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NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
As if studying product labels to keep tabs on calories, carbs and fat grams wasn't painful enough, now dieters have this to worry about: one bakery's "goodies that taste good without being bad" are actually quite naughty, after all. Clifton, N.J.-based Butterfly Bakery promises careful eaters that its sugar-free, no-sugar-added and gluten-free baked goods "will turn your dietary restriction into a dietary indulgence. "  An indulgence, indeed: on Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration said that tests on samples of Butterfly Bakery products showed that foods labeled as "sugar free" had sugar and that claims about sugar and fat content were false and misleading -- and that the agency obtained a consent decree that effectively shut down operations at the company "for unlawfully distributing mislabeled food products, such as muffins and snack cakes.
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BUSINESS
March 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Butterfly Bakery Inc. notes on its website that all of its goodies are "made with 100% love. " Federal regulators say that recipe also includes plenty of sugar - even in food advertised as "sugar-free. " U.S. District Court Judge Dennis M. Cavanaugh approved a consent decree of permanent injunction against the Clifton, N.J., business this month, shutting down its operations until the bakery complies with U.S. Food and Drug Administration labeling requirements. FDA and state officials tested muffins and snack cakes from Butterfly over several years and found that many were misbranded, the FDA said this week.
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BUSINESS
March 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Butterfly Bakery Inc. notes on its website that all of its goodies are "made with 100% love. " Federal regulators say that recipe also includes plenty of sugar - even in food advertised as "sugar-free. " U.S. District Court Judge Dennis M. Cavanaugh approved a consent decree of permanent injunction against the Clifton, N.J., business this month, shutting down its operations until the bakery complies with U.S. Food and Drug Administration labeling requirements. FDA and state officials tested muffins and snack cakes from Butterfly over several years and found that many were misbranded, the FDA said this week.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
As if studying product labels to keep tabs on calories, carbs and fat grams wasn't painful enough, now dieters have this to worry about: one bakery's "goodies that taste good without being bad" are actually quite naughty, after all. Clifton, N.J.-based Butterfly Bakery promises careful eaters that its sugar-free, no-sugar-added and gluten-free baked goods "will turn your dietary restriction into a dietary indulgence. "  An indulgence, indeed: on Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration said that tests on samples of Butterfly Bakery products showed that foods labeled as "sugar free" had sugar and that claims about sugar and fat content were false and misleading -- and that the agency obtained a consent decree that effectively shut down operations at the company "for unlawfully distributing mislabeled food products, such as muffins and snack cakes.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2007
Makers of sugar-free foods must tell consumers when their products aren't low-calorie or reduced in calories, U.S. regulators said. The Food and Drug Administration is "concerned about a number of products" advertised as sugar-free that don't bear the required disclaimer on calories, according to a letter to manufacturers posted on the agency's website. Consumers might erroneously assume that all products without sugar will help them lose weight, the FDA said.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE
When the traffic is bumper-to-bumper, horns are blaring and the pain in your brain is driving you insane, don't sink your teeth into the red Mazda next to you--chew on Peace of Mind gum balls instead. The latest in a long line of stress-relief products from Origins, these gum balls contain a relaxing blend of essential oils, including peppermint, basil and eucalyptus, that are said to work together to release tension and freshen breath. Who can argue with that?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987 | STEVE HOCHMAN and FO
Band: Wa Wa Nee. Personnel: Paul Gray, vocals, keyboards; Steve Williams, guitar; Mark Gray, bass; the Sween, drums. History: Wa Wa Nee (the group says the name has no particular meaning) formed in 1984 in Sydney, Australia, when Paul Gray hooked up with Williams. Though Williams had played in several Sydney bands, Gray's musical experience was restricted to classical and jazz studies.
SPORTS
May 3, 1986
When is Dodger management going to stop treating fans like little kids? Several years ago, we were deprived of brew in the bleachers. Then, in areas where beer continued to be sold, we were told we could only buy two frosties at a time and couldn't have one after the eighth inning. The latest insult is joke light beer. I hate light beer. It's right up there with sushi, sodium-free bran flakes, dichondra salad and hamburgers on whole wheat buns. Dodger Stadium concession stands offer salted and unsalted peanuts; regular and sugar-free Cokes; Dodger dogs and spicy dogs.
HEALTH
October 31, 2011 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Dollars to doughnuts, the ghosts and goblins and Angry Birds who show up at your door Monday night will not have their little hearts set on baby carrots or celery sticks. And statistics show — surprise! — that most won't have to settle for them either. Candy flies off the shelves at Halloween — about 600 million pounds of it every season, including roughly 90 million pounds of chocolate, according to market researchers at Nielsen Co. The total bill for all these treats will run to $2.3 billion this year, the National Confectioners Assn.
