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Sugar Beets

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BUSINESS
February 4, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Despite a court ban, federal regulators said Friday that farmers would be able to plant genetically modified sugar beets this year ? though such plantings would have to happen under certain conditions while the government finishes up a full environmental impact statement. The news comes after estimates by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that the country's sugar supply could run short and domestic farmers could lose as much as 21% of their 2011 crop if they were unable to use the seeds this spring.
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OPINION
September 9, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Federal efforts to protect growers of sugar beets and sugar cane epitomize everything that's wrong with U.S. farm programs. At times they've artificially raised the price of sugar, costing consumers billions of dollars; at other times they've stuck taxpayers with the bill for the surplus sugar production they've promoted. The fact that the sugar program is likely to survive the latest rewrite of the farm bill unscathed is a testament to how limited the bill's "reforms" are. Sweeteners are ubiquitous in processed foods, and sugar is the most popular by far. There are two primary sources in the United States: sugar beets, which are grown in parts of California (mainly in Imperial County)
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NEWS
March 8, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California producers of rice, cotton and sugar beets appealed Thursday for federal disaster relief to offset sharply reduced plantings and yields expected this year because of record drought. Rep. Gary A. Condit (D-Merced) said at a congressional hearing that the cutbacks in cotton production alone could result in a $1-billion loss to the state's economy.
IMAGE
August 12, 2012 | By Janet Kinosian, Los Angeles Times
Not so long ago "working on a tan" meant a choice among baking in the sun, broiling on a tanning bed or slathering on a chemical-laden self-tanner that left streaks, smelled awful and imbued skin with a distinct fake orange glow. Today, there's another choice. All-natural and organic ingredients have arrived inself-tanningformulations that rely on sugar beets and various natural oils to help gradually darken the outer layer of skin. These eco-friendly products are free of many of the no-no components other all-natural skin care products avoid, such as parabens, synthetics, fragrance, colorings and dyes.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"This is a golden opportunity to secure by far the biggest and most important enterprise that has ever been offered to Ventura County, and dull indeed will be our citizens if all the conditions are not promptly and cheerfully complied with." So read the fair Ventura readers of the Free Press late in 1897. The source of such excitement? Beets. Sugar beets by the ton, which were to serve as seeds for a new era in the developing territory near the Santa Clara River outside Ventura.
IMAGE
August 12, 2012 | By Janet Kinosian, Los Angeles Times
Not so long ago "working on a tan" meant a choice among baking in the sun, broiling on a tanning bed or slathering on a chemical-laden self-tanner that left streaks, smelled awful and imbued skin with a distinct fake orange glow. Today, there's another choice. All-natural and organic ingredients have arrived inself-tanningformulations that rely on sugar beets and various natural oils to help gradually darken the outer layer of skin. These eco-friendly products are free of many of the no-no components other all-natural skin care products avoid, such as parabens, synthetics, fragrance, colorings and dyes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1995
The "dawn of prosperity," as a local newspaper called it, came to Los Alamitos in 1897, when a sugar factory opened. For nearly three decades the industry was the lifeblood of the town. Immigrant families from Europe, especially Belgium, grew sugar beets until the 1920s, when worms wiped out the crops. Source: "Early Los Alamitos," by the Los Alamitos Museum Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000
Q: Are foods sweetened with fruit juice any healthier than those sweetened with regular sugar? A: No, according to Dr. George L. Blackburn of the Harvard Medical School. "A sugar calorie is a sugar calorie, whether the sugar comes from sugar cane, sugar beets or fruit," he says. The sugar in table sugar is sucrose, while that in fruit is fructose, but both have 16 calories per teaspoon. The main differences between the two are taste and behavior during cooking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1997
No one has declared war on farmers as suggested by a Tule Lake resident (April 22). What we are fighting is government policies that have facilitated the steady degradation of one of North America's greatest wildlife areas. The national wildlife refuges in Northern California's Klamath Basin belong to all Americans. These refuges were established at the beginning of the century "as preserves and breeding grounds for native birds." While that mission was compromised long ago, there is still great potential to restore this remarkable wildlife refuge complex.
