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Sugar Ray Robinson

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SPORTS
April 13, 1989 | JERRY COHEN, Special to the Times
Sugar Ray Robinson, considered by many to have been the greatest prizefighter ever, died Wednesday at age 67. Robinson, whose skills, resiliency and longevity in the ring were legendary, had been a victim of Alzheimer's disease for six years, but the cause of his death was not immediately attributable, a spokesman for the L.A. County Coroner's office said. Robinson had lived in Los Angeles for 27 years, but recently he was rarely seen in public because of the ravaging illness, a mysterious brain disease of uncertain cause and with no known cure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2012
Carmen Basilio, 85, a genial onion farmer's son who wrested the world middleweight boxing crown from Sugar Ray Robinson in 1957 and lost an equally epic, razor-edge rematch six months later, died Wednesday at a Rochester, N.Y., hospital following treatment for pneumonia, said Edward Brophy, executive director of the Boxing Hall of Fame. The boxer was among the Hall of Fame's first class of inductees, in 1990. With his crouching style, Basilio bored relentlessly into opponents, wearing them down with body blows.
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SPORTS
April 14, 1989
An autopsy revealed that Sugar Ray Robinson died of heart disease, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County coroner's office said. A post-mortem examination showed Robinson died of a gradual weakening and hardening of the arteries. Robinson also had Alzheimer's disease and diabetes. The Rev. Jesse Jackson will preside at Robinson's funeral services, set for 11 a.m. Wednesday at the West Angeles Church of God and Christ. The public may pay its respects Monday and Tuesday at the Angeles Funeral Home.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2009 | Tim Rutten
When I was a young boxing writer, I once was invited to watch historic fight films with a small group that included Sugar Ray Robinson, by then long retired from the ring. Suffice to say, I was -- by several orders of magnitude -- the most ignorant person in the room, but the deference our companions paid even Robinson's briefest comment was striking. For my part, I recall being struck by the unexpected sophistication -- even delicacy -- of his descriptive vocabulary, which was studded with phrases borrowed from the worlds of dance and music, mainly jazz, and framed with a kind of poetic precision.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Sugar Ray Robinson, generally considered the best pound-for-pound fighter who ever lived, died today in a Culver City hospital emergency room after a long illness. He was 67. A former world welterweight and middleweight champion, Robinson died at Brotman Medical Center. His wife, Millie, was with him. Robinson had been reported to be suffering from Alzheimer's disease as well as diabetes and hypertension. Robinson retired from boxing in 1965 after a record of 174-19-6 with 110 knockouts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2009 | Tim Rutten
When I was a young boxing writer, I once was invited to watch historic fight films with a small group that included Sugar Ray Robinson, by then long retired from the ring. Suffice to say, I was -- by several orders of magnitude -- the most ignorant person in the room, but the deference our companions paid even Robinson's briefest comment was striking. For my part, I recall being struck by the unexpected sophistication -- even delicacy -- of his descriptive vocabulary, which was studded with phrases borrowed from the worlds of dance and music, mainly jazz, and framed with a kind of poetic precision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1989
"He was part of the American quilt. His patch in that quilt had non-negotiable integrity. . . . He was born on the bottom, but left on the top. He went from the 'gutter-most' to the 'uppermost.' " --The Rev. Jesse Jackson, eulogizing boxer Sugar Ray Robinson.
SPORTS
April 19, 1989 | From Times wire services
Legendary boxer Sugar Ray Robinson "personified class, style and dignity," heavyweight champ Mike Tyson told more than 2,300 mourners who filled a Los Angeles church today for the five-time middleweight champion's funeral. Memories of Robinson, who died last week at age 67, so moved Tyson that his voice choked and he apologized to the throng filling the West Angeles Church of God in Christ. "I had the privilege of meeting Sugar Ray," Tyson said. "Sugar Ray Robinson personified class, style and dignity."
SPORTS
April 6, 1991
Thumbs down to Earl Gustkey for his commentary on the "courage" of Ray Leonard. How much courage did it take for Leonard to admit his drug and alcohol abuse after his former wife had attested to it? Did he have any choice? How much courage did it take to cuff her around? Real courage is Lou Gehrig. Real courage is Louis after Schmeling. Real courage is Sugar Ray Robinson on his deathbed without the entourage. The Leonard story may not be over yet, nor the era of the self-absorbed, overpraised and overpaid athlete.
