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Sugar Ray Leonard

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June 13, 1989 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Examined from a more distant perspective than 1989, this decade will likely loom as one of boxing's greatest, and mostly for the intrigue offered by two of its most charismatic performers. Sugar Ray Leonard and Thomas Hearns, though shadows of the two men who met in that benchmark of boxing events back in 1981, only deepened that intrigue Monday night in a draw that was oddly satisfying for all its inconclusiveness. It is difficult to believe that Hearns, whose loss to Leonard in this same desert setting eight years ago has been one of the sport's more remarkable open wounds, did not actually beat his longtime tormentor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
A powerful story of triumph and tragedy - and the infamous moment that encapsulated both - gets a stirring workout in the colorful, absorbing documentary "The Good Son: The Life of Ray 'Boom Boom' Mancini," directed by Jesse James Miler, based on the book by Mark Kriegel. Early-1980s sports icon Ray Mancini grew up in Youngstown, Ohio, idolizing his father, 1940s' top-ranked lightweight contender Lenny "Boom Boom" Mancini, and devoted to his older brother, Lenny Jr., who also briefly boxed.
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SPORTS
May 18, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Sugar Ray Leonard alleges in his upcoming autobiography that he was sexually abused as a teenager in the 1970s by an unnamed "prominent Olympic boxing coach," a stunning claim by the former U.S. Olympic and world champion fighter who became one of the most popular fighters in the sport's history. "I'm baffled by all of this coming out now, I had no idea," said veteran fight promoter Bob Arum, who promoted Leonard's victory over Marvin Hagler in 1987. "That's horrible. He never told me, but my experience with Ray is that he's an honest guy. " Leonard's book, "The Big Fight: My Life In and Out of the Ring," depicts significant family trauma, including his parents' domestic problems, his own cocaine and alcohol use and becoming a parent as a teenager.
SPORTS
February 5, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
It wasn't just the words — "You're blowing it, son!" — that Sugar Ray Leonard heard as he peered into the wise, aged eyes of trainer Angelo Dundee more than 30 years ago. Leonard also caught the sincerity of the message, and with that the motivation necessary to score a remarkable 14th-round knockout of Thomas Hearns that enhanced his standing as an icon of boxing. Leonard, a Southland resident, is now beginning work on a film version of his recent autobiography. Dundee, who died Wednesday at 90, is best remembered for being the longtime trainer of Muhammad Ali and Leonard.
SPORTS
February 5, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
It wasn't just the words — "You're blowing it, son!" — that Sugar Ray Leonard heard as he peered into the wise, aged eyes of trainer Angelo Dundee more than 30 years ago. Leonard also caught the sincerity of the message, and with that the motivation necessary to score a remarkable 14th-round knockout of Thomas Hearns that enhanced his standing as an icon of boxing. Leonard, a Southland resident, is now beginning work on a film version of his recent autobiography. Dundee, who died Wednesday at 90, is best remembered for being the longtime trainer of Muhammad Ali and Leonard.
SPORTS
September 4, 1988 | DAVE RAFFO, United Press International
When they talk in public about their Nov. 7 fight, Sugar Ray Leonard likes to remind Donny Lalonde he is more than a great boxer. "I am a master of psychology," Leonard says. He goes on to point out how Lalonde has never been under the spotlight of a multi-million dollar bout that will attract coverage around the world. Lalonde's manager, Dave Wolf, smiles when he hears such talk from Leonard. "Leonard's already made a major mistake," Wolf said.
SPORTS
August 19, 1987 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
All eyes were on the familiar face at the interview room table at the Indiana Convention Center Tuesday night. In the back of the room, an unseen athlete, a Cuban, gawked at one of his heroes. The man at the table was Sugar Ray Leonard, who was saying to 50-or-so reporters that he hopes to play a role with the 1988 U.S. Olympic boxing team. He also talked about his new firm, SRL Management, which he said will be a New York-based management/promotional firm that will handle pro boxers.
SPORTS
December 7, 1989 | From United Press International
The Internal Revenue Service is guaranteed a cut of the Roberto Duran-Sugar Ray Leonard fight tonight regardless of who wins, with an agreement to collect $1.8 million from Duran's purse to repay a mistaken tax refund. The IRS mistakenly sent $1.5 million to Duran and then tried to have the Panamanian fighter arrested when he failed to repay it, the Justice Department said today. But the dispute has been settled, and Duran, 38, will repay the money from his $7.
SPORTS
November 27, 1989 | WILLIAM GILDEA, THE WASHINGTON POST
Before he fought Thomas Hearns in June, Sugar Ray Leonard put on a show almost every day. He'd arrive in a gleaming white limo for his daily workouts under a grand tent at a luxury golf resort in Florida. He looked terrific in hot-pink shorts. As if his entourage wasn't big enough, he'd entertain scores of admirers at each session. Who would have thought he couldn't beat Hearns? Now it's quiet around Leonard. Very quiet.
