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WORLD
March 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of angry mourners buried an Egyptian man who they said was killed by shots from an American cargo ship as it passed through the Suez Canal. Family and friends buried Mohammed Fouad, 27, a father of two, in Suez, the city at the Red Sea entrance to the canal. U.S. officials said American military guards aboard the ship, contracted to the U.S. Navy, fired warning shots toward approaching motorboats Monday night, and they said they had received no report of anyone being killed.
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SPORTS
November 9, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
This wasn't the way it was supposed to end for Bob Bradley's Egyptian team. In a just world, Bradley, who has given Egyptian soccer fans hope during some of the darkest days in the country's recent history, would see his Cinderella team end up in Brazil next summer with a spot in the World Cup, a tournament Egypt has played in once since 1934. Instead, Bradley's Quixotic World Cup qualifying quest figures to end in disappointment next week in the second leg of a two-match African qualifier with Ghana.
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NEWS
February 1, 1988 | United Press International
A freak sandstorm that reduced visibility to less than 100 yards forced authorities today to halt traffic in the Suez Canal, stranding 51 ships including four British military vessels in the waterway, officials said. Winds up to 60 m.p.h. laden with dust also forced the closure of all desert highways as well as Alexandria harbor on the Mediterranean and the diversion to other airports of at least five airliners that were scheduled to land at Cairo Airport.
WORLD
October 13, 2013 | By Laura King and Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO -- An American citizen detained by Egyptian authorities since late August was found hanged in his jail cell on Sunday, U.S. and Egyptian officials said. Egyptian authorities described the death as an apparent suicide. The man, identified by the U.S. Embassy as James Henry Lunn, was the second foreigner in a month to die in Egyptian custody. In September, a French man who had been living in Cairo was allegedly beaten to death by cellmates after being picked up for violating a curfew that has been in place under a government-declared state of emergency.
OPINION
September 22, 2013 | By David Schenker
Most of the attention these days is on Syria, but there is also a growing problem in Egypt with global implications. Nine Egyptian policemen were wounded by a bomb in the northern Sinai Peninsula on Monday. The week before, suicide bombers killed nine soldiers in the peninsula. Shootings, kidnappings and bombings - roadside, car and suicide - have become routine occurrences in Sinai. And the burgeoning Islamist insurgency is spreading to other parts of Egypt. In early September, the interior minister narrowly survived a car-bomb attack in Cairo reportedly perpetrated by a Sinai-based jihadist group.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | Associated Press
The Suez Canal, one of Egypt's main sources of badly needed hard currency, is expected to lose 10% of its revenues this year as a result of the U.N. blockade of Iraq, an official said Sunday. Mohammed Izzat Adel, chairman of the Suez Canal authority, told the state-owned Middle East News Agency that before the embargo was imposed in August, Iraq and Kuwait accounted for the annual export of 7 million tons of oil through the canal.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | United Press International
International shipping lines in Asia are shunning the Suez Canal route to Europe and diverting around South Africa to avoid the danger of missiles and mines in the Persian Gulf. Faced by warnings that vessels enter the war-torn gulf at their own risk, soaring insurance premiums and increased surcharges and fuel costs, shippers carrying freight between Asia and Europe are increasingly opting for the longer trip around the Cape of Good Hope.
WORLD
July 24, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Batsheva Sobelman, Sobelman is an assistant in The Times' Jerusalem Bureau. Special correspondent Amro Hassan in Cairo contributed to this report.
There's no sneaking a warship through the Suez Canal, so it's best to sail through and remain coy. Israel has done just that. At least two of its missile-class Saar 5 warships and a Dolphin submarine have sailed through the canal in recent weeks, prompting conjecture about Israel's intentions.
WORLD
February 9, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A 93,000-ton cargo ship drifted at the wrong angle inside the Suez Canal during a sandstorm and blocked transit between the Mediterranean and the Red Sea. The Hong Kong-flagged Okal King Dor was traveling north when it veered at right angles to the canal. An official said high winds were a factor. Four tugboats were sent to realign the ship. About 8% of world sea trade passes through the Suez Canal.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | United Press Internationa
The Suez Canal Authority on Monday announced increases in tolls for ships passing through the waterway and predicted a heavy decline in revenues if war erupts in the Persian Gulf. Suez Canal Authority Chairman Mohammed Ezzat Adel said that toll fees for all vessels, except dry bulk carriers, will increase by 6% in January. The increase for dry bulk carriers will be only 4% due to market slackness, Adel said.