HEALTH
September 15, 2012 | Dana Sullivan Kilroy
Every couple of years a food or beverage is crowned with what nutrition experts call a "health halo. " Some of the foods -- wild salmon, blueberries, flax seeds -- deserve it. But others gain status for no apparent reason. Acai berry, anyone? It's not that the trendy food is unhealthful. It's just that if you're already eating a well-balanced diet it's unnecessary. And possibly expensive. The latest entrant in this category: coconut water. Coconut water -- the mildly sweet liquid from the center of young, green coconuts -- has been popular in tropical areas since, well, as long as people have lived among coconut palm trees.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Some people chew sugar-free gum as a weight loss strategy, but does it work? An recent online study in the journal Obesity finds that chewing gum daily may have no effect on losing weight. The eight-week study included 201 overweight or obese adults, about half of whom were randomly put in an intervention group and told to chew gum daily for at least 90 minutes at specific times throughout the day. The others were part of a control group that did not chew gum. Both groups were given nutritional information and told to continue their regular activity programs.
HEALTH
October 31, 2011 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Dollars to doughnuts, the ghosts and goblins and Angry Birds who show up at your door Monday night will not have their little hearts set on baby carrots or celery sticks. And statistics show — surprise! — that most won't have to settle for them either. Candy flies off the shelves at Halloween — about 600 million pounds of it every season, including roughly 90 million pounds of chocolate, according to market researchers at Nielsen Co. The total bill for all these treats will run to $2.3 billion this year, the National Confectioners Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2007 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Although Christmas music has proliferated over the past couple of decades, the anti-carol has become a genre unto itself, seeking to tweak the standard sentiments of religious devotion, warm conviviality and fuzzy nostalgia .
BUSINESS
September 9, 2007
Makers of sugar-free foods must tell consumers when their products aren't low-calorie or reduced in calories, U.S. regulators said. The Food and Drug Administration is "concerned about a number of products" advertised as sugar-free that don't bear the required disclaimer on calories, according to a letter to manufacturers posted on the agency's website. Consumers might erroneously assume that all products without sugar will help them lose weight, the FDA said.
HEALTH
July 29, 2002 | SALLY SQUIRES, WASHINGTON POST
With a nod of approval this month from the Food and Drug Administration, the latest sugar substitute--neotame--is poised to become a new ingredient in baked goods, soft drinks, chewing gum, frozen desserts and other products. Already approved in Australia and New Zealand, neotame joins the sweeteners aspartame (sold as NutraSweet and Equal), acesulfame potassium (Sunett and Sweet One), saccharin (Sweet'N Low) and sucralose (Splenda) now on the market.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1985
As a long-time devotee of Patsy Cline, I couldn't resist an opportunity to view the biographical movie "Sweet Dreams." I am offended, however, that Hollywood, in its attempt to attract bigger audiences, should portray this sensitive personality as a gutter-mouthed bitch who even made obscene gestures to her mother. Anyone who has felt the penetrating warmth of this artist through her unforgettable voice and soul-stirring love songs knows in their heart that the real Patsy simply didn't behave that way. Consider, also, that she rose to fame in the late 1950s and early 1960s from humble beginnings deep in the Southern Bible Belt, and Hollywood's concept becomes even more preposterous.
FOOD
July 18, 1991 | CHARLES PERRY
The most exotic bottled water in the country has to be Vermont Nouveau Sapwater, available locally (and seasonally) in Vermont. It's basically the water that is filtered from maple sap in the making of maple syrup. The Wall Street Journal describes it as having an "earthy" taste, which may be why it's carbonated and available in raspberry or lemon as well as plain. Socrates' Last Meal Quail are immune to the poison in hemlock, so you could die after eating a wild quail who has fed on it.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE
When the traffic is bumper-to-bumper, horns are blaring and the pain in your brain is driving you insane, don't sink your teeth into the red Mazda next to you--chew on Peace of Mind gum balls instead. The latest in a long line of stress-relief products from Origins, these gum balls contain a relaxing blend of essential oils, including peppermint, basil and eucalyptus, that are said to work together to release tension and freshen breath. Who can argue with that?
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Take a stroll down a supermarket aisle and you're likely to find shoppers studying the sides of boxes, reading labels on cans, just trying to make sense of all the ingredients in the various food items. It's enough of a chore for the average consumer to select the right food, with the right balance of carbohydrates, sodium, nutrients, fat, calories and cholesterol. But when the consumer is on a strict diet, choosing the proper items can be a much more difficult and critical task.
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