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Sugar Program

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NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
WASHINGTON -- An effort by food and beverage makers to gut a federal program that protects domestic sugar producers from foreign competition was roundly defeated Wednesday in the House Agriculture Committee. By a vote of 36 to 10, the committee opposed an amendment to the 2012 farm bill that would have allowed more imports of foreign sugar, making it less expensive for food and beverage companies to buy the ingredient.  A similar amendment was narrowly defeated in the Senate when that chamber passed its farm bill last month.
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OPINION
September 9, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Federal efforts to protect growers of sugar beets and sugar cane epitomize everything that's wrong with U.S. farm programs. At times they've artificially raised the price of sugar, costing consumers billions of dollars; at other times they've stuck taxpayers with the bill for the surplus sugar production they've promoted. The fact that the sugar program is likely to survive the latest rewrite of the farm bill unscathed is a testament to how limited the bill's "reforms" are. Sweeteners are ubiquitous in processed foods, and sugar is the most popular by far. There are two primary sources in the United States: sugar beets, which are grown in parts of California (mainly in Imperial County)
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BUSINESS
July 6, 2012 | By Kim Geiger, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Makers of sodas, candy bars and other sweetened snacks are taking aim at a long-standing federal program that keeps sugar prices high by restricting imports. Doing away with the sugar program would be a "huge boost" to candy makers and help them grow, said Robert Simpson Jr., president of Jelly Belly Candy Co., which has factories in Fairfield, Calif., Chicago and Thailand. But the efforts of manufacturers are sparking intense opposition among lawmakers from sugar-growing states and the sugar lobby, as well as from some public health advocates.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
WASHINGTON -- An effort by food and beverage makers to gut a federal program that protects domestic sugar producers from foreign competition was roundly defeated Wednesday in the House Agriculture Committee. By a vote of 36 to 10, the committee opposed an amendment to the 2012 farm bill that would have allowed more imports of foreign sugar, making it less expensive for food and beverage companies to buy the ingredient.  A similar amendment was narrowly defeated in the Senate when that chamber passed its farm bill last month.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1989
Your recent article about the sugar support program ("U.S. Losing Its Appetite for Sugar Support Program," Oct. 29) unfairly clouds the facts about the U.S. sugar programs and paints an inaccurate picture of the sweetener industry. By law, the U.S. Sugar Program operates at no cost to taxpayers. For the last eight years the program has helped to maintain a viable U.S. sugar and corn sweetener industry in the face of foreign sugar being dumped on the market at prices far below the cost of production.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silhouetted in a faint pink sunrise, another convoy of squat dump trucks, looking like so many motorized ants, turns slowly into the entrance of the Southern Minnesota Sugar Cooperative to disgorge its top-heavy loads for processing. It's harvest time here in sugar beet country, and the trucks will stream in around the clock until March. Some 300 farmers sell through this co-op, and sugar is their most profitable crop. Sugar beets net up to four times what corn and soybeans bring in. But wait.
OPINION
April 26, 2005
The April 16 editorial, "Sugar-Coated Nonsense," displayed a misunderstanding of the U.S. sugar program and global trade in sugar. U.S. beet sugar farmers have the world's third-lowest cost of production, and two-thirds of the world's cane sugar producers have higher costs than U.S. growers. As a result, American consumers enjoy prices 23% lower than the average cost in other developed countries. However, virtually every major producer uses barriers and indirect subsidies to protect domestic sugar production, making the world sugar market the second-most distorted agricultural commodity in the world (after rice)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1989
The extension and enlargement of the sugar import quota will at least cool the inflation in the price of sweeteners in the United States, but it is only window dressing. The real need continues to be restoration of a free market and abolition of the sugar program. Congress will have an opportunity to do just that when the new five-year farm bill is written next year. The action on the U.S.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For American consumers, summer has brought sweet treats like ice cream, lemonade and cotton candy. But for the nation's sugar growers and the tens of thousands of workers whose jobs rely on the sugar industry, these have not been sweet times. With Congress set to begin work on the 1995 farm bill next week, growers of the sugar cane, sugar beets and corn that satisfy the nation's sweet tooth are under siege from a powerful coalition of conservatives and liberals.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2012 | By Kim Geiger, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Makers of sodas, candy bars and other sweetened snacks are taking aim at a long-standing federal program that keeps sugar prices high by restricting imports. Doing away with the sugar program would be a "huge boost" to candy makers and help them grow, said Robert Simpson Jr., president of Jelly Belly Candy Co., which has factories in Fairfield, Calif., Chicago and Thailand. But the efforts of manufacturers are sparking intense opposition among lawmakers from sugar-growing states and the sugar lobby, as well as from some public health advocates.