NEWS
April 11, 1985 | CARL INGRAM and LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writers
Senate President Pro Tem David A. Roberti proposed Wednesday that the harvesting of certain crops in the selenium-contaminated Kesterson area of the San Joaquin Valley be suspended until it is determined that they are safe to eat. The Los Angeles Democrat made the recommendation during a press conference he called to assail a draft of a state report on selenium concentrations that have been found in animals and selected crops in Merced and Fresno counties.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Despite a court ban, federal regulators said Friday that farmers would be able to plant genetically modified sugar beets this year ? though such plantings would have to happen under certain conditions while the government finishes up a full environmental impact statement. The news comes after estimates by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that the country's sugar supply could run short and domestic farmers could lose as much as 21% of their 2011 crop if they were unable to use the seeds this spring.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2000 | Associated Press
With the nation awash in sugar, the government is preparing to give some of the surplus to farmers who pledge to destroy some of this fall's crop. Officials at the U.S. Department of Agriculture said that's the most feasible way to prop up domestic sugar prices at the least cost to taxpayers, although a final decision has not yet been made. Critics derided the idea as a desperate attempt to bail out growers, who are partly to blame for the surplus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000
Q: Are foods sweetened with fruit juice any healthier than those sweetened with regular sugar? A: No, according to Dr. George L. Blackburn of the Harvard Medical School. "A sugar calorie is a sugar calorie, whether the sugar comes from sugar cane, sugar beets or fruit," he says. The sugar in table sugar is sucrose, while that in fruit is fructose, but both have 16 calories per teaspoon. The main differences between the two are taste and behavior during cooking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1998 | NICK GREEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A hundred years ago this month, a three-story brick factory with twin 150-foot high smokestacks stood ready for the first sugar beet crop ever taken from the Oxnard Plain. The scruffy town site of Oxnard lay half a mile away, around present-day Plaza Park, its flea-ridden roads covered with straw to fill potholes and keep the dust down. The community had been thrown together in a matter of months; a year earlier, most of Oxnard had consisted of lima bean fields.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whoops! That's how some Clinton administration political allies may have felt on Monday after President Clinton vetoed a special tax sweetener for sugar-beet farmers, only to see his action quickly sour. At first blush, the tax measure no doubt looked like a perfect candidate: Congressional calculations suggested the major beneficiary was likely to be Dallas millionaire Harold C. Simmons, a onetime corporate raider who recently sold a sugar-processing plant to a farm cooperative in Oregon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1997
No one has declared war on farmers as suggested by a Tule Lake resident (April 22). What we are fighting is government policies that have facilitated the steady degradation of one of North America's greatest wildlife areas. The national wildlife refuges in Northern California's Klamath Basin belong to all Americans. These refuges were established at the beginning of the century "as preserves and breeding grounds for native birds." While that mission was compromised long ago, there is still great potential to restore this remarkable wildlife refuge complex.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2000 | Associated Press
With the nation awash in sugar, the government is preparing to give some of the surplus to farmers who pledge to destroy some of this fall's crop. Officials at the U.S. Department of Agriculture said that's the most feasible way to prop up domestic sugar prices at the least cost to taxpayers, although a final decision has not yet been made. Critics derided the idea as a desperate attempt to bail out growers, who are partly to blame for the surplus.
FOOD
October 17, 1985 | DANIEL P. PUZO, Times Staff Writer
In a dim corner of the Palace Restaurant during a slow noon hour, Neil Fanoe, Clarence (Toots) Vosti and Tondre Alarid railed against the political and economic forces that seem to conspire against their livelihoods. The three men have a combined total of 120 years of experience as sugar beet farmers and are awaiting word from Washington whether 1985 will be their last harvest for the gnarled root that is processed into refined white sugar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1995
The "dawn of prosperity," as a local newspaper called it, came to Los Alamitos in 1897, when a sugar factory opened. For nearly three decades the industry was the lifeblood of the town. Immigrant families from Europe, especially Belgium, grew sugar beets until the 1920s, when worms wiped out the crops. Source: "Early Los Alamitos," by the Los Alamitos Museum Assn.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The notice still taped to the glass front door of the sprawling sugar beet processing plant is blunt: "Effective Friday, Oct. 30, 1992 . . . applications for employment will no longer be accepted." It is last year's sign, posted after the plant--across the Red River of the North from this sleepy farm town--had completed hiring for the "fall campaign," when mounds of sugar beets the size of bloated softballs are cleaned, sliced, boiled and crystallized into processed sugar.
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