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Sudden Cardiac Death

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NEWS
November 13, 1994 | from Associated Press
Men who complain of high anxiety are up to six times more likely than calmer men to suffer sudden cardiac death, researchers say. Anxiety is proving to be one of the strongest risk factors for sudden cardiac death, even more so than smoking, said Dr. Ichiro Kawachi, assistant professor of health and social behavior at the Harvard School of Public Health. Sudden cardiac death is an electrical phenomenon that throws off the rhythm of the heart.
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SCIENCE
June 20, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Actor James Gandolfini's death at age 51 from an apparent cardiac arrest while in Rome shocked fans and friends alike. But sudden cardiac arrest, a misunderstood term, is all too common, cardiologists say. The "Sopranos" actor was taken from his hotel in Rome to Umberto I hospital, where 40 minutes of doctors' efforts to revive him -- including massaging his heart -- were unsuccessful, emergency room chief Dr. Claudio Modini told Reuters....
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NEWS
March 6, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The fatal frenzy of the heart that on Sunday apparently killed college basketball star Hank Gathers takes the lives of about 400,000 Americans each year. Experts say one reason may be that physicians as well as patients underestimate early warning signs that could lead to sudden cardiac death.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
The stimulant medications used to treat ADHD in adults do not increase patients' risk of heart attack, stroke or sudden cardiac death, according to a study published online Monday by the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Researchers identified more than 150,000 people from around the country between the ages of 25 and 64 who took the drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and compared each of them to two people of the same age and gender who did not take the drugs.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Exercising or having sex could increase chances of having a cardiac event in the short-term, although the overall risk is low and decreases with regular exercise, a study finds. Researchers analyzed 14 studies looking at the effects of exercise and sex on sudden cardiac death and myocardial infarction, or heart attack. They found periodic physical activity was associated with a 3.5-times increased risk of heart attack, and occasional sexual activity was linked with a 2.7-times increased risk of heart attack.
NEWS
October 1, 2010
Screening athletes for hidden heart problems seems like a wonderful idea on the surface -- why not try to prevent young athletes from dying via an electrocardiograph test? But the subject is controversial. While some physicians and researchers advocate mandatory ECG screenings, others insist the screenings are a bad idea, considering the high rate of false positive results, the extremely low death rates, and the fact that nonathletes can die from undetected heart abnormalities as well.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
The stimulant medications used to treat ADHD in adults do not increase patients' risk of heart attack, stroke or sudden cardiac death, according to a study published online Monday by the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Researchers identified more than 150,000 people from around the country between the ages of 25 and 64 who took the drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and compared each of them to two people of the same age and gender who did not take the drugs.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Sad news from the Dodge Rock 'n' Roll Los Angeles half-marathon that took place downtown Sunday: Thirty-seven-year-old Charles Whitmore Riske of Costa Mesa died just short of the finish line. While Riske's cause of death has not yet been determined, deaths during marathons are rare, studies show. A 1996 study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that deaths were low in two marathons held over a combined 30-year period. During the Marine Corps Marathon from 1976 to 1994 and the Twin Cities marathon from 1982 to 1994, 215,413 runners competed.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
More athletes are fatally collapsing on basketball courts, in swimming pools and on playing fields than once thought, new research has found, with 1 in 44,000 NCAA athletes dying of sudden cardiac death per year. The numbers  are especially interesting in the context of screening costs.   Researchers have looked for effective ways to screen athletes before they start competing, but not everyone has agreed the benefits would outweigh the cost. Perhaps the new statistics might tip the equation toward more screening, at least for some athletes.
