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Sue Thomas

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NEWS
October 10, 2002 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Working for the FBI, Sue Thomas was something of an anomaly. She could stand across an airport lobby while an illicit deal was going down and take verbatim note of what suspects were saying. Or, perched on a roof with a pair of field glasses, she could peer into a building across the way and read the lips of anyone she watched. Although her first FBI job involved analyzing fingerprints in Washington, D.C.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
A trust representing creditors of Refco Inc. has sued the private equity firm that held a controlling stake in the commodities firm brought down in a 2005 scandal. The lawsuit against buyout firm Thomas H. Lee Partners was filed in U.S. District Court in New York. The complaint alleges that Lee uncovered red flags about Refco before the investment firm's 2004 purchase of a stake in the company, once one of the world's largest commodities and derivatives firms.
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BOOKS
June 5, 1994 | ERIKA TAYLOR
WATER by Sue Thomas. (Overlook: $21.95; 235 pp.) "Meeting the wrong man is like stepping into the waves of an ebb tide--you feel the pull of the water beneath your feet and you're drawn to follow it. You know, of course, that when the tide turns you'll glance around to find yourself way out of your depth." So says Sue Thomas in "Water," a desolate, dreamy novel that is pulled along by the thread of emotion rather than the thread of story.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Television stereotypes everyone and everything. So why should it be different for disabilities? Amputees have gotten a bad rap; for example, witness the notorious one-armed slayer of Dr. Richard Kimble's wife on "The Fugitive." And just as ultra-sensory perception or "smellavision" defined blind characters, bitterness for years was the prevalent distortion attached to those in wheelchairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Television stereotypes everyone and everything. So why should it be different for disabilities? Amputees have gotten a bad rap; for example, witness the notorious one-armed slayer of Dr. Richard Kimble's wife on "The Fugitive." And just as ultra-sensory perception or "smellavision" defined blind characters, bitterness for years was the prevalent distortion attached to those in wheelchairs.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
A trust representing creditors of Refco Inc. has sued the private equity firm that held a controlling stake in the commodities firm brought down in a 2005 scandal. The lawsuit against buyout firm Thomas H. Lee Partners was filed in U.S. District Court in New York. The complaint alleges that Lee uncovered red flags about Refco before the investment firm's 2004 purchase of a stake in the company, once one of the world's largest commodities and derivatives firms.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2003 | From Associated Press
Television's most popular program, "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," is also its least family-friendly, a TV watchdog group said Thursday. The Parents Television Council criticized the CBS drama for stories about cannibalism, S&M sex clubs and "snuff" films. What's worse is that CBS occasionally reruns the show at the 8 p.m. hour when more children are likely to be watching, said Melissa Caldwell, research director for the 800,000-member organization that monitors sex and violence on TV.
SPORTS
November 22, 1986 | LISA DILLMAN
Tennis player Andrea Holikova of Czechoslovakia has applied for political asylum in the United States, a spokesman for the Minnesota North Stars hockey club said Friday. "She filed for it (Thursday) after meeting with the INS (Immigration and Naturalization Service) in St. Paul," said Sue Thomas, an assistant to North Star General Manager Lou Nanne. The North Stars had helped Holikova's boyfriend, defenseman Frantisek Musil, defect from Czechoslovakia in July.
SPORTS
April 8, 1989 | BOB WOLF, Special to the Times
There are many contenders at the halfway point of the LPGA tour's Red Robin Kyocera Inamori tournament at StoneRidge, but defending champion Ayako Okamoto isn't one of them. In fact, Okamoto is no longer in the tournament. After winning here twice in a row, the Japanese veteran bowed out Friday when she added a nine-over-par 80 to her first-round 75 and missed the cut by eight strokes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1992 | PATRICK McCARTNEY
A Simi Valley manufacturer of industrial cable has laid off a third of its work force, prompting a councilwoman to warn that the city must do more to hold on to its job base. Whittaker Electronic Resources, a division of Torrance-based Whittaker Corp., gave pink slips this week to 40 of the 125 workers it employs at its Surveyor Avenue plant, a company official said Friday. No additional layoffs are planned, said Ross Roads, a vice president of the Simi Valley firm.
NEWS
October 10, 2002 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Working for the FBI, Sue Thomas was something of an anomaly. She could stand across an airport lobby while an illicit deal was going down and take verbatim note of what suspects were saying. Or, perched on a roof with a pair of field glasses, she could peer into a building across the way and read the lips of anyone she watched. Although her first FBI job involved analyzing fingerprints in Washington, D.C.
BOOKS
June 5, 1994 | ERIKA TAYLOR
WATER by Sue Thomas. (Overlook: $21.95; 235 pp.) "Meeting the wrong man is like stepping into the waves of an ebb tide--you feel the pull of the water beneath your feet and you're drawn to follow it. You know, of course, that when the tide turns you'll glance around to find yourself way out of your depth." So says Sue Thomas in "Water," a desolate, dreamy novel that is pulled along by the thread of emotion rather than the thread of story.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1987 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
In a pair of multimillion-dollar foreclosure sales Tuesday, two Newport Beach properties were returned to lenders after a public auction failed to produce any bidders. One property is the nine-bedroom Harbor Island home that the late Duayne D. Christensen bought for $5.2 million. Christensen and Janet F. McKinzie, his confidante and business manager, have been accused in a lawsuit of illegally siphoning $20 million from his North America Savings & Loan Assn. in Santa Ana.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2007 | Lynne Heffley
The Tony-honored musical "Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," a Deaf West Theatre triumph, recognized the talents of deaf and hearing-impaired theater professionals who generally fly under the radar. This week's International Sign Language Theater Festival is intended to do the same, said CJ Jones, a deaf stage and screen actor who heads the nonprofit organization Hands Across Communications, the event's presenter.
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