SPORTS
August 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Dethroned heavyweight champion Mike Tyson still packs a punch at the bank. With an estimated $28.6 million in income this year, he's the highest paid athlete in the world, according to Forbes magazine. Buster Douglas, little known until he upset Tyson for the heavyweight title in February, is second at $26 million, followed by another boxer, Sugar Ray Leonard, at $13 million. Next come two race car drivers, Ayrton Senna at $10 million and Alain Prost at $9 million.
SPORTS
May 18, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Sugar Ray Leonard alleges in his upcoming autobiography that he was sexually abused as a teenager in the 1970s by an unnamed "prominent Olympic boxing coach," a stunning claim by the former U.S. Olympic and world champion fighter who became one of the most popular fighters in the sport's history. "I'm baffled by all of this coming out now, I had no idea," said veteran fight promoter Bob Arum, who promoted Leonard's victory over Marvin Hagler in 1987. "That's horrible. He never told me, but my experience with Ray is that he's an honest guy. " Leonard's book, "The Big Fight: My Life In and Out of the Ring," depicts significant family trauma, including his parents' domestic problems, his own cocaine and alcohol use and becoming a parent as a teenager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2009 | Lance Pugmire
Lou Filippo, a boxing hall of famer from Downey who became a referee and ring judge, memorably counting out Sylvester Stallone's champion rival Apollo Creed in the film "Rocky II," died Monday at Downey Regional Medical Center after suffering a stroke. He was 83. Filippo was a distinguished amateur fighter who fought in more than 250 bouts before turning pro. His fighting career ended in 1957 with a no-contest outcome and a technical knockout loss against Hall of Famer Carlos Ortiz, a bout stopped because of Filippo's cuts -- bleeding plagued his 23-9-3 pro career.
MAGAZINE
August 4, 2002 | MARK EHRMAN
INVITED TO: Sugar Ray Leonard presents boxing live from the Playboy Mansion. TURN-ONS/TURNOFFS: "If you think about it, Playboy and boxing, they both are very sexy," asserts presenter/promoter Sugar Ray Leonard, celebrating the 25th anniversary of his professional entry into the sport while staging his monthly ESPN2 fight club broadcast at the mansion. "Something about a boxer is very sexy. I think this is a perfect fit." Well, who's to argue?
SPORTS
January 16, 2002 | Larry Stewart
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. What: "SportsCentury: Sugar Ray Leonard" Where: ESPN Classic, Friday, 5 and 8 p.m. Sugar Ray Leonard says as this profile opens, "There is no greater feeling than being on center stage in the ring." He also says his goal "was to be world-wide known."
SPORTS
September 15, 1999 | SUGAR RAY LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1987, Sugar Ray Leonard had the boxing world's attention when he came back from a three-year retirement to fight Marvin Hagler for the World Boxing Council middleweight title. Leonard won a split decision in a memorable fight. Saturday night, Oscar De La Hoya and Felix Trinidad, both unbeaten, will meet at Las Vegas in a blockbuster welterweight title fight. So who better to analyze the participants than Leonard, who won titles in five weight classes?
SPORTS
March 11, 1997 | SHAV GLICK
The ACC basketball tournament has always been a financial success, so the conference decided to reward the participants. Each of the nine teams received 25 TV-VCRs for players, coaches, managers, trainers, athletic directors, faculty athletic representatives and school presidents. The NCAA said the gift is acceptable under its rule permitting leagues to reward participants in conference championship events with gifts worth up to $300.
SPORTS
December 5, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Arcel, 90, started training boxers in 1917, in New York's East Harlem and says that in his 65-year career, he has seen three naturals. "I rank Roberto Duran with two other guys who were naturals, guys who never had to be taught a thing about how to box--Sugar Ray Robinson and Harry Greb," Arcel said from his New York home. "Oh, I'd occasionally point out something Roberto wasn't doing correctly, but it was always a little thing, certainly nothing fundamental.
SPORTS
September 15, 1999 | SUGAR RAY LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1987, Sugar Ray Leonard had the boxing world's attention when he came back from a three-year retirement to fight Marvin Hagler for the World Boxing Council middleweight title. Leonard won a split decision in a memorable fight. Saturday night, Oscar De La Hoya and Felix Trinidad, both unbeaten, will meet at Las Vegas in a blockbuster welterweight title fight. So who better to analyze the participants than Leonard, who won titles in five weight classes?
SPORTS
March 1, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It isn't really a circus unless you have a clown. Sugar Ray Leonard's unseemly return to boxing tonight at 40, after a six-year absence from the ring, figured to generate a circus atmosphere. But Hector Camacho as the opponent adds the final touch. "This is as serious as I've ever been for a fight," he said. Really. So serious that Camacho: --Charged Leonard with using steroids in a ranting performance at a Las Vegas news conference in January.
SPORTS
February 27, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the sweetest time of all for the sugar man. Ray Leonard has his opponent in a corner with no escape and he's loving it. His eyes are sparkling, his body is swaying, his hands are flying and his mouth is running. "Bam! Bam! Bam!," he says. "Give it up. Give it up. It's over." His opponent knows it's over. He has been watching Leonard operate for 40 years, and victory has rarely slipped from the man's grasp. Cicero Leonard hopelessly pushes back from the table.
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