Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSue Miller
IN THE NEWS

Sue Miller

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2010 | By Julia M. Klein
An elegant precision informs Sue Miller's fiction, a craft that serves as container and counterpoint to the messy lives and relationships at the core of her work. Miller's ninth novel, "The Lake Shore Limited," belongs to the burgeoning genre of Sept. 11 literature: books that share an interest in grief and social dislocation. But the backdrop here isn't simply one colossal day of destruction. Miller's baby-boomer characters have traversed a long arc of disappointment, from the youthful idealism of the 1970s to the compromises of middle age. Instead of politics itself, Miller has taken as her subject the politics of relationships and the human-scale disasters that flawed men and women inflict on one another.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2010
The Lake Shore Limited A Novel Sue Miller Alfred A. Knopf: 278 pp., $25.95
Advertisement
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sue Miller is an anatomist of love in all its guises, exploring the myriad emotional connections between husbands and wives, parents and children, siblings and friends. * In her third novel, the scope and depth of her concern is broader and deeper than in "The Good Mother" or "Family Pictures": a logical artistic progression from the particular to the general. Holding the multiple strands of this subtly braided novel is Lottie Reed, visiting her hometown of Cambridge, Mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2005 | Mai Tran, Times Staff Writer
A woman found dead inside a stolen car after a weekend police shootout in Colorado was identified Tuesday as a 39-year-old Riverside resident who was wanted for questioning in the disappearance of her former Orange County landlady, officials said. The woman, Deborah Sue Miller Vovos, was shot in the upper torso, said Jim Amormino, spokesman for the Orange County Sheriff's Department.
BOOKS
May 7, 1995 | Roxana Robinson, Roxana Robinson is the author of "Georgia O'Keeffe: A Life" and the short story collection "A Glimpse of Scarlet."
There is a certain kind of knowledge that we reach only through a certain kind of fiction: fiction so rich, so thoughtful, so absorbing that reading it is like experiencing the passage in our own lives. When we reach the end of these books we think: Yes. That is how it must have been. Sue Miller writes this sort of fiction. Her brilliant, heart-rending first novel, "The Good Mother," opposed the forces of motherhood, sexuality and society in a story as complex and inexorable as a Greek tragedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991
What's the difference between an upstanding business such as "Sue" Miller and his "The Price Is Fright Christmas Trees" and Cicero Farms at Pierce College? "Sue" Miller gainfully employs lawyers to sue property owners who lease land to Christmas tree vendors without allowing his company to offer a competitive bid on the property. Cicero Farms gainfully employed people who created lasting memories for those who used the farm. Families, teachers who took their students on field trips to Cicero Farms by the thousands, and the little ones themselves enjoyed an event they will fondly remember the rest of their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1988
I too was enraged by "The Good Mother" and the disservice it does to not only women but children and families. I suspect that no one involved with the film--author Sue Miller, screenwriter Bortman, director Nimoy or actress Keaton--has actually raised a child. If they had, they could not have been associated with such a ludicrous premise as the film puts forth. No parent, for example, escapes the occasional interruption of lovemaking by a wakeful child but few, if any, children are aware of the fact.
BOOKS
October 28, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE WORLD BELOW, By Sue Miller, Alfred A. Knopf: 276 pp., $25 Readers raised in the less-is-better school of what we used to call "New Yorker fiction" have a certain a certain peculiar willfulness. They are used to making leaps, given a metaphor and a detail or two. No proselytizing, no moralizing, no exhausting adjectives and no long sentences, thank you.
NEWS
July 22, 1995
Sue Miller Fleishman, 76, nationally published travel writer who wrote about Tahiti and the rest of the South Pacific, Europe and Africa. Her articles appeared in several magazines and the Los Angeles Times. During World War II, Mrs. Fleishman hosted a radio talk show and during the 1950s she co-produced a pilot for a children's version of the television show "What's My Line." She also wrote commercials. On Sunday in Beverly Hills of complications of Alzheimer's disease.
BOOKS
May 3, 1987 | Gary Dretzka
Early in the title piece of this perceptive collection of stories, Sue Miller neatly conjures up a nostalgic vision of small-town America, then just as quickly breaks the spell: "The Abbotts' house was on the main street in town, down four or five blocks from where the commercial section began, in an area of wide lawns and overarching elms. Now all those trees have been cut down because of Dutch elm disease, and the area has an exposed, befuddled air."
BOOKS
April 24, 2005 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short-story collection "Stealing the Fire."
Ordinary life shattered, pain endured, relationships reshaped. When she is on target, no one does it better than Sue Miller, master of the quotidian, who in a story collection and five novels (including "The Good Mother" in 1986 and "While I Was Gone," an "Oprah" pick in 2000) has explored the sexual currents and domestic complications of our times. In her gripping and surprising new novel, Miller is at the top of her game.
BOOKS
October 28, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE WORLD BELOW, By Sue Miller, Alfred A. Knopf: 276 pp., $25 Readers raised in the less-is-better school of what we used to call "New Yorker fiction" have a certain a certain peculiar willfulness. They are used to making leaps, given a metaphor and a detail or two. No proselytizing, no moralizing, no exhausting adjectives and no long sentences, thank you.
NEWS
February 23, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jo Becker, the narrator of Sue Miller's sixth novel, is a veterinarian in a small Massachusetts town. Her husband, Daniel, is a minister. They have a happy marriage, three grown daughters, many friends, several pets. Jo's voice is an easy one to identify with, scrupulous, intelligent yet full of feeling.
NEWS
July 22, 1995
Sue Miller Fleishman, 76, nationally published travel writer who wrote about Tahiti and the rest of the South Pacific, Europe and Africa. Her articles appeared in several magazines and the Los Angeles Times. During World War II, Mrs. Fleishman hosted a radio talk show and during the 1950s she co-produced a pilot for a children's version of the television show "What's My Line." She also wrote commercials. On Sunday in Beverly Hills of complications of Alzheimer's disease.
BOOKS
May 7, 1995 | Roxana Robinson, Roxana Robinson is the author of "Georgia O'Keeffe: A Life" and the short story collection "A Glimpse of Scarlet."
There is a certain kind of knowledge that we reach only through a certain kind of fiction: fiction so rich, so thoughtful, so absorbing that reading it is like experiencing the passage in our own lives. When we reach the end of these books we think: Yes. That is how it must have been. Sue Miller writes this sort of fiction. Her brilliant, heart-rending first novel, "The Good Mother," opposed the forces of motherhood, sexuality and society in a story as complex and inexorable as a Greek tragedy.
NEWS
May 13, 1993 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no appearance on "Larry King Live," calculated to sell a zillion books. Last week, when novelist Sue Miller came to Los Angeles to promote her new book, "For Love," she took time out from the usual round of bookstore signings to attend a meeting of a 14-year-old book club in a Santa Monica living room. In fact, the event didn't result in the sale of a single copy of "For Love."
NEWS
May 13, 1993 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no appearance on "Larry King Live," calculated to sell a zillion books. Last week, when novelist Sue Miller came to Los Angeles to promote her new book, "For Love," she took time out from the usual round of bookstore signings to attend a meeting of a 14-year-old book club in a Santa Monica living room. In fact, the event didn't result in the sale of a single copy of "For Love."
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sue Miller is an anatomist of love in all its guises, exploring the myriad emotional connections between husbands and wives, parents and children, siblings and friends. * In her third novel, the scope and depth of her concern is broader and deeper than in "The Good Mother" or "Family Pictures": a logical artistic progression from the particular to the general. Holding the multiple strands of this subtly braided novel is Lottie Reed, visiting her hometown of Cambridge, Mass.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|