SPORTS
April 15, 1989
The king is dead. The boxing world had never seen the likes of Sugar Ray Robinson before and may never see it again. He fought gallantly until age 45, retiring in 1965 after winning 175 of 200 fights--with most of his defeats occurring after he was past his prime, and even those came on close decisions. He was a welterweight and later middleweight champion--only heat exhaustion on a hot muggy New York night prevented him from becoming light heavyweight champion as well. Yet some tend to qualify his greatness with such qualifiers as the best "pound for pound," "one of the greatest . . . " or "considered by many" as the greatest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bobby Dykes, 77, a boxer in the 1940s and '50s who fought Kid Gavilan and Sugar Ray Robinson, died Wednesday of Lou Gehrig's disease at his home in Coral Gables, Fla., his son-in-law Harry Roberts said. The lanky white left-hander from San Antonio earned a title fight against welterweight champion Kid Gavilan in 1952. The bout was the first between a white and a black boxer in then-segregated Miami, and the Cuban-born Gavilan won a split decision.
BOOKS
March 27, 2005 | Walter Bernstein, Walter Bernstein is a veteran journalist and screenwriter and the author of "Inside Out: A Memoir of the Blacklist."
In one of his fights with Jake LaMotta back in the 1940s, Sugar Ray Robinson did something uncharacteristic. First, he let LaMotta back him into the ropes. There, Robinson dropped one hand to his side and draped the other across the top strand and allowed LaMotta to throw punches at him without throwing anything back. I saw this at Madison Square Garden, and although I had often seen Robinson fight, this was something new and very dangerous. He had always fought daringly but never stupidly.
SPORTS
May 18, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Which would be worse: * Getting knocked cold in a championship prize fight? * Being told that your estranged wife has had your purse held up with a lawsuit? On this date 43 years ago, both of those things happened to former middleweight champion Carl "Bobo" Olson. First, he lost for the fourth consecutive time to Sugar Ray Robinson at Los Angeles' Wrigley Field. And for the third time in those four fights, Robinson knocked him out.
SPORTS
May 1, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the immediate aftermath--and even now, 42 years later--few could get over its suddenness. That middleweight champion Gene Fullmer, a muscle-bound tank of a man with a jaw that looked carved from granite, could be rendered so helpless with one punch defied belief. Yet there he was, crawling around on the Chicago Stadium ring floor, unable to make his legs work.
SPORTS
March 25, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was one of the most amazing athletes of the century. And like Muhammad Ali, it seemed for several years late in his career that the older he became, the better he was. Early in his career he was considered history's best welterweight, losing only once at 147 pounds between 1940 and 1951. He held the welterweight title from 1946 to '51, when he took Jake LaMotta's middleweight crown.
SPORTS
February 14, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Sugar Ray Robinson and Jake LaMotta were made to fight each other. Their fights were classics, and they always made money. That's why they fought six times (Robinson won five). Forty-eight years ago today, in their final meeting, welterweight champion Robinson won the world middleweight championship for the first time with a 13th-round technical knockout over LaMotta, before 14,802 who paid $180,619.64 at Chicago Stadium to see yet another savage battle.
SPORTS
May 9, 1987
I just finished reading the Sugar Ray Robinson article by Earl Gustkey and I want to compliment him on the grace with which he handled a sensitive subject. We all grieve for the suffering of the great ones. Sugar Ray Robinson will always be the standard by which all other are compared. I was 11 years old when he knocked out Gene Fuller, but I can remember all of my uncles and my father and his friends talking about it. I remember how excited they were. Many years later, I purchased a videotape of famous fighters and the Fullmer-Robinson match is on the tape.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | DICK WAGNER, Times Staff Writer
In the style of Muhammad Ali, the kid danced inside a boxing ring and punched the air with gloved hands. Beyond the storefront gym windows that silhouetted him, late-afternoon traffic passed on Long Beach Boulevard. Watching the kid work out last week were his father at ringside, a sidewalk passer-by whose nose was pressed against the glass, and--staring from magazine covers on the walls--the greatest fighters of all time.
SPORTS
December 8, 1998 | LARRY STEWART
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. What: "Sugar Ray Robinson: The Bright Lights and Dark Shadows of a Champion" Where: HBO When: Tonight, 10. The rather lengthy title tells the story of this excellent one-hour documentary on the life of one of boxing's all-time greats, Sugar Ray Robinson.
SPORTS
April 6, 1991
Thumbs down to Earl Gustkey for his commentary on the "courage" of Ray Leonard. How much courage did it take for Leonard to admit his drug and alcohol abuse after his former wife had attested to it? Did he have any choice? How much courage did it take to cuff her around? Real courage is Lou Gehrig. Real courage is Louis after Schmeling. Real courage is Sugar Ray Robinson on his deathbed without the entourage. The Leonard story may not be over yet, nor the era of the self-absorbed, overpraised and overpaid athlete.
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