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Sue Mengers

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By David Ng
The recent Los Angeles run of "I'll Eat You Last," starring Bette Midler as the late talent agent Sue Mengers, drew a fair number of Hollywood stars to the Geffen Playhouse -- some of whom actually knew Mengers during her heyday in the '70s as a Tinseltown power broker. Among the most notable faces in the Geffen audience was Barbra Streisand, who was one of Mengers' most important clients and is a key point of reference in the play. Streisand attended a recent performance of "I'll Eat You Last" with her husband, James Brolin, according to the actress-singer's publicist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Robert Minervini paints landscapes of disappointment, shot through with irrepressible promise. Structures are half-built, either rising or abandoned. The blank stares of empty billboards advertise a kind of existential vacancy, while twining vines spread new life. In his recent work at Marine Contemporary (the gallery's final show in its current location), the San Francisco-based painter straddles the dystopian and utopian, invoking a built environment that encompasses simultaneity and contradiction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By David Ng
The late Hollywood talent agent Sue Mengers will rise again in Los Angeles when Bette Midler reprises her recent Broadway starring role in "I'll Eat You Last" at the Geffen Playhouse. The production is scheduled to run for three weeks at the Geffen with an opening set for Dec. 5. "I'll Eat You Last: A Chat with Sue Mengers," written by the prolific John Logan, is a solo show in which Midler incarnates the colorful Hollywood agent as she holds court in her Beverly Hills home. Mengers, who died in 2011, was an agent to some of the biggest movie stars of the 1970s, including Barbra Streisand, Steve McQueen, Ali MacGraw and Faye Dunaway.  The play opened at the Booth Theatre in New York in late April and ran for two months.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Digital technology has largely dematerialized photography for the general public. Pictures are now shown and exchanged more on screen than hand-to-hand. The work of a growing number of artists counters this trend and re materializes the medium, emphasizing the photograph's identity not just as an image carrier, a vehicle, but as an object. Artists in the late '60s, responding to a different set of stimuli, were among the first to actively exploit the sculptural possibilities of photography (Cherry and Martin held a great show on this subject last year)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1993 | By Elaine Dutka, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Sue Mengers once called herself an "aggressive, smart piece of manpower. " Smart and flamboyant, charming and abrasive, she was "one of the boys" in the freewheeling Hollywood of the '70s. She was a star in her own right: probably the only agent profiled on "60 Minutes," and the inspiration for the acid-tongued blonde portrayed by Dyan Cannon in the 1973 whodunit "The Last of Sheila. " With a client list that included directors Sidney Lumet and Brian De Palma, actors Faye Dunaway and Michael Caine, Mengers became the industry's first female superagent.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
With “Parental Guidance” a surprise hit, Bette Midler is doubling down on her show-biz comeback. The actress will return to Broadway this spring for the first time in three decades. And she's doing it with a Hollywood spin, starring as legendary agent Sue Mengers in a new one-woman play titled “I'll Eat You Last.” Screenwriter-playwright John Logan (“Skyfall”) wrote the show about the agent, who died in 2011. Mengers was one of the first of the Hollywood superagents, pioneering a role for women in Hollywood; she had in fact represented many of Midler's contemporaries, including Barbra Streisand, Burt Reynolds and Faye Dunaway.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
I never had dinner at Sue Mengers' house, and though I had a nodding acquaintance with her completely charming husband, director Jean-Claude Tramont, I never even met the woman in question. But after seeing John Logan's "I"ll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers," a bracing play about the woman who in her prime was viewed as the most powerful talent agent in the world, I wish I had. And, judging from the reaction on opening night at the Geffen Playhouse, a lot of other people shared that wish.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
A Hollywood striver in the 1970s would have learned oodles from Sue Mengers - how to woo a client, sass a studio exec, host a dinner party, smoke a joint. And, had she pulled up a seat in Mengers' Beverly Hills living room one particularly gloomy day in the agent's career in 1981, she would have learned how it feels when the town's warm winds suddenly blow cold. That's the point when we meet Mengers in "I'll Eat You Last," a one-woman show opening Wednesday on Broadway. The eagerly anticipated production stars Bette Midler as Mengers, the onetime rep for stars such as Barbra Streisand, Candice Bergen, Michael Caine, Faye Dunaway, Gene Hackman, Ali MacGraw, Burt Reynolds and Nick Nolte.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Sue Mengers, an unapologetically brash talent agent who blazed a path for women in Hollywood and represented some of its biggest stars, died Saturday night at her Beverly Hills home after a long illness. She was 79. For two decades, Mengers was one of the entertainment industry's most powerful agents, rising fast in a business dominated by men. She earned a reputation as a skilled negotiator who was both tough and uncensored in her style. She had a knack for putting together packages of talent, including authors, directors and stars, that produced box office blockbusters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1987 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
Some junior and senior editors were sitting around an apostrophe-shaped table at a major publishing house, picking brains. The idea was to find the quintessential Hollywood book of the '70s, combining business and glamour and stardom. A coffee-table book, maybe, with photos from private lives. Or perhaps an oral history? Or simply a guide to power? Inevitably a bright young editor said the name "Sue Mengers." And the room stopped cold. "Sue Mengers!" shrieked one of the others.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
