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Sue Kirby

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NEWS
January 31, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is--Sue Kirby is certain of it--a secret camp where men go to learn those "sure-fire" male responses to the women in their lives. How else do you explain the similarity of reactions to situations such as when a wife comes home with a new purchase and all her mate can utter is: "How much was it?" Or how about when, after an especially hectic day of work and household chores, a woman prepares a hearty soup and salad for dinner and the man in her life counters with: "Is this it?"
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NEWS
November 28, 1995 | BRAD BONHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sue Kirby, 55, sums up the years she spent as a duty-bound Lake Forest housewife with one comically absurd memory: that of raking the shag carpet. * Her philosophy now, which colors her speeches at service club meetings, church functions and employee workshops, is to celebrate the ordinary. Put humor first. Laugh at the often frustrating differences between men and women. Get your teen-agers' attention by acting crazier than they do.
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NEWS
November 28, 1995 | BRAD BONHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sue Kirby, 55, sums up the years she spent as a duty-bound Lake Forest housewife with one comically absurd memory: that of raking the shag carpet. * Her philosophy now, which colors her speeches at service club meetings, church functions and employee workshops, is to celebrate the ordinary. Put humor first. Laugh at the often frustrating differences between men and women. Get your teen-agers' attention by acting crazier than they do.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is--Sue Kirby is certain of it--a secret camp where men go to learn those "sure-fire" male responses to the women in their lives. How else do you explain the similarity of reactions to situations such as when a wife comes home with a new purchase and all her mate can utter is: "How much was it?" Or how about when, after an especially hectic day of work and household chores, a woman prepares a hearty soup and salad for dinner and the man in her life counters with: "Is this it?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER
For more than 20 years, the Assistance League of Capistrano Valley has provided new clothing to about 500 needy children in kindergarten through the sixth grade. Operation School Bell's spring clothing drive begins Monday and continues through March. Donations can be dropped off at 528 N. El Camino Real. The league also will hold a luncheon Feb. 24 featuring author Sue Kirby, whose book "Men's Secret Camp--Timeless Tribulations of Family Life and Love" will be discussed.
NEWS
May 14, 1993 | ROSE APODACA
Think about mothers and daughters bonding, and shopping together usually comes to mind. About 18 teen-age patients of Children's Hospital of Orange County, their sisters and moms spent an afternoon doing just that at Charlotte Russe in South Coast Plaza, Costa Mesa, recently. The time spent looking at racks of trendy outfits and camping out in the dressing rooms served as a break from the hospital rooms where these teens with chronic illnesses have spent too much of their young lives.
HOME & GARDEN
June 12, 1993
Herb Fair '93, a celebration of the world of herbs, takes place at the Fullerton Arboretum from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and tomorrow. Herb lovers can stroll among booths offering an assortment of herbs and herb-related products, sip herbal teas, nosh on herb-accented salads and main courses and catch up on herbal lore from a variety of expert speakers. Sharon Lovejoy, author of "Sunflower Houses" (Interweave Press), will speak on children's gardens.
HOME & GARDEN
November 23, 1991 | DIANA O'BRIEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dried and living herbs of all colors, shapes and smells add ambience to your home. Organic decorator and author Sue Kirby says the lavender, mauve, soft green and blue colors of herbs are infinitely preferable to dyed artificial products. "These are real colors, real fragrances, real products," says Kirby, who has been decorating with herbs for 10 years. "The minute I found sage, rosemary and spearmint, I began using them all the time."
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | PAMELA MARIN
Fir Fest Local fund-raiser Sylvia Burnett pulled together her first "Christmas Tree Magic" benefit Sunday at the Four Seasons Hotel in Newport Beach. The luncheon--which Burnett hopes will be an annual event--drew 225 guests at $55 each, raising an estimated $15,000 for Olive Crest treatment centers for abused children. Decking the hotel's cushy halls were seven corporate-sponsored, professionally decorated noble fir trees, which were auctioned off after lunch.
HOME & GARDEN
October 31, 1992 | KATHY BRYANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
History and tradition were in lavish display at the recent marriage of Jeanne Moriarty and Larry Williams. As members of Orange County's oldest families--hers dates from 1911, his from 1902--they wanted an Old California wedding replete with a bounty of flowers. "Rancho Capistrano, where the wedding was held, feels like our own house," Moriarty said. "It's very tranquil and comfortable. It gives you the feeling that anyone who's been married there will stay married."
HOME & GARDEN
May 4, 1991 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last Christmas, Jean Moriarty gave herself a grand present--a new home wrapped in Yuletide adornment. There were stair rails laced with gold beads, china cabinets topped with silk burgundy roses and mantles draped with cedar boughs. "It looked like the Ritz-Carlton in here," she said. When the festive frills went into storage, Moriarty's spacious Mission Viejo home suddenly seemed a bit lackluster. "I thought, there's no reason to celebrate life only during the holidays," Moriarty said.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You're about to leave for a party in a casual but elegant outfit--a testimony to your sophistication and good taste. Then your husband, whose total lack of style is often mistaken for eccentricity, appears in what you not-so-affectionately call his "uniform"--the same khaki slacks and checkered shirt he's had on for the past five days. You say: 1) "Oh my God, you're not wearing that again!" 2) "Why don't we just go to a movie?" 3) "Nice outfit. It's so . . . predictable."
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