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Sue Coe

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1991 | SUVAN GEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's impossible to look at Sue Coe's graphic black-and-white images in the "Porkopolis" series and not feel her passion. Feelings about the slaughter of animals for food aside, the images are powerful. The composition, lighting and drawing are all stirring and recall the bold, emotional force of Kathe Kollwitz, the kaleidoscopic disillusionment of George Grosz and the nightmare visions of Francisco Goya.
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NEWS
April 1, 2001 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A prominent critic once called British-born artist Sue Coe "the greatest living practitioner of confrontational, revolutionary art." Coe, 50, creates artwork that isn't easily forgotten. That's her goal. She's spent decades depicting cruelties and foibles--not to shock but to educate, influence and, she hopes, inspire change. Her subject matter is ugly: war, rape, homelessness, hunger, AIDS, apartheid and animal abuse. But her images often are hauntingly beautiful.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to The Times
Ask British artist Sue Coe questions about her technique or the critical analysis her work has received from the art world and she dismisses them with a wave of her hand. "I couldn't care less about whether people call my work cartooning, drawing, painting or whatever," she declares. "I don't read art magazines and have no interest in painterly issues. My work is an opportunity to present information."
BOOKS
March 31, 1996 | Susan Reynolds
DEAD MEAT by Sue Coe, with an essay by Alexander Cockburn (Four Walls Eight Windows: $40; 136 pp.). For six years, writer-illustrator Sue Coe carried her sketchbook into meatpacking plants across the country. No easy task, for as she writes in her acknowledgments, "slaughterhouses, especially the larger ones, are guarded like military compounds."
BOOKS
March 31, 1996 | Susan Reynolds
DEAD MEAT by Sue Coe, with an essay by Alexander Cockburn (Four Walls Eight Windows: $40; 136 pp.). For six years, writer-illustrator Sue Coe carried her sketchbook into meatpacking plants across the country. No easy task, for as she writes in her acknowledgments, "slaughterhouses, especially the larger ones, are guarded like military compounds."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991
In response to the letters Aug. 18 about artist Sue Coe, here's an exciting new theory that may persuade more people to become vegetarians: Apparently there is an enzyme in meat that renders carnivores incredibly thin-skinned and touchy. Said enzyme leads consumers of dead animal flesh so far from reality that in a culture dominated by fast-food hamburgers and TV commercials for bloody prime rib, they feel that vegetarianism is being shoved down their throats. Telltale signs include self-righteous arguments such as "one of the most famous vegetarians was Adolf Hitler."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1991
Regarding "Slaughter of the Soul," Kristine McKenna's profile of artist Sue Coe (Aug. 4): Coe bravely crossed the threshold of hell to depict what devastation is wreaked upon our fellow critters in the slaughterhouses. She rightly quoted Dante, who said: "The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who in times of great moral crises maintain their neutrality." Dante's Inferno was an allegory; Coe witnessed a true inferno. There are unlimited alternatives to the ghastly habit of meat eating, a cornucopia of health-giving fruits, grains, seeds and vegetables to rival the Garden of Eden.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A prominent critic once called British-born artist Sue Coe "the greatest living practitioner of confrontational, revolutionary art." Coe, 50, creates artwork that isn't easily forgotten. That's her goal. She's spent decades depicting cruelties and foibles--not to shock but to educate, influence and, she hopes, inspire change. Her subject matter is ugly: war, rape, homelessness, hunger, AIDS, apartheid and animal abuse. But her images often are hauntingly beautiful.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS
If you are Tracy Chapman, you can write songs about injustice and millions will hear them. But if you are an artist who wants people to understand the evils perpetrated by police states or racism in America, you run into a number of problems. Not the least of them is the art world's fondness for fancy theoretical principles and its distaste for the wearisome stridence of the activist message.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991
In response to the letters Aug. 18 about artist Sue Coe, here's an exciting new theory that may persuade more people to become vegetarians: Apparently there is an enzyme in meat that renders carnivores incredibly thin-skinned and touchy. Said enzyme leads consumers of dead animal flesh so far from reality that in a culture dominated by fast-food hamburgers and TV commercials for bloody prime rib, they feel that vegetarianism is being shoved down their throats. Telltale signs include self-righteous arguments such as "one of the most famous vegetarians was Adolf Hitler."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1991
With Coe espousing the morality of vegetarians, and the way people worship their pets nowadays, I think I can safely say I would rather be a dog. Maybe then I could eat a few scraps of beef in peace without activists shoving their choice down my throat. RACHEL WALKER Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1991 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to The Times
Ask British artist Sue Coe questions about her technique or the critical analysis her work has received from the art world and she dismisses them with a wave of her hand. "I couldn't care less about whether people call my work cartooning, drawing, painting or whatever," she declares. "I don't read art magazines and have no interest in painterly issues. My work is an opportunity to present information."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1991 | SUVAN GEER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's impossible to look at Sue Coe's graphic black-and-white images in the "Porkopolis" series and not feel her passion. Feelings about the slaughter of animals for food aside, the images are powerful. The composition, lighting and drawing are all stirring and recall the bold, emotional force of Kathe Kollwitz, the kaleidoscopic disillusionment of George Grosz and the nightmare visions of Francisco Goya.
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