The further you delve into the Lora Schlesinger Gallery, the better Mark Stock's show gets. What greets you up front might discourage deeper exploration. The centerpieces of "Hollywood: Uncovered" are bland encaustic paintings of individual letters of the famous hillside sign with photographs of vintage celebrities and news items embedded in the waxy mix. The landscape backgrounds are mostly generic afterthoughts and the works feel just a notch above kitschy souvenirs. Further back in the gallery are a few large, competently painted narrative tableaux.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Signing a liability waiver and putting on disposable shoe covers are requisite preliminaries to viewing Wolf Vostell's installation at the Box. They act as a kind of spectator foreplay, setting the mood for something risky, visceral, vulnerable. Even if we don't quite know what, something is clearly at stake here. Booties on and future claims waived, visitors enter a large room through a chain-link gate. The enclosure is a cage and also a graveyard of sorts. Roughly 40 old, boxy television sets are aligned in a loose maze.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By David Ng
The recent Los Angeles run of "I'll Eat You Last," starring Bette Midler as the late talent agent Sue Mengers, drew a fair number of Hollywood stars to the Geffen Playhouse -- some of whom actually knew Mengers during her heyday in the '70s as a Tinseltown power broker. Among the most notable faces in the Geffen audience was Barbra Streisand, who was one of Mengers' most important clients and is a key point of reference in the play. Streisand attended a recent performance of "I'll Eat You Last" with her husband, James Brolin, according to the actress-singer's publicist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
I never had dinner at Sue Mengers' house, and though I had a nodding acquaintance with her completely charming husband, director Jean-Claude Tramont, I never even met the woman in question. But after seeing John Logan's "I"ll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers," a bracing play about the woman who in her prime was viewed as the most powerful talent agent in the world, I wish I had. And, judging from the reaction on opening night at the Geffen Playhouse, a lot of other people shared that wish.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Susan King
The 29th Santa Barbara International Film Festival announced Tuesday that Robert Redford will receive the American Riviera Award at a tribute Feb. 7 at the Arlington Theatre. The festival takes place Jan. 30 through Feb. 9. Redford, 77, has starred in such classic films as 1969's "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," 1973's "The Sting" and "The Way We Were" and won a best director Oscar for his debut feature as a filmmaker, 1980's "Ordinary People. " Redford also changed the landscape of independent cinema, establishing Sundance Institute and the Sundance Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Tea time at Sardi's, and in rushed Bette Midler too busy to give her caricature on the far wall an admiring glance. She had just finished taping an appearance on Katie Couric's talk show and, like me, had plans to see Mike Nichols' starry production of "Betrayal" later that evening. (Unlike me, her companion was Glenn Close.) In short, it was a typical run, run, run New York day. For the moment, however, Midler's attention was focused on "a creature of Beverly Hills," the late Hollywood super-agent Sue Mengers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Enthroned on her couch in Beverly Hills, Hollywood superagent Sue Mengers did not go gentle into that good night but, instead, gossiped and tattled against the dying of the light. Well, she's back holding court in her modest (by neighborhood standards, anyway) palace, which has been relocated to Broadway's Booth Theatre. Here Bette Midler, draped in a turquoise caftan like a sedentary 1980s queen too tired even for browsing on Rodeo Drive, delivers Mengers' ribald wit and agentry wisdom in John Logan's "I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Tea time at Sardi's, and in rushed Bette Midler too busy to give her caricature on the far wall an admiring glance. She had just finished taping an appearance on Katie Couric's talk show and, like me, had plans to see Mike Nichols' starry production of "Betrayal" later that evening. (Unlike me, her companion was Glenn Close.) In short, it was a typical run, run, run New York day. For the moment, however, Midler's attention was focused on "a creature of Beverly Hills," the late Hollywood super-agent Sue Mengers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2013 | Matt Cooper
"Peter and the Starcatcher" alights at the Ahmanson, Bette Midler portrays super-agent Sue Mengers, and Brian Dennehy is "The Steward of Christendom. " Plus, a stocking stuffed full of seasonally -themed shows. Celebrating the Holidays with The Lion King Cast members from the hit musical perform seasonal favorites in this benefit show. Catalina Bar & Grill, 6725 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood. Mon., 8:30 p.m. $35, $50. (323) 466-2210. City of Light Concert reading of this Paris-set romantic-comedy musical.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Want to see Bette Midler's upcoming run at the Geffen Playhouse in her one-woman show, “I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers?” It'll cost you. The best tickets for the 19-performance stand Dec. 3-21 were going for $397 on the Geffen's ticketing Web page Friday afternoon. Add a $9 "Internet convenience fee” and a $2 “facility fee,” and you've exceeded the magic $400 per ticket mark that has prevailed for more than a decade for the best seats to the hottest shows on Broadway in New York, but never had been breached, to our knowledge, for a regular performance in L.A. But it's Broadway wherever the Divine Miss M goes, one might say. The cheapest tickets to the John Logan play in which Midler stars as the late Hollywood agent Mengers, were priced at $87, not counting fees.
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