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Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

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NEWS
April 13, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Susan Davis Greene and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times. Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Fatalities, 1983-'87 1983: Males: 32 Females: 22 1984: Males: 18 Females: 12 1985: Males: 33 Females: 13 1986: Males: 17 Females: 13 1987: Males: 19 Females: 14 Cases by age, 1987 Age Group Male Female Total 1 month 3 3 6 2 months 5 4 9 3 months 2 2 4 4 months 5 2 7 5 months 2 1 3 6 months 2 1 3 9 months 0 1 1 TOTAL 19 14 33 Most recent information available Source: State of California, Department of Health Service; Orange County...
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SPORTS
July 31, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
LONDON - Jamel Herring waited more than 10 years for his chance to get in an Olympic boxing ring. Once he was there, however, his stay proved agonizingly short, as he lasted only three one-sided rounds against Daniyar Yeleussinov of Kazakhstan, who won their opening round light-welterweight bout, 19-9, Tuesday. But although he may have lost the fight, Herring didn't lose his perspective. War, it seems, has a way of doing that to a person. "It's not the end of the world," he said, tugging at his dark blue boxing trunks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
A brain defect that affects breathing has been found in babies who died of sudden infant death syndrome. The babies had lower levels of neurotransmitters--signaling chemicals--in the part of the brain that controls breathing, a team from Harvard Medical School reports in the December issue of the Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology. The researchers studied the brains of 79 babies who died of SIDS.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II / For the Booster Shots blog
Death rates from unintentional injuries of children from birth to age 19 fell by nearly 30% in the United States from 2000 through 2009, largely because of a 41% drop in deaths in car crashes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday. That amounts to more than 11,000 children saved during the decade, Dr. Ileana Arias, principal deputy director of the CDC, said in a news conference. "The rate is among the worst of all high-income countries," she said, and the real shame is that most of the deaths "are predictable and preventable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2000
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission last month released a national survey showing that African Americans are more likely to place their babies to sleep in ways that increase the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The survey found that more than half of African American parents place their babies to sleep on their stomachs or sides and African Americans are more likely to place soft bedding such as quilts, comforters or pillows in the crib with their infants.
SCIENCE
July 28, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Hearing tests routinely administered to most newborns may soon be used to identify children who are at risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, according to Seattle researchers. Records of hearing tests administered to 62 infants in Delaware show that those who later died of SIDS had a unique pattern of partial hearing loss, according to a report this week in the journal Early Human Development. "This discovery opens a whole new line of inquiry into SIDS research," said lead author Dr.
NEWS
April 8, 1999 | HEIDI SHERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to decrease the number of deaths linked to sudden infant death syndrome, consumer and health groups are asking parents to dress their babies in warm nightclothes instead of wrapping them in quilts, sheepskins and blankets. The groups plan to release their recommendations at a news conference today, The Times has learned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1989 | BEN SULLIVAN, Times Staff Writer
For more than three decades, the leading cause of mortality in children less than a year old has been attributed to the same culprit--but researchers don't know what that culprit is. For lack of a better name it is called sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and it mysteriously claims the lives of roughly one in 500 previously healthy infants in that age range.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | BARRY BEARAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Between 1965 and 1971, five healthy babies were born here to a poor woman who seemed to want them desperately and who mourned each of their deaths with a convulsive grief that quavered the soul. At one funeral, Waneta Hoyt fainted after the lowering of the tiny, pitiful coffin and at another, her body collapsed with the great force of her sobbing. She had to be helped away from the freshly turned soil at the graveside.
NEWS
February 23, 1993 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is comforting to believe that the start of a new year brings us a clean slate, one that's untarnished by the previous year's insults to logic, order and happiness. For John and Linda Dryer, the New Year's slate, if it existed at all, stayed clean only for nine hours. John, 33, had gotten up about 8:30 a.m. on Jan. 1 and checked on his 10-week-old foster son, Andrew, who was asleep in a crib, before starting to work on a personal computer in the same room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
New findings by the Los Angeles County coroner's office and a prominent UCLA pediatrician "undermine and contradict" the evidence and expert testimony used to convict a woman of shaking her 7-week-old grandson to death 15 years ago, her attorneys have argued in a recent clemency petition to the governor. A review of the evidence against Shirley Ree Smith was ordered to assist Gov. Jerry Brown as he weighs whether to commute Smith's sentence of 15 years to life. Smith has already spent 10 years in prison for the death of baby Etzel Glass at a Van Nuys apartment on Nov. 30, 1996.
SPORTS
August 2, 2011 | By Broderick Turner
Lamar Odom's voice on the phone frequently was barely above a whisper. The pain clearly registered in words that flowed in stops and starts as he delivered a soliloquy about death and the effect it has had on his psyche. The Lakers forward spoke deliberately and expressed how emotional it has been for him to deal with two recent deaths. Odom attended a funeral in New York on July 13 for his 24-year-old cousin, who Odom said was murdered. The next day, Odom was a passenger in an SUV in Queens when it collided with a motorcycle.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
The flat-head look that more young children have been sporting has long been attributed to recommendations that babies be put to sleep on their backs. But researchers thought that a spike in such cases in Texas infants warranted a closer look. And they found that the cause was more complex. Researchers from the Texas Department of State Health Services looked in the Texas Birth Defects Registry to identify cases of plagiocephaly, a fancy word for a deformed skull. They found that between 1999 and 2007, the number of cases skyrocketed from 3 cases per 10,000 births to 29 per 10,000 births, an increase of 21% per year on average, the researchers reported online Monday in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. The largest increase was in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
From a second-floor room in skid row's Russ Hotel, Shirley Ree Smith spends sleepless nights listening to the knife fights and profanity-laced taunts of the drug dealers, pimps and brawlers who populate South San Julian Street. She ventures out after dark only as far as she needs to get cellphone reception for the nightly call from her daughter, Tomeka, in Kankakee, Ill. It is the emotional high point of each day spent looking for work no one will give her. Smith has been separated from her daughter and grandchildren for 14 years, since her arrest in the 1996 death of her 7-week-old grandson.
SCIENCE
July 28, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Hearing tests routinely administered to most newborns may soon be used to identify children who are at risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, according to Seattle researchers. Records of hearing tests administered to 62 infants in Delaware show that those who later died of SIDS had a unique pattern of partial hearing loss, according to a report this week in the journal Early Human Development. "This discovery opens a whole new line of inquiry into SIDS research," said lead author Dr.
HEALTH
December 5, 2005 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
If calming a wailing infant wasn't satisfying enough, pacifier-wielding parents can now quiet their critics as well. Since ancient times, parents have been placing pacifiers in their babies' mouths to comfort them, but some doctors, parenting experts and the occasional grandparent have suggested that pacifiers are substitutes for good parenting. Others have claimed that they are simply dangerous.
HEALTH
October 10, 2005 | Emily Singer, Special to The Times
MANY mothers like to keep their newborns in bed with them to bond and breastfeed. Now, after years of hedging about the wisdom of the practice, the American Academy of Pediatrics has said that sleeping in a bed with a baby can increase the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. "Bed-sharing during sleep is hazardous," says Dr. John Kattwinkel, chairman of the association's task force on SIDS and a neonatologist at the University of Virginia.
SCIENCE
August 21, 2004 | From Times staff and wire reports
A group of genes involved in early development may help explain why black babies are more at risk of sudden infant death syndrome than others in the U.S., researchers said Thursday. Researchers from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago found 11 different mutations in 14 of 92 SIDS cases but only one mutation -- the same one -- in two of the 92 healthy babies, they reported in the journal Pediatric Research. About 71% of the mutations were found in black babies.
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