OPINION
April 26, 2005
The April 16 editorial, "Sugar-Coated Nonsense," displayed a misunderstanding of the U.S. sugar program and global trade in sugar. U.S. beet sugar farmers have the world's third-lowest cost of production, and two-thirds of the world's cane sugar producers have higher costs than U.S. growers. As a result, American consumers enjoy prices 23% lower than the average cost in other developed countries. However, virtually every major producer uses barriers and indirect subsidies to protect domestic sugar production, making the world sugar market the second-most distorted agricultural commodity in the world (after rice)
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For American consumers, summer has brought sweet treats like ice cream, lemonade and cotton candy. But for the nation's sugar growers and the tens of thousands of workers whose jobs rely on the sugar industry, these have not been sweet times. With Congress set to begin work on the 1995 farm bill next week, growers of the sugar cane, sugar beets and corn that satisfy the nation's sweet tooth are under siege from a powerful coalition of conservatives and liberals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1990
Sugar Price Supports By a vote of 150 to 271, the House rejected an amendment to lower from 18 cents to 16 cents per pound the level at which the government props up the price of domestic sugar. Although the program sets an artificially high price that works its way through to consumers, it operates at small cost to the Treasury. The vote occurred as the House debated a five-year extension of federal farm programs (HR 3950). Supporter Jim Moody (R-Wis.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress on Tuesday defeated efforts to cut sugar price supports from 18 cents to 16 cents a pound, dashing hopes of urban lawmakers who wanted to make major changes in the nation's farm program that they said would lower consumers' food bills. The Senate, acting first, killed a proposal to revise the much-criticized sugar program by a vote of 54 to 44. In the House, legislation to make an identical two-cent cut in the sugar loan rate was crushed, 271 to 150.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1990 | United Press International
The U.S. sugar and dairy programs may be "our two most vulnerable" programs for reform if world trade talks are successful, Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter said today. In an interview on National Public Radio, Yeutter said the just-concluded Houston economic summit marked the first time the European Community has agreed to negotiate possible reductions in export subsidies. "Sugar and dairy products are probably our two most vulnerable" programs, Yeutter said, because the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress on Tuesday defeated efforts to cut sugar price supports from 18 cents to 16 cents a pound, dashing hopes of urban lawmakers who wanted to make major changes in the nation's farm program that they said would lower consumers' food bills. The Senate, acting first, killed a proposal to revise the much-criticized sugar program by a vote of 54 to 44. In the House, legislation to make an identical two-cent cut in the sugar loan rate was crushed, 271 to 150.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1990
Sugar Price Supports By a vote of 150 to 271, the House rejected an amendment to lower from 18 cents to 16 cents per pound the level at which the government props up the price of domestic sugar. Although the program sets an artificially high price that works its way through to consumers, it operates at small cost to the Treasury. The vote occurred as the House debated a five-year extension of federal farm programs (HR 3950). Supporter Jim Moody (R-Wis.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1989
Your recent article about the sugar support program ("U.S. Losing Its Appetite for Sugar Support Program," Oct. 29) unfairly clouds the facts about the U.S. sugar programs and paints an inaccurate picture of the sweetener industry. By law, the U.S. Sugar Program operates at no cost to taxpayers. For the last eight years the program has helped to maintain a viable U.S. sugar and corn sweetener industry in the face of foreign sugar being dumped on the market at prices far below the cost of production.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silhouetted in a faint pink sunrise, another convoy of squat dump trucks, looking like so many motorized ants, turns slowly into the entrance of the Southern Minnesota Sugar Cooperative to disgorge its top-heavy loads for processing. It's harvest time here in sugar beet country, and the trucks will stream in around the clock until March. Some 300 farmers sell through this co-op, and sugar is their most profitable crop. Sugar beets net up to four times what corn and soybeans bring in. But wait.
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