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Sudden Unexpected Death Syndrome

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NEWS
July 4, 1988
Cases of the mysterious "sudden unexpected death syndrome" among Southeast Asian refugees have declined in most areas of the United States, but not in the San Joaquin Valley. Nationwide, 117 seemingly healthy men and one woman have died without warning since the first case was reported in 1981. The cases peaked nationwide in 1982--except in the San Joaquin Valley, where many Southeast Asians have moved to be with relatives.
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NEWS
March 24, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade-old medical mystery that has confounded investigators in the United States and Southeast Asia by killing young, apparently healthy Asian men in their sleep has taken a new turn with the deaths in a single day of two Thai construction workers in the island republic of Singapore. The two men, Wichit Khamwaen, 45, and Sitthi Sataisong, 27, apparently died in their sleep before dawn Monday.
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NEWS
March 6, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The fatal frenzy of the heart that on Sunday apparently killed college basketball star Hank Gathers takes the lives of about 400,000 Americans each year. Experts say one reason may be that physicians as well as patients underestimate early warning signs that could lead to sudden cardiac death.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The fatal frenzy of the heart that on Sunday apparently killed college basketball star Hank Gathers takes the lives of about 400,000 Americans each year. Experts say one reason may be that physicians as well as patients underestimate early warning signs that could lead to sudden cardiac death.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade-old medical mystery that has confounded investigators in the United States and Southeast Asia by killing young, apparently healthy Asian men in their sleep has taken a new turn with the deaths in a single day of two Thai construction workers in the island republic of Singapore. The two men, Wichit Khamwaen, 45, and Sitthi Sataisong, 27, apparently died in their sleep before dawn Monday.
NEWS
July 4, 1988
Cases of the mysterious "sudden unexpected death syndrome" among Southeast Asian refugees have declined in most areas of the United States, but not in the San Joaquin Valley. Nationwide, 117 seemingly healthy men and one woman have died without warning since the first case was reported in 1981. The cases peaked nationwide in 1982--except in the San Joaquin Valley, where many Southeast Asians have moved to be with relatives.
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