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Sudormed Inc

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BUSINESS
January 7, 1998 | Dow Jones
Pacific Biometrics Inc. said it has acquired the rights to Sudormed Inc.'s skin patch technology for $3 million. Pacific Biometrics said Tuesday that it will pay Sudormed over a 15-month period. Under the agreement, Pacific Biometrics also agreed to make an ongoing royalty payment based on the sales of products developed from the technology. Pacific Biometrics said the license agreement also allows for all other potential applications, except for those relating to alcohol and drug abuse.
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BUSINESS
January 7, 1998 | Dow Jones
Pacific Biometrics Inc. said it has acquired the rights to Sudormed Inc.'s skin patch technology for $3 million. Pacific Biometrics said Tuesday that it will pay Sudormed over a 15-month period. Under the agreement, Pacific Biometrics also agreed to make an ongoing royalty payment based on the sales of products developed from the technology. Pacific Biometrics said the license agreement also allows for all other potential applications, except for those relating to alcohol and drug abuse.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
PharmChem Laboratories Inc. of Menlo Park, Calif., said Tuesday that it has signed an exclusive license and supply agreement with Sudormed Inc. in Santa Ana, which has created a "drug detection patch" that collects perspiration from the wearer's body to be analyzed for traces of chemicals, such as alcohol and illegal drugs. Sudormed, a small, privately held company created three years ago, already has won permission from the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
PharmChem Laboratories Inc. of Menlo Park, Calif., said Tuesday that it has signed an exclusive license and supply agreement with Sudormed Inc. in Santa Ana, which has created a "drug detection patch" that collects perspiration from the wearer's body to be analyzed for traces of chemicals, such as alcohol and illegal drugs. Sudormed, a small, privately held company created three years ago, already has won permission from the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1996 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drug offenders soon may be sweating out the results of their drug tests--literally. A new skin patch, recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, detects the use of cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, marijuana and PCP through sweat. Worn for up to 14 days, it is then sent to a lab for testing. Orange County's Probation Department plans to begin using the "sweat patch" on a limited basis within a few weeks, said department spokesman Rod Speer.
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