Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSuhaila Seddiqi
IN THE NEWS

Suhaila Seddiqi

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her voice is barely a whisper and she glides about with the grace of a swan, but there is little else soft or feminine about Suhaila Seddiqi. The only female general in the Afghan army, the 62-year-old military surgeon who will become health minister Saturday has strayed about as far from tradition as Islam and her countrymen allow.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her voice is barely a whisper and she glides about with the grace of a swan, but there is little else soft or feminine about Suhaila Seddiqi. The only female general in the Afghan army, the 62-year-old military surgeon who will become health minister Saturday has strayed about as far from tradition as Islam and her countrymen allow.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Afghanistan's health minister, one of the few women in the new Kabul government, has asked the United Nations to help set up training for medical workers, especially women, the World Health Organization said. Dr. Suhaila Seddiqi, who met a team from WHO that was sent to the capital this week to assess the country's health needs, said the training of women is key because they are a crucial asset in the health system. Afghanistan's former Taliban rulers barred women from all jobs.
WORLD
September 7, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Hamid Karzai said Friday that an assassin who tried to kill him the day before "had links to Al Qaeda," but he vowed that neither the shooting nor a car bombing that killed at least 24 Afghans here would divert his country from its road to recovery. At the same time, Karzai said the two attacks Thursday were the acts of isolated individuals and "do not indicate serious problems" in his nation. "Generally our security is good," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2001 | GEOFFREY MOHAN and NITA LELYVELD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California's Afghan immigrants watched with unaccustomed optimism as Prime Minister Hamid Karzai took office Saturday amid promises of a multiethnic government for a country long troubled by war. Afghan women, who fared worst under the harsh form of Islamic rules promulgated by the Taliban regime, were nearly ebullient over the new government, particularly since it now counts the international support that previous regimes lacked. "We are so excited and very hopeful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2002 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Afghanistan made her strong, then broke her heart. But with the defeat of the Taliban and formation of a new government, Kawky Anwar sees hope for a land ravaged by war and religious extremism. "I was born there, raised there, got married there, had children there, got all my education there," said the Simi Valley woman, president of the Afghan Women Assn. of Southern California. "I had good times and good memories of my country. I feel now that I have my country back."
NEWS
December 6, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The news that a woman has been named deputy prime minister of Afghanistan made headlines around the world Wednesday, but perhaps nowhere did it mean as much as in a small clinic here, halfway down an alley swirling with noise, donkeys and dust, miles from the Afghan border. Here, the real significance could be read in the faces of three nurses who stood behind a curtain in the narrow maternity room--broad, shy smiles, with a hint of surprised pride.
WORLD
June 20, 2002 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Afghan leader Hamid Karzai adopted a risky political strategy Wednesday, deciding to include several warlords in his inner circle and retain several key ethnic Tajiks in top government posts. Karzai was inaugurated as the nation's transitional president later Wednesday as a nine-day loya jirga, or grand council, drew to a close. The Cabinet was approved by a show of hands among the more than 1,500 delegates, but many seemed more resigned than genuinely pleased with Karzai's choices.
NEWS
March 24, 2002 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His life is a sweep of recent Afghan history. Episodically over four decades, as this country's politics staggered from monarchy to communism to warlordism to religious extremism, California pathologist G. Gordon Hadley has dedicated himself to teaching young medical students in the troubled land. Now 80, both Hadley and his resiliently cheerful wife, Alphie, who sometimes serves as his lab assistant, are back again.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|