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WORLD
February 2, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Abdel Ibrahim waited in the alley with an ax. Boys gathered around him with clubs and knives. His brother held a gun made of lead pipe and a trigger. Building fires smoldered and the dead had been buried, but Ibrahim's small, ragged army suggested new graves may soon be dug. There were no police officers in sight. Their headquarters had been burned. So had the fire department. In this port city of salt air and factory smoke, where resentment over President Hosni Mubarak has been ingrained over decades, the government is the enemy.
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OPINION
September 22, 2013 | By David Schenker
Most of the attention these days is on Syria, but there is also a growing problem in Egypt with global implications. Nine Egyptian policemen were wounded by a bomb in the northern Sinai Peninsula on Monday. The week before, suicide bombers killed nine soldiers in the peninsula. Shootings, kidnappings and bombings - roadside, car and suicide - have become routine occurrences in Sinai. And the burgeoning Islamist insurgency is spreading to other parts of Egypt. In early September, the interior minister narrowly survived a car-bomb attack in Cairo reportedly perpetrated by a Sinai-based jihadist group.
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TRAVEL
December 20, 1987 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY, Beyer and Rabey are Los Angeles travel writers .
Whatever Rudyard Kipling had to say on the subject in his poem, he never made it to this city and probably never even got very far on the road. His Burma girl was a-settin' by a pagoda in Moulmein, almost 500 miles south, and by all accounts he came only as far as Rangoon. No matter, many have shared his romantic notion to be shipped "somewhere east of Suez, where the best is like the worst."
WORLD
August 22, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - In February 2011, when Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak bowed to a popular uprising and relinquished power, President Obama welcomed the change and declared, "Egypt will never be the same. " Two and a half years after the elation of the "Arab Spring," Egypt looks much as it did under the aging autocrat, only more violently polarized. Critics say Obama has mostly watched from the sidelines. Mubarak's court-ordered release from prison Thursday in effect capped the end of Egypt's brief experiment with democracy and its return to military rule.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1985
That puts the price for Gulf of Suez grade oil at $27.50 a barrel. In addition, Egypt said it is increasing the price of its least expensive oil, Ras Ghareb, by 15 cents to $25.75 a barrel. Other prices were left unchanged. Egypt's oil minister, Abdel-Hadi Kandil, said the current level of production of 870,000 barrels a day will be maintained. Half of the oil is exported, mostly to customers in Europe.
WORLD
August 17, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman
His hair thinning and his days long, Shazly Sawy is Egypt's everyman. "I'm the oldest worker in my factory," said the 36-year-old father with a raisin-brown callus on his forehead from years of prostrating in prayer. "I make 900 pounds [$163] a month. My rent is 500 pounds. I have medical and family bills. That eats my paycheck. The only way I can survive is borrowing money from my father." Sawy led a recent strike of fertilizer workers who camped for 20 days at a factory mosque in Suez before police pressure and promises from management ended the standoff.
NEWS
December 30, 1986 | DON COOK and TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writers
Harold Macmillan, who overcame a crippling shyness and years of political obscurity to become one of the most successful British prime ministers of the post-World War II era, died Monday at age 92, his family said. Macmillan's grandson, Viscount Macmillan of Ovendon, said in a statement that his grandfather died peacefully at his home in Sussex in southern England after a short illness. Macmillan had been in poor health for some time after a bout of pneumonia. A private funeral was planned.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1985 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The French have liberty, equality and fraternity; the movies have caution, imitation and condescension. So it is that when an item or two comes along that seems daring, original and respectful of an audience's intelligence, the inclination of the steady viewer is to do a quick buck and wing on Westwood Boulevard.
NEWS
November 8, 1986 | Associated Press
The U.S. battleship Missouri traveled through the Suez Canal to the Mediterranean on Friday. The 45,000-ton recommissioned battlewagon is making its first round-the-world voyage.
NEWS
February 1, 1988 | United Press International
A freak sandstorm that reduced visibility to less than 100 yards forced authorities today to halt traffic in the Suez Canal, stranding 51 ships including four British military vessels in the waterway, officials said. Winds up to 60 m.p.h. laden with dust also forced the closure of all desert highways as well as Alexandria harbor on the Mediterranean and the diversion to other airports of at least five airliners that were scheduled to land at Cairo Airport.
