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Sudanese Liberation Movement

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WORLD
July 26, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush urged a key Sudanese rebel leader to help rein in violence in the troubled Darfur region. Bush met for about 40 minutes in the Oval Office with Sudanese Liberation Movement leader Minni Minnawi, the result of Minnawi's decision to accept a peace agreement designed to end what the United States calls genocide in western Sudan. The president asked Minnawi to support the U.S.
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WORLD
September 22, 2007 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
united nations -- If Sudan swiftly supports peacekeepers and talks to end the conflict in Darfur, the world will help rebuild the beleaguered region, ministers and other senior officials from more than two dozen nations said Friday in a high-level meeting on the region's crisis.
WORLD
May 5, 2006 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
After intense Western pressure and last-ditch efforts Thursday to negotiate an agreement to end the three-year conflict in Sudan's Darfur region, one of the rebel groups said it would not sign a proposed peace accord. The talks, aimed at putting an end to violence described by the U.S. as genocide, continued into the early morning today, though African Union mediators in the Nigerian capital, Abuja, had said there would be no major extension of the midnight deadline.
WORLD
August 3, 2007 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
At the moment, the headquarters of Abdel Wahid's faction of the Sudanese Liberation Movement is a cafe in Paris. "I may be in exile, but my people know I am still with them," says Wahid, reaching into his bag and pulling out four cellphones and a chunky Thuraya satellite phone with its thumb-like antenna. "This one is for the commanders, so I can tell them what to do and what not to do. This," he said, holding up a newer Nokia, "is for civil society so we can discuss their next move.
WORLD
July 11, 2008 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The International Criminal Court's chief prosecutor will ask judges to issue an arrest warrant for the president of Sudan next week on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity, diplomats and an official close to the case said Thursday. The prosecutor, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, issued a statement Thursday announcing that he would submit evidence of crimes committed against civilians in Sudan's western region of Darfur over the last five years, though he will wait until Monday at the pretrial chamber to name names.
OPINION
October 28, 2003 | Colin L. Powell
Today we stand on the brink of an agreement to end Sudan's cruel civil war and bring one of the greatest and longest-running humanitarian tragedies in the world to an end. Almost since gaining independence from Britain in 1956, Sudan has been engulfed in conflict between its central government, dominated by northern Arabs, and the Christian and animist population of its south.
OPINION
January 3, 2014 | By Nancy A. Aossey and William Garvelink
Once virtually eradicated, polio again stalks the Horn of Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. The innocent victims are mostly young children. The perpetrators are insurgents and indifferent governments. The polio resurgence is preventable and it is time to pull out an old but proven technique to halt its spread: Days of Tranquility. This 30-year-old quaintly named tactic involves a negotiated cease-fire during which insurgents and governments allow humanitarian groups to reach children trapped by fighting and immunize them against infectious diseases, such as polio.
WORLD
September 20, 2007 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Here on the territorial edge of one of the world's most intractable crises, U.N. peacemaker Jan Eliasson looks a gray-bearded tribal leader in the eye and tells him that there are moments in history that can make the difference between peace and more war. Talks are taking place aimed at solving the conflict in the Darfur region of Sudan, and the elder, called the makhtoum of Nyala, needs to persuade a rebel leader from his tribe to join in, Eliasson says.
WORLD
March 1, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JUBA, South Sudan - South Sudan was one of the most ambitious state-building projects that global donors have ever undertaken: Take a newly minted, resource-rich country with some of the world's worst poverty, health and education problems, pour in aid, assistance and diplomatic advice and hope for the best. Instead, the African nation descended into ethnic warfare and chaos in December, less than three years after it won independence. Some now question the wisdom of the U.S. and others in pouring billions of dollars into a place long-racked by staggering corruption, poor governance and ethnic violence.
OPINION
June 10, 1990 | Edward A. Gargan, Edward A. Gargan, who was the West Africa Bureau chief for the New York Times, is now the Edward R. Murrow Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations
"Out! Get out of the car," the man with the Kalashnikov commanded, waving a black hand-grenade with his left hand. "Walk into the town." Soft thumps of mortars being fired rolled down the valley toward us. Sembete was being shelled. A jalopy of a bus stuffed with travelers clattered up behind our Land Cruiser. The armed man ordered them out of the bus and told them to walk into town. From time to time he shouted to colleagues hidden above us somewhere on the escarpment.
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