WORLD
October 7, 2013 | By Laura King and Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO - A series of attacks against military, security and government-linked targets rattled Egypt on Monday, a day after violent street clashes on a military holiday left more than 50 people dead and at least 250 hurt. Masked assailants opened fire on a military patrol near the Suez Canal city of Ismailia, killing six soldiers including an officer, according to state media. Earlier, a powerful car bomb went off outside a security headquarters in the Sinai peninsula, killing at least two people and wounding dozens of others, Egypt's Interior Ministry said.
WORLD
October 7, 2013 | By Laura King
CAIRO - A trio of attacks against military, security and government-linked targets rattled Egypt on Monday, a day after violent street clashes on a military holiday left more than 50 people dead and at least 250 hurt. Monday's strikes, which killed nine people, prompted emergency precautions at Cairo's international airport, the semiofficial Ahram Online website reported. It said security was stepped up at airport entrances and exits, at the arrival and departure terminals, and on roads leading to the airport.
WORLD
October 4, 2013 | By Laura King and Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO - Clashes between Egyptian security forces and supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood flared Friday near Cairo's Tahrir Square and several other locales, reviving bitter animosities that have simmered in the seven weeks since the army and police killed hundreds of supporters of deposed Islamist President Mohamed Morsi. Friday's fighting, reported to have claimed at least one life, could presage larger-scale confrontations on Sunday, when Egypt's powerful military stages self-laudatory commemorations of the 40th anniversary of one of its greatest modern-day battlefield triumphs.
OPINION
September 22, 2013 | By David Schenker
Most of the attention these days is on Syria, but there is also a growing problem in Egypt with global implications. Nine Egyptian policemen were wounded by a bomb in the northern Sinai Peninsula on Monday. The week before, suicide bombers killed nine soldiers in the peninsula. Shootings, kidnappings and bombings - roadside, car and suicide - have become routine occurrences in Sinai. And the burgeoning Islamist insurgency is spreading to other parts of Egypt. In early September, the interior minister narrowly survived a car-bomb attack in Cairo reportedly perpetrated by a Sinai-based jihadist group.
WORLD
August 22, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - In February 2011, when Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak bowed to a popular uprising and relinquished power, President Obama welcomed the change and declared, "Egypt will never be the same. " Two and a half years after the elation of the "Arab Spring," Egypt looks much as it did under the aging autocrat, only more violently polarized. Critics say Obama has mostly watched from the sidelines. Mubarak's court-ordered release from prison Thursday in effect capped the end of Egypt's brief experiment with democracy and its return to military rule.
WORLD
August 15, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The brutal military crackdown on civilian protesters in Egypt has damaged President Obama's already battered prestige and credibility in the Middle East, analysts say, but the deepening crisis isn't likely to threaten America's core security interests in one of the world's most volatile regions. Egypt's powerful military leadership may be offended by Obama's decision Thursday to cancel a biennial joint military training exercise that was scheduled to start next month to show his displeasure with the rising death toll, arbitrary arrests and virtual martial law. But the generals who toppled the democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, on July 3 are not likely to suspend crucial counter-terrorism cooperation with Washington, halt oil tankers and other commercial shipping in the Suez Canal, or jettison the peace treaty with Israel that has formed a cornerstone of regional peace for three decades.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
The aircraft carrier America and four accompanying warships entered the Suez Canal on Tuesday on their way from the Persian Gulf to join the U.S. 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, a canal official said. The official identified the ships accompanying the America as the Mobile Bay, a guided missile cruiser; the Lawrence, a guided missile destroyer; the fast combat support ship Seattle, and the Joseph Hewes, a frigate.
WORLD
July 9, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
SUEZ, Egypt - Military lookouts keep watch over freighters in the blurry distance and checkpoints choke the streets leading into this industrial city, where garrisoned soldiers carry rifles and loaves of bread along the sea. The outdoor market has reopened and alleys bustle amid the scent of mangoes, spices and fish stacked on ice. Troops look down from armored personnel carriers; they check identification cards and open car trunks to search for...
WORLD
July 4, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The passions fueling Egypt's political turbulence arose directly from the "Arab Spring" of 2011, but they have deeper roots in a decades-long struggle over the nation's identity between two authoritarian forces -- Islamists and a secular military state. Egypt won its independence from Britain after a 1952 revolution by army officers led by Gamal Abdel Nasser. From the start, the military was set against the Muslim Brotherhood, a growing and at times violent underground Islamist movement.
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