WORLD
July 9, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
SUEZ, Egypt - Military lookouts keep watch over freighters in the blurry distance and checkpoints choke the streets leading into this industrial city, where garrisoned soldiers carry rifles and loaves of bread along the sea. The outdoor market has reopened and alleys bustle amid the scent of mangoes, spices and fish stacked on ice. Troops look down from armored personnel carriers; they check identification cards and open car trunks to search for...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012
Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment just released the first titles of its new Fox Cinemas Archives DVD series. Tyrone Power fans are in for a treat because three of his films are in the mix, including the 1937 romantic comedy "Love Is News" with Loretta Young, 1938's epic "Suez," which also stars Young and French actress Annabella, who Power married in 1939, and the 1952 thriller "Diplomatic Courier," with Patricia Neal. Also worth checking out is the 1943 romantic drama "Claudia," featuring Dorothy McGuire in her film debut as a child bride married to Robert Young.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Jim Newton, Los Angeles Times
Eisenhower 1956: The President's Year of Crisis ? Suez and the Brink of War. David A. Nichols Simon & Schuster: 346 pp., $28 As the Middle East has trembled in recent weeks, the Obama administration has struggled for a coherent and forceful response ? one that reconciles American interests with American values, that balances geopolitics with the moral example of democracy. For an object lesson, the administration might look to the example of Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1956 and might start by reading David A. Nichols' new book on that fateful year.
WORLD
February 2, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Abdel Ibrahim waited in the alley with an ax. Boys gathered around him with clubs and knives. His brother held a gun made of lead pipe and a trigger. Building fires smoldered and the dead had been buried, but Ibrahim's small, ragged army suggested new graves may soon be dug. There were no police officers in sight. Their headquarters had been burned. So had the fire department. In this port city of salt air and factory smoke, where resentment over President Hosni Mubarak has been ingrained over decades, the government is the enemy.
WORLD
August 17, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman
His hair thinning and his days long, Shazly Sawy is Egypt's everyman. "I'm the oldest worker in my factory," said the 36-year-old father with a raisin-brown callus on his forehead from years of prostrating in prayer. "I make 900 pounds [$163] a month. My rent is 500 pounds. I have medical and family bills. That eats my paycheck. The only way I can survive is borrowing money from my father." Sawy led a recent strike of fertilizer workers who camped for 20 days at a factory mosque in Suez before police pressure and promises from management ended the standoff.
WORLD
July 24, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Batsheva Sobelman, Sobelman is an assistant in The Times' Jerusalem Bureau. Special correspondent Amro Hassan in Cairo contributed to this report.
There's no sneaking a warship through the Suez Canal, so it's best to sail through and remain coy. Israel has done just that. At least two of its missile-class Saar 5 warships and a Dolphin submarine have sailed through the canal in recent weeks, prompting conjecture about Israel's intentions.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | Associated Press
The Suez Canal, one of Egypt's main sources of badly needed hard currency, is expected to lose 10% of its revenues this year as a result of the U.N. blockade of Iraq, an official said Sunday. Mohammed Izzat Adel, chairman of the Suez Canal authority, told the state-owned Middle East News Agency that before the embargo was imposed in August, Iraq and Kuwait accounted for the annual export of 7 million tons of oil through the canal.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | Associated Press
A dense sandstorm raged over northern Egypt on Monday, bringing shipping to a halt in the Suez Canal, forcing diversion of air traffic and cloaking Cairo in an eerie yellow haze. The storm also closed the harbor at the Mediterranean city of Alexandria and 140 miles of desert highway linking it to Cairo, the official Cairo Radio reported. Tourists viewing the Pyramids of Giza and the Sphinx snapped up souvenir Arab headgear as protection from the wind-whipped sand.
WORLD
July 10, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Egyptian authorities arrested 25 people on suspicion of plotting attacks on oil pipelines and ships in the Suez Canal, the Interior Ministry said in a statement. The group, which Egypt said had links to Al Qaeda, was made up of two dozen Egyptians and their Palestinian leader. They also had contacts with militants in the Gaza Strip, the ministry said. The group planned to use explosives rigged with cellphone-activated detonators against shipping in the busy Suez Canal, and learned about explosives from Al Qaeda militants on militant websites, a ministry statement said.
WORLD
November 21, 2008 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Fleishman is a Times staff writer.
Worried that piracy could scare ships away from the Suez Canal, Egypt on Thursday held emergency talks with nations bordering the Red Sea on how to stop brazen Somali gunmen from hijacking oil tankers and other vessels. The Cairo meeting was called amid concerns that lawlessness was disrupting sea lanes and creating panic that might force shipping companies to avoid sailing the Red Sea region.
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