems that will aggravate the country's problems will not be allowed," Lt. Gen.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a gala parade, a presidential address to the nation, fireworks and a special session of the National Assembly, Sudan's Islamic leaders on Wednesday began what they are dubbing a new era of constitutional legitimacy for this war-torn country. The reason for the festivities disturbing this hot, sleepy capital this week was the adoption of a new constitution, which, on paper at least, promises to turn Sudan into a federal, multi-party democracy.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | ANTHONY SHADID, ASSOCIATED PRESS
From his not-so-ivory tower, he witnessed Sudan's defining moments: the fall of military dictators, the birth of a militant Islamic movement, the student protests that shook governments. Professor Adlan al-Hardallu, who has spent 30 years at Khartoum University, is witnessing another such moment. Seven years after an Islamic-based government took power, the university and other colleges in Africa's biggest nation are losing a battle over their long-respected academic freedom.
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventeen years ago, huge sums of development money pouring into Sudan were going to transform this vast land into a breadbasket for the Middle East. A conciliatory Sudanese president was in the process of forging a lasting peace with the rebellious south. A Sudanese union with Egypt was to ensure that moderate Arabs controlled the Nile. But none of that happened. Today, Sudan instead finds itself cut adrift by old Western and Arab friends, a renegade that last August was placed on the U.S.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stifling heat of spring lies on the backs of the Blue Nile and the White Nile where they meet here on this dusty plain. The result is soporific. A driver, arms and head sprawling from his taxi's window, snores. A soldier lets his rifle dangle in the dirt as his chin dips onto his chest. Men in white robes and turbans droop under the few trees along the river.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is the graveyard of good intentions. On the outskirts of this town, the capital of Kordofan province and the epicenter of one of the worst famines to strike this region in many years, about 40,000 destitute Sudanese have camped, awaiting shipments of relief food. On this day, El Obeid's displaced are huddled against the force of a dry, hot wind--the haboub , which fills the air with sand and makes the squat, round tukuls , or huts, only dimly visible.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Paul Richter, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
WASHINGTON - Sen. John F. Kerry pledged at his confirmation hearing Thursday that as  secretary of State he would emphasize “the extraordinary good” America does abroad and not just the less popular U.S. foreign policy of “deployments and drones.”   Appearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, on which he has sat for 28 years, the Massachusetts Democrat stressed the peaceful side of America's foreign presence, including its...
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | DALIA BALIGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The 32 pyramids cluster majestically atop a black sandstone hill in the Sudanese desert, visible for miles. But the only people who see them are the Bedouins--who take them for granted, just as their forefathers have for thousands of years--and an occasional foreigner. It is a royal burial site from the ancient Meroitic civilization, which rivaled the Pharaonic empire of ancient Egypt to the north.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|