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Suffrage

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2000 | Jerry Hicks
Here's a pop quiz on women's suffrage which might turn your morning coffee bitter: Which nation first gave women the right to vote? If you said the United States, you missed it by 27 years. It was New Zealand in 1893; we didn't gain such civility until 1920, when we ratified the 19th Amendment. More to make you bristle: The colony of New Jersey in 1790 granted voting rights to "all free inhabitants" but later reneged when the men realized women expected that to mean them too.
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OPINION
August 26, 2011 | By Eve Weinbaum and Rachel Roth
Today we celebrate the anniversary of female suffrage, a victory that took more than 70 years of political struggle to achieve. After women won the right to vote in 1920, socialist feminist Crystal Eastman observed that suffrage was an important first step but that what women really wanted was freedom. In an essay titled "Now We Can Begin," she laid out a plan toward this goal that is still relevant today. Eastman outlined a four-point program: economic independence for women (including freedom to choose an occupation and equal pay)
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OPINION
August 26, 2011 | By Eve Weinbaum and Rachel Roth
Today we celebrate the anniversary of female suffrage, a victory that took more than 70 years of political struggle to achieve. After women won the right to vote in 1920, socialist feminist Crystal Eastman observed that suffrage was an important first step but that what women really wanted was freedom. In an essay titled "Now We Can Begin," she laid out a plan toward this goal that is still relevant today. Eastman outlined a four-point program: economic independence for women (including freedom to choose an occupation and equal pay)
OPINION
November 2, 2010 | By Mary Walton
Leaders of the National American Woman Suffrage Assn. were thrilled when William Howard Taft agreed to address their convention in 1910, the first U.S. president to do so. They were less thrilled, though, when he proceeded to compare women to Hottentots, and not in a good way. "The theory that Hottentots or any other uneducated, altogether unintelligent class is fitted for self-government at once or to take part in government is a theory that I...
OPINION
November 2, 2010 | By Mary Walton
Leaders of the National American Woman Suffrage Assn. were thrilled when William Howard Taft agreed to address their convention in 1910, the first U.S. president to do so. They were less thrilled, though, when he proceeded to compare women to Hottentots, and not in a good way. "The theory that Hottentots or any other uneducated, altogether unintelligent class is fitted for self-government at once or to take part in government is a theory that I...
NEWS
January 14, 1987 | United Press International
Opposition parties in the Chamber of Deputies called for a constitutional amendment Tuesday to allow members of the clergy to vote. Since the 1857 constitution, priests and other members of the clergy have been prohibited from voting or wearing clerical garments outside of church functions. "The government views the church as if we were still in the last century," said a spokesman for the Mexican Unified Socialist Party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1993 | ELAINE SCARRY, Elaine Scarry is a professor of English at Harvard University and author of "The Body in Pain" (Oxford University Press, 1985).
The debate over gays in the military has led many people to worry that gay men and women lack not only military rights but civil rights as well. This is borne out by the history of military rights in this country, which is closely entwined with civil rights. To have one is to have the other; to lack one is to lack the other.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2010 | Andrew Malcolm and Ashley Powers
The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. Last week marked the 90th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution, the one that gave women the right to vote after a full century of organization, agitation and marching. On Aug. 18, 1920, the Tennessee General Assembly became the 36th state to ratify the amendment, thus making it official.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"A Woman's Crusade: Alice Paul and the Battle for the Ballot" by Mary Walton (Palgrave/Macmillan: 284 pp., $28.) Alice Paul was a warrior for women's suffrage. A Quaker from New Jersey, she went to Swarthmore, the college her maternal grandfather helped to establish. She was a social worker in New York, got her master's in sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and, on a scholarship awarded by the Society of Friends, went to England to study at a Friends center in Birmingham.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995
Redefining women's suffrage: Shannon Faulkner's one week at The Citadel. HUGH GLENN Irvine
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"A Woman's Crusade: Alice Paul and the Battle for the Ballot" by Mary Walton (Palgrave/Macmillan: 284 pp., $28.) Alice Paul was a warrior for women's suffrage. A Quaker from New Jersey, she went to Swarthmore, the college her maternal grandfather helped to establish. She was a social worker in New York, got her master's in sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and, on a scholarship awarded by the Society of Friends, went to England to study at a Friends center in Birmingham.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2010 | Andrew Malcolm and Ashley Powers
The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. Last week marked the 90th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution, the one that gave women the right to vote after a full century of organization, agitation and marching. On Aug. 18, 1920, the Tennessee General Assembly became the 36th state to ratify the amendment, thus making it official.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2010
'Their Rights and Nothing Less: Commemorating the 90th Anniversary of Women's Suffrage' Where: Heritage Square Museum, 3800 Homer St., L.A. When: 12 to 5 p.m. Fridays to Sundays through Sept. 26 Price: $10, adults; $8, seniors; $5, children ages 6 to 12; free, children younger than 6. Cost includes a tour of the museum. Contact: (323) 225-2700; http://www.heritagesquare.org
WORLD
January 2, 2010 | Times Wire Services
Thousands of Hong Kong residents marched to the Chinese government's liaison office on Friday demanding that Beijing grant full democracy to the semiautonomous financial hub. Chanting "One man, one vote to choose our leader!" and clutching signs reading "Democracy now," the demonstrators set off from a crowded street in the heart of the central financial district. Some held aloft portraits of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, demanding his release after he was sentenced last week to 11 years on subversion charges.
WORLD
December 5, 2005 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
Tens of thousands of people took to the streets in Hong Kong on Sunday to demand the right to vote for all their leaders and that the process of democratization be speeded up. Organizers estimated the turnout at 250,000, though police put the number at 63,000. Either way, the number was considered surprising, given that the former British colony's economy is on the rebound, unemployment is down and people are generally satisfied with the government.
OPINION
October 4, 2005
Re "Gov. Vetoes Same-Sex Marriage Bill," Sept. 30 The gay marriage bill would have removed redundant legislation and provided equal rights and responsibilities to all Californians. There was no reason to veto the bill: It does not interfere with any existing law; it does not mute the voice of the people, and it would have become law without the governor's interference. Schwarzenegger has joined the opponents of equality who were on the losing end of segregation, anti-Semitism and women's suffrage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1992
Suffering through months of sleazy, vote-seeking propaganda has given a new meaning to the word "suffrage." AL HIX Hollywood
OPINION
August 10, 1986
The commentary of Raymond Price was so much more of the same duplicitous logic that other conservative propagandists regurgitate to justify the continued denial of human rights by one group of human beings by another. What Price would have us believe is that the root of all revolutionary movements is power and that communism is automatically responsible, which is as far from the truth as we can get. The truth, as I know it, is that the principle of suffrage is the root cause of revolutions, just as the vacuum that is left by democracies' continued support of the status quo will surely be filled by fascism or communism.
WORLD
May 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A push to allow women to participate in Kuwait's local elections stalled when Islamist and conservative lawmakers abstained en masse from a key vote in parliament, leaving the measure undefeated but short of the number of votes needed for passage. After less than an hour of debate, 29 of the 60 lawmakers present voted for the proposal. Two legislators voted no, while 29 abstained. Thirty-three yes or no votes were required for a valid vote, so the speaker said a new vote would be required.
WORLD
April 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Kuwait's parliament gave initial approval to a measure that would allow women to vote and stand in municipal elections, a major step that has fueled hopes for wider female suffrage. The National Assembly will meet again in two weeks for a final vote. If the bill passes, the emir, widely known to support women's rights, is expected to sign it into law.
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