HEALTH
March 9, 1998 | MARTIN MILLER
If you found yourself without your toothbrush, would you be willing to use someone else's? About one-third of people would rather let plaque build up than stick a foreign brush in their pie hole, according to a survey commissioned by Mentadent ProCare Toothbrush. Twenty-three percent of women and 16% of men said they'd be willing to use their child's toothbrush in a pinch. Conversely, just 5% of both men and women would be willing to share their toothbrush with their own mothers.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Sad news from the Dodge Rock 'n' Roll Los Angeles half-marathon that took place downtown Sunday: Thirty-seven-year-old Charles Whitmore Riske of Costa Mesa died just short of the finish line. While Riske's cause of death has not yet been determined, deaths during marathons are rare, studies show. A 1996 study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that deaths were low in two marathons held over a combined 30-year period. During the Marine Corps Marathon from 1976 to 1994 and the Twin Cities marathon from 1982 to 1994, 215,413 runners competed.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
More athletes are fatally collapsing on basketball courts, in swimming pools and on playing fields than once thought, new research has found, with 1 in 44,000 NCAA athletes dying of sudden cardiac death per year. The numbers  are especially interesting in the context of screening costs.   Researchers have looked for effective ways to screen athletes before they start competing, but not everyone has agreed the benefits would outweigh the cost. Perhaps the new statistics might tip the equation toward more screening, at least for some athletes.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Exercising or having sex could increase chances of having a cardiac event in the short-term, although the overall risk is low and decreases with regular exercise, a study finds. Researchers analyzed 14 studies looking at the effects of exercise and sex on sudden cardiac death and myocardial infarction, or heart attack. They found periodic physical activity was associated with a 3.5-times increased risk of heart attack, and occasional sexual activity was linked with a 2.7-times increased risk of heart attack.
NEWS
October 1, 2010
Screening athletes for hidden heart problems seems like a wonderful idea on the surface -- why not try to prevent young athletes from dying via an electrocardiograph test? But the subject is controversial. While some physicians and researchers advocate mandatory ECG screenings, others insist the screenings are a bad idea, considering the high rate of false positive results, the extremely low death rates, and the fact that nonathletes can die from undetected heart abnormalities as well.
HEALTH
April 5, 2010 | By Holly Selby, Special to the Baltimore Sun
Since 1980, when a physician at the Johns Hopkins Hospital first implanted a defibrillator in a human being, doctors have found that the devices can halt sudden cardiac death in many patients whose hearts have weakened pumping ability, as well as some who have suffered a heart attack. But a recent study by researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center shows that about half of all patients who meet nationally accepted guidelines for treatment with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, known as ICDs, are not receiving the recommended treatment.
SCIENCE
March 2, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein
Screening young athletes for heart abnormalities with an electrocardiogram test may be a cost-effective way to identify at-risk youth and save lives, according to a new study. But the findings may also add fuel to what has become an often emotional debate. Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine examined sudden cardiac deaths among U.S. high school and college athletes aged 14 to 22 and conducted a calculation to see what influence various types of screenings would have.
SCIENCE
June 20, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Actor James Gandolfini's death at age 51 from an apparent cardiac arrest while in Rome shocked fans and friends alike. But sudden cardiac arrest, a misunderstood term, is all too common, cardiologists say. The "Sopranos" actor was taken from his hotel in Rome to Umberto I hospital, where 40 minutes of doctors' efforts to revive him -- including massaging his heart -- were unsuccessful, emergency room chief Dr. Claudio Modini told Reuters....
HEALTH
September 6, 1999 | MARNELL JAMESON
Straight out of stuffy old London comes the little book of "Don't: A Manual of Mistakes & Improprieties More or Less Prevalent in Conduct and Speech." First published circa 1880, this little gem was remarkably prescient in its advice concerning public health. Considering that 100 years ago our predecessors knew almost nothing of bacteria or how diseases spread and had no real respect for hand-washing, this book is remarkably--if tediously--on point.
HEALTH
September 6, 1999 | MARNELL JAMESON
Straight out of stuffy old London comes the little book of "Don't: A Manual of Mistakes & Improprieties More or Less Prevalent in Conduct and Speech." First published circa 1880, this little gem was remarkably prescient in its advice concerning public health. Considering that 100 years ago our predecessors knew almost nothing of bacteria or how diseases spread and had no real respect for hand-washing, this book is remarkably--if tediously--on point.
HEALTH
March 9, 1998 | MARTIN MILLER
If you found yourself without your toothbrush, would you be willing to use someone else's? About one-third of people would rather let plaque build up than stick a foreign brush in their pie hole, according to a survey commissioned by Mentadent ProCare Toothbrush. Twenty-three percent of women and 16% of men said they'd be willing to use their child's toothbrush in a pinch. Conversely, just 5% of both men and women would be willing to share their toothbrush with their own mothers.
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