Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSudan Relief
IN THE NEWS

Sudan Relief

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The online hangout MySpace.com will organize 20 concerts featuring bands promoted on its site as part of a campaign to raise awareness and money for humanitarian relief in Sudan. The site, which grew in popularity thanks to emerging bands and their fans, has in recent months taken a more active role in social causes, such as environmental awareness and voter registration.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The online hangout MySpace.com will organize 20 concerts featuring bands promoted on its site as part of a campaign to raise awareness and money for humanitarian relief in Sudan. The site, which grew in popularity thanks to emerging bands and their fans, has in recent months taken a more active role in social causes, such as environmental awareness and voter registration.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | From Reuters
More than three million of Sudan's 23 million people will need relief food this year, the official Sudan news agency reported.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Sudanese rebels declared a three-month cease-fire to allow food shipments to reach hundreds of thousands of hungry people. The government agreed to a one-month truce. The Sudan People's Liberation Army said its cease-fire applies Bahr el Ghazal province in the southwest. The rebels have been fighting the government in Khartoum since 1983 for autonomy for the mainly black and non-Muslim south from the Arab and Muslim north. An estimated 1.
NEWS
January 18, 1991 | Associated Press
The United Nations has postponed a hunger relief drive for more than 7 million people in Sudan, fearing anti-U.N. riots in that Iraqi-allied East African nation, officials said Thursday. Officials speaking on condition of anonymity said a senior U.N. official who was expected to travel to Khartoum, Sudan's capital, has delayed his trip for safety reasons. The U.S.-allied force that attacked Iraq on Thursday was acting under a U.N. resolution authorizing use of force.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sudan Airways planes parked in neat rows at Khartoum's sand-swept, palm-fringed airport represent the most practical way to get around this vast, undeveloped country. But a U.N. Security Council vote coming up soon could leave these aircraft grounded for a long time. With the support of the United States, the council is expected to decide in the next few weeks to finally implement a resolution passed in August banning foreign air travel by Sudanese aircraft.
NEWS
March 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
A top U.S. official, saying "it's a race against time," called Friday for nations around the world, including the Soviet Union, to do more to support an international famine-relief effort organized during a break in Sudan's civil war. "Everybody wants peace, but peace will be a hollow victory if the people for whom peace is the goal are not alive because we can't deliver the food in time to save them," said Julia V.
NEWS
April 19, 1989
Sudan relief organizers said bureaucracy, slow donor support and bad planning have forced them to reduce a relief effort intended to save millions of people in the southern Sudan war zone from starvation and malnutrition. Officials of Operation Lifeline-Sudan said they now expect the organization to provide less than half the 100,000 tons of relief goods believed necessary if a second consecutive summer disaster is to be avoided. U.N. organizers have given up their goal of completing the $132-million operation by the end of April and say it will continue as long as allowed by the rains, which normally begin in May.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | Associated Press
Sudanese rebels abducted three American and one British Christian aid workers from their homes in southern Sudan during an early morning raid, officials said Wednesday. "The armed men identified themselves as members of the SPLA, the Sudanese People's Liberation Army," said Dan Bitrus, executive director of the Nairobi-based Assn. of Christian Resource Organizations Serving Sudan (ACROSS).
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | From Reuters
For a lucky few in the besieged, refugee-jammed Sudanese city of Juba, $350 can buy space on a packed cargo plane to Khartoum. For others, there is virtually no escape. Refugees said that the Sudanese army is preventing thousands of frightened civilians from fleeing to rebel-held territory outside the town to escape shellfire, food shortages and the threat of rebel attack.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sudan Airways planes parked in neat rows at Khartoum's sand-swept, palm-fringed airport represent the most practical way to get around this vast, undeveloped country. But a U.N. Security Council vote coming up soon could leave these aircraft grounded for a long time. With the support of the United States, the council is expected to decide in the next few weeks to finally implement a resolution passed in August banning foreign air travel by Sudanese aircraft.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | Reuters
Sudanese rebels have hijacked a relief aid barge steaming down the White Nile, taking prisoner the 11 U.N. staff on board, the United Nations said Friday. Spokesman Joe Sills said radio contact with the barge, filled with food, was lost four days ago as it attempted to deliver relief supplies to people living in both government and Sudanese People Liberation Army-controlled areas. U.N.-leased planes subsequently spotted the barge and confirmed that the U.N. staff was being held prisoner.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White Nile, which sweeps dreamily through long miles of sand, thorn bushes and waterlilies, for more than a year formed a silent barrier that held fast the unsettling secrets of this war-torn region, the heart of Africa's largest country. Then, in recent months, relief flights began landing again at a barren airstrip carved into the dirt at the edge of this town, providing a window into the interior of Sudan's civil war.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of thousands of sick and starving people could die in southern Sudan unless they are sent more food and medicine soon, the U.S. ambassador to Sudan said Thursday. Ambassador Donald Petterson said the suffering in the southern part of Africa's largest nation is comparable to that of neighboring Somalia, where a U.S.-led military force intervened to restore order and guard aid shipments.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | From Associated Press
Twelve aid workers helping thousands of refugees in southern Sudan were withdrawn Wednesday, and a U.N. official said they will not be returned until warring factions can guarantee their safety. On Tuesday, officials confirmed that rebels had killed a U.N. employee and a Norwegian free-lance journalist. Two other relief workers were missing. Thomas Ekvall, the head of U.N.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Islamic government here, saying it has undertaken a huge urban cleanup campaign, has forced hundreds of thousands of squatters and refugees from Sudan's southern civil war into remote desert camps, threatening them with disease, hunger and death as the temperature climbs, international relief workers and diplomats say.
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Famine has reached crisis proportions in Sudan where up to 11 million people face severe hunger and hundreds of thousands may die, U.S. officials said. Sudan has the most serious situation of six African nations experiencing food shortages, the officials told a House panel on hunger. Between 33 million and 35 million Africans are at risk in Sudan, Mozambique, Angola, Liberia, Ethiopia and Somalia. Officials said Africa's problems have been overshadowed by the plight of Kurdish refugees.
NEWS
December 25, 1991 | Associated Press
More than 13 million people facing starvation in Ethiopia and Sudan will need 1.5 million tons of food aid in 1992 despite higher-than-average harvests this year, a U.N. agency said Monday. The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said 6.1 million drought victims, displaced people and demobilized soldiers and their families in Ethiopia will need 880,000 tons of emergency food.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | Associated Press
The government has approved a U.N. plan to airdrop relief supplies to tens of thousands of Sudanese refugees in the war-weary nation's south, a U.N. official said Sunday. The refugees were forced to return home from neighboring Ethiopia after the ouster of former President Mengistu Haile Mariam, who was the main supporter of the rebel Sudan People's Liberation Army. The rebels have been fighting in southern Sudan for autonomy since 1983. James Ingram, executive director of the U.N.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|